AVS Forum banner
1 - 20 of 45 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,028 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·

I am looking to build an HTPC, but have hit a bit of a quagmire.

 

Since I am a DirecTV user (wife is vehemently opposed to switching to Comcast and I somewhat agree with her), tuner cards are not an option for integrating live tv/pvr capabilities into the HTPC.  I do have a Happaugue WinTV-HVR-950Q USB tuner stick for OTA transmissions which I have used with my laptop while on the road/in the city, but it won't pick up anything at home without a good rooftop antenna (also a no go with the wife; I will admit, they do look kind of ugly and we live in a town house so I would probably have to go thru the hassle of getting it approved by the HoA).  So, I started researching capture devices that could be treated as if they were a tuner by the various PVR software programs (WMC, SageTV, NextPVR, MediaPortal, etc.).

 

The first one I came across was the Hauppauge HD PVR model 1212.  The pro's for this option are that it can capture HD video (max. resolution 1080i/720p60) using an H.264 encoder with multiple format options at up to 13.5Mbps, surround sound (max. 5.1 channels) which it encodes as AC3, and most of the PVR software options support it, including WMC.  The cons are that it can't do 1080p at all and offers no HDMI connection for capturing non-copy protected content without the need for an analog to digital conversion  This is compounded by the fact that, in most cases, the source I would want to capture is digital so it is actually having to be converted from digital to analog (component) to be captured at which point it is converted back to digital.  So the recording will never be quite as good as the original source.  Also, because it requires an optical SPDIF cable to get surround sound, it is limited to stereo PCM or one of the lossy 5.1 formats (it can't do 5.1/7.1 lossless).  This isn't necessarily that big of a deal since most of the sources that I would want to capture with this device do not have 5.1/7.1 channel lossless audio anyways.  There are better methods of recording from Blu-ray disc if that is the goal.

 

The second option I came across was the Hauppauge Colossus model 1414.  This is basically the equivalent of the HD PVR, except as a PCI express card rather than an external USB 2.0 device.  It does have a couple advantages over the HD PVR: 1) it has an HDMI input which can be used for capturing non-copy protected content (XBox360, camcorder with HDMI out, etc.) and 2) it can record at up to 20 Mbps.  Like the HD PVR, it can capture 5.1 channel surround sound and encode it as AC3 in the recording.  And it is also compatible with almost all PVR software programs including WMC.  Unfortunately, like the HD PVR, it can only record at a max. resolution of 1080i/720p60 (no 1080p at all) and, afaik, is limited to 5.1 surround sound despite the HDMI input (which should technically be capable of more channels and formats).  Still, if you have the PCI express slot available, it is a small step above the HD PVR.

 

The third option I found was the Elgato EyeTV.  This is basically the Mac-only equivalent of the HD PVR.  While a decent option for Mac owners (its included software is somewhat better looking than the WinTV software included with the HD PVR/Colossus), the fact that it only runs on OSX, means that it has far less compatibility with the major 3rd party media center programs.  Like the HD PVR, it uses the USB 2.0 interface and does not have an HDMI input.  Its max. resolution is 1080i/720p (no 1080p at all) and its max bit rate is 15 Mbps.  Unlike the HD PVR, it can only capture stereo (AAC-LC).  With no real difference in video capture quality between the EyeTV and the HD PVR, no surround sound, and a lack of 3rd party media center support, I crossed this option off of the list, though I have been keeping an eye on Elgato for new and improved products due to the good reviews Mac users have given Elgato's devices.

 

At the time I did the initial research these were pretty much the only 3 options for an HD video capture device that would work with full PVR capabilities (EPG compatible with ability to schedule recordings ahead of time).  While none of them had everything I was looking for, I had pretty much decided to go with the Colossus and/or HD PVR model 1212.  I had planned to go with WMC as the PVR software with either/both of these devices serving as "tuners".

 

Then came news of the impending release of the Hauppauge HD PVR 2 Gaming Edition model 1480, which added an HDMI input and pass thru with the ability to record 1080p30 from a 1080p60 source, while passing 1080p60 thru to your display.  However, due to the belief that WMC would not be supported by Windows 8, no WMC support was built into the driver for the HD PVR 2.  Despite the fact that Microsoft has since decided to include WMC with Windows 8 Pro w/ Media Center (at additional cost), it does not appear that there will be any development from either Hauppauge or Microsoft that would allow the HD PVR 2 to be used as a tuner in WMC.  So, the model 1480 was 1 step forward in terms of video quality, but 1 step back in terms of software compatibility.  Also, the model 1480 lacks support for surround sound.  So, I was still leaning towards going with the Colossus and/or HD PVR model 1212.

