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http://www.hidef.com/hddvd.html


HD-DVDS



HD-DVDs - Skywalker will be there:

As Everyone knows: Lucasfilm will wait for HD-DvDs



Is it possible for any one entity to define an era of motion pictures? Just ask George Lucas. The visionary who has sparked a revolution in Hollywood by choosing high definition digital technology to shoot the next installment of Hollywood's holy grail, will probably single handedly usher in the next wave of home video.


While traditionalists cry foul Georgy will shoot Episode II probably between 80%-99% hidef, and if that wasn't enough to promote hidef, Episode I Producer Rick McCallum, who has recently become the "wingman" of high definition digital movies announced in an interview for German broadcaster n-tv, that Lucasfilm will wait for the next-generation high-definition DVD format (HD-DVDs - expected in the next two years) before releasing the Star Wars Saga on anything other than VHS or Laserdisc.


The news comes packaged in a one two whallop. As the newly remastered Indiana Jones Trilogy is released on Laserdisc as well as VHS but with no sign of a DVD version, it only suggests another massive punch on behalf of HD-DvDs.


Needless to say we think this will put a wee bit of a furor in the HD-DVD sales once released. Nothing like 60 million hungry fans rushing to purchase high definition digital versatile discs to send your HiDef stock into orbit. McCallum went on to confirm comments from George Lucas that the Star Wars movies would not be released on HD-DVD until after Episode 3 is released in cinemas, which is expected to take place in 2005.


But nothing prepared us for McCallum's next endorsement of the high definition DVDs, he went on to say: "we expect a new wave of technology to exist in a year - a year and a half".


Seeing as how they are shooting Episode one in HiDef, one can't surmize anything other than Lucasfilm plans leap frog the current DVD format completely and invest heavily in the HD-DVD format to be introduced in the next few years.


We can't wait to see what our friends at Pioneer have to say about this one.



HD-DVDs

Another major makes the transition.


January 11, 2000 LG Electronics (which owns Zenith) has developed a blue-laser DVD player with quadrupled capacity designed to facilitate high-definition digital movies. Although LG Electronics is not the only major manufacturer working on this little puppy, it still puts Zenith out of the gate.


Pioneer displayed a HDDVD player at this years CES which was a sight to behold but what does all this mean? It means 18-27 gigabytes in a single layer on a single side-- four times the 4.7GB single-side/single-layer capacity we've got now.


Expect to see these bad boys on the shelves in the next few years. Don't worry that doesn't mean your current DVDs will go the way of the Beta and VHS tapes - HD-DVD players will be able to playback standard definition DVDs as well as CDs.


One thing is for certain, as Sony, Pioneer, Philips, and the like get ready to do battle the competition will ensure that these HD-DvDs will be in your stores as soon as possible.


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Sounds good, but 18 gigs will not cut it. I figure you need twice that. Average compressed 2 hour movie will be around 18 gigs, but everyone will expect the same features that DVD has, which includes alternate audio tracks and bonus footage. I just hope they don't jump the gun with a format that does not have enough capacity (I doubt they would though).


This is partly why I refuse to spend multi thousands on a DVD player. DVD players are going to be completely worthless (to us) pretty soon. Definitely less than 5 years, but probably more like 2 years.

 

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How about an inexpensive (ruby laser) player with first production HD DVD

disks capable of 38 Gbytes per side with 100 Gb potential? This is the

promise of the Fluorescent Multilayer Disk (FMD) developed by Constellation 3D and now entering the production engineering phase with a leading optical disk maker. Too good to be true? Not so. Here's a link to their site:

http://www.c-3d.net/press_frameset2.html
 

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Constellation 3D's florescent multilayer discs are a great format for playback, but there's no way to make them recordable. The fact that the CD and DVD formats eventually spawned recordable variants is very important to their long-term existence.

 

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A couple comments:


- It's very likely that Episode I will be available on DVD this fall, probably by Thanksgiving. So they're probably just talking about the original three. Not that I understand why anyone would buy Episode I in ANY format, but that's another topic...


- Are there any stats on Zenith's blue laser? From what I understand, the problem has often been getting 10K hours out of them reliably.


- That's 18GB per layer per side -- so 36GB if you assume dual-layer, like current DVDs


- If I have to buy a new player and upgrade my DVD collection after a measly three years I'm gonna be pissed. I don't see HD-DVD being here within "year - a year and a half".


- This implies that all sorts of copy-protection questions are answered. I don't see HD-DVD making a big splash if the studios are dragging their heels. And I haven't seen ANY studio (Fox included) show much in the way of enthusiasm for bringing HD content to consumers.
 

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In the recent HT magazine, it again quotes the specs on Sony's DVD Blue HD Recordable deck that was shown at the recent CES;


22 GB per layer with a data transfer rate of up to 35 MBPS. This compares to existing DVD at 4.7 GB per layer and up to 10 MBPS.


The timeframe is 2 to 3 years.


Lee
 

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Quote:
Originally posted by balazer:
Constellation 3D's florescent multilayer discs are a great format for playback, but there's no way to make them recordable. The fact that the CD and DVD formats eventually spawned recordable variants is very important to their long-term existence.

I think Constellation 3D's florescent multilayer discs have a LOT of promise. These guys had the FIRST working HD disc player that I am aware of. It was demonstrated at CES or before CES. At that time, they also mentioned they were working on a recordable version, so your statement that there is no way to make them recordable is not accurate (without knowing the issues and costs involved -- just what the company stated in a press release). I'm still trying to figure out why these guys have gotten so little attention. They are basically ready for production right now.
 

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Just some data for the thread. HD uses up to 7.5 Gbyte/hour (search if you'd like the forumula). Point being that you could squeeze a normal movie onto three current DVD's. Makes you wonder if you could dump HD PVR to a series of DVD Ram disks. Bet that makes Hollywood sweat....


Mike


 

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Quote:
They are basically ready for production right now.
Not according to the stockholders report I recently read. Mass production is a ways off.




------------------

Frank...

Turn off the TV and read these books those in power DON'T want you to read...
 
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