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In the past, I have had power surge at home and my surge suppressor saved my devices

  • Yes

    Votes: 2 66.7%
  • No

    Votes: 1 33.3%
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Discussion Starter #1
I'm trying to find how many folks have actually had a surge at home, and if a surge suppressor really worked in saving whatever was plugged to it, say your home theater or parts of it.
 

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Yep. I had a UPS burn out from a surge. My PC was safe though. That's what I get for gaming on a rainy day.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Thanks folks. Please keep and encourage others to answer the poll. There is very little collated information on consumer experience with surge suppressors.


As there are many types with different levels of protection and quality of make, we can't expect all devices labeled as such to protect everyone who owns one.


In 2000, Consumer Reports had a review were they exposed PCs to high voltages through many brands and types of surge suppressor to see if it protects the PC, but nothing since. The results are similar to the poll results at this time.
 

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Had an event without any surge protection & it was pricey indeed.

Luckily insurance paid for most of the damage.


I now use a surge protector mounted inside of my loadcenter/breaker box.


It is my understanding that there is no protection from a close proximity lightning strike.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Yes, in the end suppression is all the devices supply so the alternate term, surge protector, is used less commonly as it implies some "guarantee" via the word "protection."


Given that a surge can have many forms, if its large and lasts long enough, nothing can stand in its way: like a close lightning strike.


I wrote this on another thread as there is little good discussion in AVS archives.

http://www.avsforum.com/avs-vb/showt...3#post15206043


Overall, the best suppression against power line transients is were the power enters your home. The phone lines and cable TV have suppression provided by the vendors, but surges may go in after the junction boxes, although all these should be grounded. If you have a fiber optic system, the surges can still go if the fiber feeds a copper wire system such as Verizon's FiOS network, surges can enter through satellite TV. Lightning needn't strike nearby, all that is needed is a weather change to induce a static charge into these lines that then make its way to your devices, so the last line of defense in the wall plug-in suppressor.



Quote:
Originally Posted by damon /forum/post/15232347


Had an event without any surge protection & it was pricey indeed.

Luckily insurance paid for most of the damage.


I now use a surge protector mounted inside of my loadcenter/breaker box.


It is my understanding that there is no protection from a close proximity lightning strike.
 

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Here is an interesting industrial article on power surges.

It's more of an infomercial than most of David Morrison's writings but it still has good information.

Devices Stop Most Power-Line Disturbances

Jun 1, 2008 12:00 PM

By David Morrison, Editor in Chief


http://powerelectronics.com/mag/powe...ine/index.html
 

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My current protection scheme is as follows:


Hardwired to the loadcenter & ground:

Cutler-Hammer CHSPUltra


3500 Joules


180,000 Amps (Maximum Surge Current)

 

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Discussion Starter #9
These are most excellent suppressors.









The only possible conduits for surge not mentioned are the Internet connection, if not done by satellite, and your phone, but these may not affect your home theater. A suppressor is often supplied by the cable/satellite/phone company somewhere in your loop but if one can't be sure, having each device with its own plug-in suppressor atop that can't hurt, as lastly there is a remote possibility for spikes to be made within one's own house wiring.


I just read your post here:

http://www.avsforum.com/avs-vb/showt...php?p=15232134


I concur with your quick fix, but its best to have it to NEC specs by a certified electrician. If you have a ground loop found by an audio issue, this ground may not provide your suppressor with its full capabilities if they are tied to this ground.

http://www.codebookcity.com/codearti...article250.htm





Quote:
Originally Posted by damon /forum/post/15236879


My current protection scheme is as follows:


Hardwired to the loadcenter & ground:
Cutler-Hammer CHSPUltra
3500 Joules

180,000 Amps (Maximum Surge Current)
 

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Discussion Starter #10
This is great reference information. Some engineers do not think IEEE C62.x is enough, this now ANSI document specifies what a transient is; a TVSS is built to protect against these specifications. The ANSI C62.x spec is unrevised since 1991.

http://www.eeel.nist.gov/817/pubs/sp...0for%2090s.pdf


Once above that, what becomes TVSS begins to morph into various incarnations of power line conditioners to a UPS, which are increasingly complex, bulky and expensive. Innovolt calls their device a CVSS, as a step about TVSS.


Most electronic devices today use switching power supplies, and a current surge will nearly always cause a fuse or circuit breaker to blow. Also, many brick power supplies are made to operate between 100-240V, as a 'universal adapter' and can deal with "slower" moving fluctuations of current or voltage. As I know, low voltage and current surges were more a problem for inductive loads like motors in HVACs.

http://www.innovolt.com/products.html



Quote:
Originally Posted by Speedskater /forum/post/15234136


Here is an interesting industrial article on power surges.

It's more of an infomercial than most of David Morrison's writings but it still has good information.

Devices Stop Most Power-Line Disturbances

Jun 1, 2008 12:00 PM

By David Morrison, Editor in Chief


http://powerelectronics.com/mag/powe...ine/index.html
 

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I had surge protectors, but was worried and was in the process of unplugging things when lightning hit the tree in my front yard. Some things got fried. I don't think any surge device could have stopped that.


I have a friend who has been protected from smaller surges though.
 