 

Shortly after the release of the HD PVR 2 Gaming Edition model 1480 came the release of the HD PVR 2 model 1512 and HD PVR 2 Gaming Edition Plus model 1504.  Both are similar to the model 1480, except that they do support 5.1 channel surround sound over HDMI as well as toslink (optical SPDIF).  The main differences between the two models being the accessories and software included.  The model 1512 includes an IR blaster, a component cable for connecting to a set top box, and a copy of the WinTV software for scheduling recordings that the 1504 does not include.  Meanwhile, the model 1504 includes cables for connecting the Xbox360 and PS3 and a free download for some Mac compatible software that the model 1512 does not.  Like the model 1480, there are no drivers available that would allow you to use them as a tuner in WMC (and it is looking like there may never be).  However, 3rd party and open source media center programs have started to develope drivers that will work for these devices.  One already exists for MePo, though it is not officially supported yet.  I also have seen at least one user of JRiver that has managed to get his working with assistance from the JRiver developer in charge of their Live TV and PVR functionality.  MePo's Live TV/PVR software has already surpassed WMC's capabilites in many ways, though it is not quite as simple to set up.  And, JRiver seems to be coming along on this front as well.  It already has the best pure audio capabilities, but I would currently rate its TV integration at #3 behind MePo and WMC.

 

This opened a whole new can of worms.  Originally i was pretty much set on using WMC for Live TV/PVR functionality. I hadn't decided whther to use WMC exclusively or use a combination of XBMC and WMC.  But, with development of WMC seemingly nonexistent, I can't really justify making a hardware decision based on WMC compatibilty anymore.  And, if you put WMC compatibility aside, it's clear that the HD PVR 2 model 1504 and 1512 are superior to the model 1212 and Colossus.

 

However, I still haven't convinced myself that even 1080p30 recordings would be satisfactory in the long run.  While certainly better than 1080i, I have heard some experts/quasi-experts say that 30 fps isn't really good for anything.  They say that it won't look right for movies/tv shows that were originally sourced at 24 fps (which I do occasionally watch from DirecTV).  They also say it is too slow for sports footage and fast-action tv shows, resulting in motion blur.  Some suggest that you are better off going with 720p60 for this kind of content.  But, who wants to sacrifice that much resolution?

 

So now I am almost back to square one, except that I have expanded my search for any type of HD capture device, even if there is absolutely zero Live TV/PVR support.  I figure that since getting rid of the DirecTV receivers was never really an option anyway, why not just use them for normal tv watching/recording and just get the best video capture hardware available for archiving the content on the DVR during off hours.  All I would have to do is set the DVR up to playback shows and manually set the capture device to record.  Since DirecTV already has an app that can be used to control the DVR remotely and I can use a remote desktop application to tell the capture device when to start/stop recording, this could work.

 

With that in mind, I have researched just about any type of capture device I can find.  I've looked at the Roxio Game Capture Pro HD, the Elgato Game Capture HD, the Avermedia Live Gamer HD, Live Gamer HD 2, Live Gamer HD Portable, the Hauppauge HD PVR Rocket, and the Blackmagic Design Intensity USB 3.0/Thunderbolt.  All will allow capture via both HDMI and component.  All suffer from the same 1080p30 limit and none support 1080p24.  Also, none of them will do surround sound (all are stereo only).  And as intriguing as some of the added features that a few of them have (i.e. the Elgato has flashback recording, while the Live Gamer HD 2, Live Gamer HD portable, and HD PVR Rocket can all record to removable media without needing to be connected to the PC), none of them really fit my needs any better than the HD PVR 2 model 1512.

