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I am planning to put a plasma on a wall that separates my townhouse unit from the neighbors unit. I plan to use a fully articulating wall mount. I've seen a few on Amazon and Monoprice that would do the job.


One issue is that I am not sure where I will want the display on the wall, and probably won't know until I'm trying it out. What I may do in that case is use a big table to experiment left and right and up and down (a big table will allow my centre channel speaker to sit vertically underneath).


I wonder if I eventually mount it on the wall, should I simply:


1) use concrete screws?


2) Or should I throw up a thick piece of plywood and then install the wall mount on that (you won't see it much behind the TV).


3) build a sort of stand that the wall-mount ...mounts too.


All options will allow my centre channel to sit vertically underneath along with an AV stand or two, and/or my subwoofer.


My front speakers are PSB T65's and a C60 centre (I may replace the C60 with a T55 or T65). Subwoofer is a Mirage BPS-400. AV stand is about 34" high while the T65's are almost 40" high. The C60 is shorter than the T65's but I won't leave it on the ground.


TV will be a 55 or 60" Panasonic ST30.


thanks in advance for any feedback,

 

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I recently mounted 2 55" panels on concrete at work. LCD if it matters.


Both mounts came with 4 x 3" lag bolts and plastic wall anchors (3/8). The idea is to use the lag bolts alone if mounting in studs, and the anchors if mounting in concrete.


Both mounts were tilt/swivel.


I think the 3" lag bolts were overkill myself, although by the time you get through the drywall, and taking in to consideration the thickness of the mount, you may only have 2" inside the concrete.


After installing the first one, I grabbed the mount and did a couple of chinups, then tried to rip it off the wall....not a chance in Hell. I'm 6ft, 180lbs and couldnt budge it.


I dont think there is any need for a piece of plywood behind the panel, and even if it were 1" thick plywood, I wouldnt trust mounting anything to the plywood alone. I would also expect your condo walls to be at least 4" of poured concrete thick.


Cheers


Pete
 

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You have studs in front of the concrete? I am not sure my wall has full studs, it may just have drywall on top of the concrete cinder block dividing wall...hence my idea of using tap-cons. Although, I was although thinking of a few other weird creative idea's including attaching something to the ceiling....anyways...


Which wall-mounts did you install?
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by cpc /forum/post/20964540


You have studs in front of the concrete? I am not sure my wall has full studs, it may just have drywall on top of the concrete cinder block dividing wall...hence my idea of using tap-cons. Although, I was although thinking of a few other weird creative idea's including attaching something to the ceiling....anyways...


Which wall-mounts did you install?

No, no studs. Bare concrete. Drill 3/8 hole in concrete, insert plug, screw in lag bolts.


Fogert the name of the mounts, but they were around $150.00 at Tigerdirect. Nothing fancy.
 

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Yes, that one looks familiar. You can see the lag bolts and plugs in the hardware photo (upper right side).


Oh, just as a data point, my condo has drywall directly over concrete, no studs. My interior dividing walls are 4" thick (I know this because I drilled through one for a cable run) so I would expect the walls between units are at least 4", if not 6" thick.
 

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Ok, fair enough. I am going to come up with something that will work. It's nice to have the TV up in the air and then your AV equipment and speakers, subs etc. you can do with them as you please.
 

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If it is not studded there are probably furring strips which are 1" to attach the drywall to the concrete. If that is the case then you might have an issue fishing wires or putting in power if you planned on that. Just make sure that you drill through the furring strips to get to the concrete, if you don't then you will break the drywall when you tighten the lag bolts down. Good luck with mounting your television!
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Looks like the drywall is attached to the concrete with 1" furring strips or similar. In this new townhouse, there were holes on the wall where some screws/nails had been where the former owners had things hanging on the wall. I stuck a mini-screwdriver in and I hit concrete at less than 1 and 1/2" from the outside surface of the drywall ...So I guess I have to figure out how I would want to mount a TV mount on this wall. Concrete screws or plugs in the concrete for the lag bolts. If it's a cinder block wall, that means there will only be the thickness of the wall of the cinder block for the bolt to hold on to.
 

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Well, a Kanto full motion FMX3 was on sale at costco.ca today so I bit the bullet and bought it. It's on the way. It can be mounted to studs 16" to 24" apart or concrete and has loads of flexibility for mounting and in how it works. Rated for 130 LBS. and the 60ST30 it's intended for will be 80 LBS. Looks good. Now to plan how to mount the mount.

http://www.costco.ca/Browse/PopupVie...906&lang=en-CA


I think I messed up. I think my wall is cinder blocks and the mount instructions say you can't mount to that. It is finished with drywall. I am thinking I could use properly rated toggle bolts directly or mount a piece of 1/2" or 3/4" plywood using toggle bolts and then mount the tv wall mount onto the piece of plywood. Also could attach the plywood at the ceiling.
 

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I am pretty sure my wall is made of blocks and where there are voids, the thickness of the block is 1 and 1/8" to 1 and 1/4". I think they are concrete blocks. It's possible they are cinder blocks, but they look gray like concrete so I am guessing they are in fact concrete. I will do some more research into what the blocks in my walls are before I continue.


The instructions for this mount say in order to install on concrete you need at least 3" thick concrete and the anchors provided are a little shorter than 2.5". The mount extends out from the wall 28". It says your wall must be able to support 5 times the weight of the mount and TV. I think the mount and TV are at least 140 LBS. up to 150 LBS. The TV it self is 80 LBS. The reason the wall has to support 5 times that is that when extended the full 28" the mount acts like a lever, prying on the attaching bolts, anchors, concrete screws, lag bolts or what have you. There are many slots to use for mounting, and the weight rating for concrete screws, which only need 1 and 1/4" of depth, seem to be very high. A 1/4" concrete screw (Cobra brand) has the following ratings:


Diameter screw size 1/4 drill size ‘’ 3/16’’ Minimum embedment 1-1/4’’


and


Pull max 1400 lbs Pull safe 350 lbs Shear max 1700 lbs Shear safe 425 lbs


Seems to me that if I use at least 6 of these at the top stress points of the mount I will have overkill. Does this seem right?


EDIT - According to Cobra, a company who makes concrete screws, I can't expect the same holding strength if I use concrete screws in blocks even if they are concrete block, because the blocks are porous.


So toggle bolts or some other solution.
 
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