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I had three storm-related surges before taking any measures. Good insurance covered about half of the monetary loss. Being home prevented a potential fire. But I will pay a lot of money to not get another call when I am out of town telling me that my house security alarm is sending out intrusion signals before dying, fried by a thunderstorm as it turned out.


Since then I have bought $,$$$ worth of surge-suppression/conditioning gear for A/V, computer, and assorted other equipment. There has been a lightning hit to the power lines running down the street in front of the house. There has been innumerable thunderstorms with seemingly simultaneous lightning and thunder. This is not to say that anything would have been damaged in any event but I am far less tense than I would be without this kind of equipment.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Thanks humbug2, you suggest seeing lightning hits around your home since you installed your suppressor gear, and I presume nothing has happened to your equipment since?


You can get surges without being hit directly, even miles away can affect anyone if the lines are affected, its just less stronger than if you are near to it. Millions of volts can be suppressed by power company suppressors, or just reduced to thousands or hundreds, or nothing at all, that reach your home.


Thunderstorms or bad weather in a distance alone can induce static discharges than enter your line and reach your equipment or be generated within your house wiring. Most of the time, such charges are dissipated by basic electrical grounding and shielding of house wiring.


I hope you added your experiences to the poll. That many lightning incidents to any individual are unique.



Quote:
Originally Posted by humbug2 /forum/post/15239437


I had three storm-related surges before taking any measures. Good insurance covered about half of the monetary loss. Being home prevented a potential fire. But I will pay a lot of money to not get another call when I am out of town telling me that my house security alarm is sending out intrusion signals before dying, fried by a thunderstorm as it turned out.


Since then I have bought $,$$$ worth of surge-suppression/conditioning gear for A/V, computer, and assorted other equipment. There has been a lightning hit to the power lines running down the street in front of the house. There has been innumerable thunderstorms with seemingly simultaneous lightning and thunder. This is not to say that anything would have been damaged in any event but I am far less tense than I would be without this kind of equipment.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Yes, probably not, but a $20 TVSS may protect it, or self destruct without a fire while protecting whatever is plugged to it.


Unplugging is the best protection, but you may not be able to reach all your devices in time, or big items like appliances. Whole home TVSS can be used, like the CHSP-Ultra.



Quote:
Originally Posted by 2000man /forum/post/15238636


I had surge protectors, but was worried and was in the process of unplugging things when lightning hit the tree in my front yard. Some things got fried. I don't think any surge device could have stopped that.


I have a friend who has been protected from smaller surges though.
 

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I've had surge suppression for years... Only one occasion has it been useless, but not many people can say they've seen ball lightning.



Attic Fan got struck, travelled through my apartment to find the wall of power meters/ground on the opposite side of the building. Killed just about everything. The insurance lady was real nice when i told her "ball lightning". She just sighed and said "okay, what needs to be replaced?" =)


It did fry through 3 UPS/Power Conditioners, 3 "surge" strips, and took out every CRT in the house...


So, is it worth it to get surge protection? Yeah, sure. Just make sure your insurance premiums are up to snuff.
(my claim was upwards of $10k... in an apartment, i'd imagine if something like this went off in some of these theaters, yowza!)
 

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Insurance Coverage & preparation is also a part of any comprehensive protection.


Towards that end I am assembling an Insurance packet that will have a list of all of my gear with pictures, serial #'s & replacement cost info.
 

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Discussion Starter #17

Quote:
Originally Posted by damon /forum/post/15246388


Insurance Coverage & preparation is also a part of any comprehensive protection.


Towards that end I am assembling an Insurance packet that will have a list of all of my gear with pictures, serial #'s & replacement cost info.

Always helps when making claims.


One reads on other posts that TVSS makers are likely to not honor claims made to them.


Here is a interesting link publicly available; its a lawsuit filed by Allstate against Tripp Lite for damages that Allstate claims should be covered by Tripp Lites TVSS insurance:

http://www.tba.org/Opinion_Flash/op_...12-12-2005.htm

http://www.tba2.org/tba_files/TCA/20...tate121205.pdf
 

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Allstate...you can always tell where the storms go...just look for where Allstate has denied coverage.
 

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Seems as if the smaller power events that surge suppressors are able to take and protect equipment from often go unnoticed. While large surge events that do actual damage with or without suppression are. It would be interesting to know if and what they where using and the results. I've heard to many stories about people running around disconnecting equipment after they see lightning or hear thunder. As others have suggested above home owners insurance coverage is key. The equipment can be replaced your life cannot be!
 

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When my place got struck, the insurance agent wanted to "verify functionability"(is that even a word?!) of my equipment. Computers were easy, they all stopped turning on. The AV equip was a bit harder as it didn't kill the items immediately. My arguement to the insurance guy was "severely altered expected lifespan" and sure enough within a week all the devices bit the dust. It also helped that i had a video tape of the whole place specifically for insurance. Pictures are really worth a thousand words (or in my case, a few thousand dollars)


And yes, tripp lite and CyberPower are notorious for not paying out on their guarantees on equipment. In business practice though, APC will never deny if their stuff fails. They make millions on a reputation. APC is all i will put in my equipment racks. (TVSS is LEA technologies, industrial grade)
 
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