 

Just in the last week or two I heard about a new capture device from Avermedia called the ExtremeCap U3.  This appears to be yet another step in the right direction...it can capture both 1080p24 and 1080p60.  It also uses USB 3.0, which is considerably faster than USB 2.0.  However, it is again crippled by a lack of surround sound support, being limited to stereo.  However, this leads me to a question...  Is it possible to capture video using one device and audio with another device and then combine the two feeds together without too much time/effort?  Obviously this is possible on the professional level using professional equipment and software, but I'm not sure if it could be done with the ExtremeCap U3 for video and an HD PVR/Colossus or possibly a dedicated audio capture device capable of 5.1/7.1 lossless audio capture for audio.  Would there be a way to guarantee A/V sync in this setup?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,028 Posts
Discussion Starter · #2 ·

Realized that my post was extremely long, which would likely lead to nobody taking the time to read all of it.  And, therefore, nobody who might be able to answer the question I ask at the end would ever see it.  So, here is the condensed version...

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by HockeyoAJB  /t/1520027/hd-video-capture-device-...-5-1-7-1-channel-lossless-audio#post_24413923


...

 

Just in the last week or two I heard about a new capture device from Avermedia called the ExtremeCap U3.  This appears to be yet another step in the right direction...it can capture both 1080p24 and 1080p60.  It also uses USB 3.0, which is considerably faster than USB 2.0.  However, it is again crippled by a lack of surround sound support, being limited to stereo.  This leads me to a question...  Is it possible to capture video using one device and audio with another device and then combine the two feeds together without too much time/effort?  Obviously this is possible on the professional level using professional equipment and software, but I'm not sure if it could be done with the ExtremeCap U3 for video and an HD PVR/Colossus or possibly a dedicated audio capture device capable of 5.1/7.1 lossless audio capture for audio.  Would there be a way to guarantee A/V sync in this setup?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
26 Posts

Realized that my post was extremely long, which would likely lead to nobody taking the time to read all of it.  And, therefore, nobody who might be able to answer the question I ask at the end would ever see it.  So, here is the condensed version...

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by HockeyoAJB  /t/1520027/hd-video-capture-device-...-5-1-7-1-channel-lossless-audio#post_24413923


...

 

Just in the last week or two I heard about a new capture device from Avermedia called the ExtremeCap U3.  This appears to be yet another step in the right direction...it can capture both 1080p24 and 1080p60.  It also uses USB 3.0, which is considerably faster than USB 2.0.  However, it is again crippled by a lack of surround sound support, being limited to stereo.  This leads me to a question...  Is it possible to capture video using one device and audio with another device and then combine the two feeds together without too much time/effort?  Obviously this is possible on the professional level using professional equipment and software, but I'm not sure if it could be done with the ExtremeCap U3 for video and an HD PVR/Colossus or possibly a dedicated audio capture device capable of 5.1/7.1 lossless audio capture for audio.  Would there be a way to guarantee A/V sync in this setup?
I know this thread is a few months old but was wondering what you decided on. I'm in the market for a new capture device and am wanting 1080p as well as 5.1 audio. I currently have a BMI Pro. It's a great card but obviously is lacking decent audio capture.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,028 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I know this thread is a few months old but was wondering what you decided on. I'm in the market for a new capture device and am wanting 1080p as well as 5.1 audio. I currently have a BMI Pro. It's a great card but obviously is lacking decent audio capture.
I put this decision on the back burner for now, but have been keeping a close eye on new developments. There hasn't really been much change since my original post with regards to the capabilities of the consumer level capture devices. One or two portable models have been released that can use internal storage, but the capture quality and PVR software compatibility of these devices hasn't changed in the past few months. From all of the reviews I have read, it still seems that the best capture device for you depends on what features are most important to you.

If your main concern is the highest possible video capture quality for gaming or short video clips and you are ok with stereo audio and zero 3rd party PVR software compatibility then it seems that the Elegato Game Capture HD is the best option currently available.

If you need 5.1 audio, 3rd party PVR software compatibility, and/or want to be able to make recordings that are longer than 1 hour without having to create two files and then splice them together then you will need one of the Hauppauge devices.

I have actually expanded my search to prosumer capture devices, mostly to see what might be available to consumers at a more reasonable price in the next year or so. If money was no object, my dream setup would be a new Mac Pro (roughly $10K configured the way I would want it) running both OSX Mavericks and Windows 8.1, using Final Cut Pro X as the capture/editing software, an AJA io4K ($2K device capable of capturing uncompressed 4K60p video w/ up to 8 channels of embedded audio via. HDMI), and two LaCie Little Big Disk Thunderbolt2 1TB drives for accessible storage. I'd use cheaper, slower drives for backup. The LaCie's are only necessary for capture and playback since they are the only ones with fast enough read/write speeds to do it in real time. Obviously, this is just a pipe dream.

Coming back to reality, my plan is to wait and see what the next generation of capture devices from Hauppauge and Elegato look like. Hopefully, we'll see devices that can capture at least 1080p60 w/ 5.1 audio. And, hopefully, the device manufacturers and the PVR software developers will put more effort into supporting each others products like they did with the original HD PVR and Colossus. This last generation seemed to be geared almost exclusively towards video game capture. We need another good set-top box PVR for those looking to "cut the cord".
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,028 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
What source do you have that needs "higher" than 1080i60 and DD audio?
I wouldn't say that I need it, but there are a couple scenarios where it would be beneficial...

1) Recording next gen console game play at full resolution and frame rate with the included surround sound audio. Yes, the PS4 and XboxOne have built-in game recorders but they are not full resolution and frame rate. They also have limited recording lengths and editing features. Unless I am mistaken, they are capable of rendering game play at 1080p60. Cutting the frame rate in half or reducing the spatial resolution in order to keep the frame rate at 60 fps are compromises that we should not have to make at the capturing stage. Obviously, you would likely have to sacrifice one or the other when you upload the recording, but it should be possible to keep a full quality recording archived for your own viewing and or the day when streaming it at full quality becomes more feasible.

2) Archiving 1080p24 content from the DirecTV DVR. Maybe this isn't technically allowed, but many people would like to be able to archive their DVR recordings in the event that their current DVR has a hard drive malfunction or they simply want to upgrade their DVR. AFAIK, most current capture devices don't do well with 24 fps content. I suppose you could interlace it and use 3:2 pulldown to convert to/from 1080i60, but I'm not sure how good of a job the DirecTV box does on its end of this. Also, wouldn't it assume that the video was originally 1080i60 when you go to play it back, so you would have to force it to convert to 1080p24?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
23,131 Posts
Gaming aside, that seems like an awful lot of work to archive a very inferior copy of something you DVR'd, not only is it compressed twice (once by DTV, and once by your capture device) it's overcompressed in the first place by DTV, and likely not OAR, and quite possibly has commercials or banners in it. Seems like it would be much easier/better to just get the Blu-ray if it's really worth keeping.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,028 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 · (Edited)
Gaming aside, that seems like an awful lot of work to archive a very inferior copy of something you DVR'd, not only is it compressed twice (once by DTV, and once by your capture device) it's overcompressed in the first place by DTV, and likely not OAR, and quite possibly has commercials or banners in it. Seems like it would be much easier/better to just get the Blu-ray if it's really worth keeping.
If you were only using it to archive 1080p24 movies from DirecTV then I'd probably agree with you on the ease of use/quality issues as compared to just buying it on Blu-Ray. However, if you have a couple years worth of DirecTV recordings that you want to archive, which are a mix of 480p, 720p, 1080i, and 1080p24, it would be nice to be able to offload them to your personal media server without having to determine which ones are 1080p24, buying them on Blu-Ray, and then deleting them from the DVR before archiving everything else. When you are upgrading your DVR box, you don't really want to have to sit there and determine which movies are worth purchasing on Blu-Ray, which you never intend to watch again, and which you would watch again but aren't willing to pay full price for and might be willing to just covert to 1080i60 before capture. It would be nice to be able to just archive it all at the native resolution and frame rate and decide what is worth purchasing and what can just be deleted when time allows.

I haven't had to go thru this exact scenario yet as I only recently upgraded to an HD DVR (Genie model) from an SD DVR. But I did just go through a DVR archival process. In my case, I didn't have any issues such as these because the tools to capture SD video have existed for quite some time. However, the experience has made me aware of the fact that the tools to do this for HD video w/ surround sound are somewhat lacking at this point in time (unless you go into the professional video capture and editing arena).

Also, it's not just about archival for when you replace a DVR. It's also about greater accessibility and integration of live/recorded TV into your home. One of the things I love about the new DirecTV DVR is the ability to use our iPads (with the DirecTV app) to watch live TV/recordings in bed or on the deck. However, I have noticed that the shows you can do this with are somewhat limited. For example, it won't let me watch the World Cup games on my iPad. Those have to be watched on a TV that is connected to a DirecTV box. (Note: I have tried the WatchESPN app as well, but DirecTV is not one of the supported providers). I could get around this by purchasing a Slingbox, but it would be nice to avoid having to get yet another single-purpose device, and have to deal with yet another UI, IR blasters, etc. Plus, unless I am mistaken, Slingbox requires an internet connection and their servers have to be up for you to be able to connect to your content, even if you are in the same network. For a while there, I wasn't sure if buying one would be prudent due to the legal battles they were going through. Using a capture device to incorporate live/recorded tv into your home can actually be cheaper, easier, and less restrictive than most other alternatives, if you are somewhat computer literate.

For now, the current generation of consumer level HD video capture devices can handle sports footage through DirecTV, since it is almost all 720p60. However, in addition to being able to handle current 1080p24 content without multiple conversions, it would be nice to have some level of future-proofing built in just in case 1080p60 content begins to be broadcast in the next year or two. Maybe that won't happen, but it doesn't seem completely out of the realm of possibilities with 4K broadcast supposedly being on the horizon.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
612 Posts
As much as I despise Comcast there is no way I would ever pay for satellite. That being said... don't bother with any of the external capture devices. I have a HD PVR 2 GE and it's such a piece of crap. You have to use super old firmware/drivers to even get it work at all and those old firmware/drivers have an audio issue with every couple of seconds the audio sounds like chipmunks. Once you upgrade the firmware/drivers it flat out doesn't work at all.

From a consumer device perspective you're not going to find anything that does 1080p real well at any frame rate let alone higher resolutions. These devices might work better recording from a STB or Game Console but I use it for recording from another PC. I picked up an Avermedia Game Broadcaster HD PCIe C127 and it does what I want. A couple million times better than the HD PVR 2. I'd recommend looking into the Avermedia Game streaming PCIe devices or the BlackMagic HDMI/PCIe capture devices. Those would be the only two worth looking at unless you want to spend $15,000+ on commercial hardware encoders. Those will do 8K resolution at 45fps. :)

Another option would be a Nvidia Quadro Graphics card. I believe some of them support HDMI input and they probably do it a lot better than any other device. Obviously they're pretty expensive but you might be able to get away with a used one a couple generations old that will do everything you need.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
384 Posts
Any progress on your quest for a real HTPC Recorder---1080p/60 with AC3?

I am a noob with this, but I too want to archive Dtv shows--travel, concerts, etc from my DRV to a yet to be bought HTPC recorder and some shows saved to BD before the old HR20 breaks. I'll also want to edit out commercials--I assume I can use my Sony Vegas Movie Studio.

I currently have a Panasonic DVR but it's SD. Editing is a bit cumbersome--but it works.

Ron
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
23,131 Posts
I am a noob with this, but I too want to archive Dtv shows--travel, concerts, etc from my DRV to a yet to be bought HTPC recorder and some shows saved to BD before the old HR20 breaks. I'll also want to edit out commercials--I assume I can use my Sony Vegas Movie Studio.
None of those are going to be 1080p60. They'll probably all be 720p or 1080i, that's what all the networks broadcast.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
193 Posts
2017 now, is there now any way to capture 1080p and 5.1 audio?

UPDATE: Ok I see the Hauppauge 1512 HD-PVR 2 does 5.1 audio over HDMI now with latest drivers. Looks like this unit is from 2013. I know there have been quite a few advances in h.264 realtime chipsets so seems dated. Does anyone know the chipset on this unit? I could not find a teardown on the internet.

Looks like Hauppauge is only one out there doing 5.1 audio capture support. From reviews I read is that the PQ at max bitrate is very good so I assume the chipset even though dated is up to the task.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
46 Posts
That is re-write of my original post.
I have replaced my capture machine with Windows 7 x64 it performs well for AC3 capture.
Which most likely means that driver is not really Windows 10 fully ready !!!

As it does not deal correctly with DTS I have ever since returned the unit!

So far I only managed to find that one device:

HD CaptureU3.0 Skydigital Inc Digital Audio Capture and Recorder

Code:
[URL]https://www.amazon.co.uk/HD-Capture-CaptureU3-0-Skydigital-Recorder/dp/B00A3NLDS2[/URL]
Tested with Pioneer Laserdisc & SY-P295N CV/SV to HDMI Converter and Scaler with Audio

Code:
http://www.cypeurope.com/store/store/app/product/SY-P295N/CVSV-to-HDMI-Converter-and-Scaler-with-Audio-


SY-P295N outputs perfect HDMI stream (which I can watch on TV / Onkyo TX-NR609 directly OR via HDMI splitter iSolem [1080P FULL HD] 1x2 3D HDMI Switch Box (1 Input x 2 Output)

Code:
[URL]https://www.amazon.co.uk/iSolem-1080P-Switch-Input-Output/dp/B006KZBC92[/URL]
Supplied capture software is most odd, it has two sections in Encoder tab:



Seems that .ts for DTV is not used at all in this software with that device.
It only uses Analog section (most odd!)
It does hardware Intel® Quick Sync Video H.264 Encoder MFT OR NVIDIA H.264 Encoder MFT encoding on-fly, but on Ultrabook with i5-3427U - Intel HD4000 with the small samples I had no problems at all - bitrate if selectable)
Not the best encoder, but considering quality of the source, more than good enough!

To record the video/AC3 6ch best is to chose mkv (does not matter what is audio encoder, as it will recognize & record AC3 anyway)

I have tested other sources (DVD via HDMI from Professional HHB UDP-68 player & AC3 channels from Gigablue satellite unit), HDCP is stripped completely - tested direct connection, no need for splitter

Sample of AC3 recorded clip is here

To record DTS, one must chose avi & PCM in Audio Encoder (that is a bug in software, does not recognize correctly DTS stream)
Recorded clip does play back fine on hardware decoder (Onkyo TX-NR609)

But on PC (VLC) it does play static & Mediainfo recognizes it audio as PCM.
MPL-HC with build in AC3filter plays it fine 6 ch, but still shows PCM.

So the easiest is to extract audio with ffmpeg
Code:
ffmpeg -i DTS_capture.AVI -c copy extracted_dts.wav
Then process extracted_dts.wav with wav2dts :laugh: from tebasuna51 on HA forum
and just create .mkv with MKVToolNix GUI

Good capture, captured avi is here

But sadly that works only for short capture, my test was under 2 min long.
Capture of over 50 min seems to have PCM audio that can not be processed the same way

So all in all the hardware is OK if you need to do AC3 only capture! (which is what HD PVR 2 does anyway)

sebus
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
46 Posts
There is also Magewell USB Capture HDMI One channel HD capture dongle
Part number:32011

Code:
http://www.magewell.com/usb-capture-hdmi
but so far could not figure what format it outputs

sebus
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
46 Posts
INOGENI 4K2USB3 4K HDMI to USB 3.0 Converter

Code:
https://www.amazon.com/INOGENI-4K2USB3-HDMI-USB-Converter/dp/B01AQ7HQ62

states:

  • Uncompressed Video & Audio Capture
  • Ideal for Streaming & Videoconferencing
  • HDMI Input
  • Up to 2160p30 Video
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,050 Posts
INOGENI 4K2USB3 4K HDMI to USB 3.0 Converter

Code:
https://www.amazon.com/INOGENI-4K2USB3-HDMI-USB-Converter/dp/B01AQ7HQ62
states:

  • Uncompressed Video & Audio Capture
  • Ideal for Streaming & Videoconferencing
  • HDMI Input
  • Up to 2160p30 Video
This device only outputs 2-channel LPCM audio. Not worth the money, IMHO.

There is also Magewell USB Capture HDMI One channel HD capture dongle
Part number:32011

Code:
http://www.magewell.com/usb-capture-hdmi
but so far could not figure what format it outputs

sebus
This appears to output only a single audio channel. Absolutely worthless.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
46 Posts
The complexity isn't the issue. It all boils down to copyright infringement, piracy, and the DCMA.
copyright infringement, piracy, and the DCMA

For these one will rip DVD/BD, record directly in Enigma 2 from sat box etc

Why would anybody need to use HDMI?

Personally I need HDMI to capture Laserdisc (before technology completely disappears!)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,050 Posts
copyright infringement, piracy, and the DCMA

For these one will rip DVD/BD, record directly in Enigma 2 from sat box etc

Why would anybody need to use HDMI?

Personally I need HDMI to capture Laserdisc (before technology completely disappears!)
That would be a pretty good trick considering there was never a laserdisc player made that had an HDMI output. The format was defunct long before the HDMI standard was developed.
 
1 - 20 of 45 Posts
Top