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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi All,

I just upgraded to a 4K tv and receiver. I currently have HDMI 1.4 cables and those are working fine but just figured I would upgrade to HDMI 2.0 now for the extra bandwidth. And just to get it out of the way now rather than later. Everywhere I look for HDMI 2.0 cables of 18gb cables I just see a bunch of generic brands. Even on Monoprice I only see the redmere version. Are these cables just now sold that easily or am I looking wrong? I love Monoprice so willing to go with the redmere but was wondering everyones opinion of redmere. My cables would be about 6'-10'. Sorry if this is a dumb question, thanks for taking the time to help :)

Andy
 

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Redmere cables have a chip inside that's supposed to help ensure data throughput while using less copper. This means cables can be smaller and more flexible. 6' to 10' shouldn't be an issue as long as it's rated for 18Gbps. I haven't used any of Monoprice's high speed HDMI cables, but plenty of their other cables without issue.
 

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AndyKoopa said:
I just upgraded to a 4K tv and receiver. I currently have HDMI 1.4 cables and those are working fine but just figured I would upgrade to HDMI 2.0 now for the extra bandwidth.
No need to upgrade. According to HDMI.org:
HDMI 2.0 does not define new cables or new connectors. Current High Speed cables (Category 2 cables) are capable of carrying the increased bandwidth.
 

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Certified High Speed HDMI cables are all you need. As stated above, there is no such thing as an "HDMI 2.0" cable. Passive high speed cables can be certified (your "guarantee" that the cable will meet HDMI 1.4/2.0 specs for the length that you purchased) for up to 25'. Longer passive cables can be used but you might have to use a thicker gauge wire depending on what you want to push. Redmere cables are active cables in that they have a chipset in the sink end (tv side) that draws a little power. The advantage of that is you can have longer runs with a smaller gauge cable and have not stress on the input ends like you would with a thicker gauge cable. The disadvantage is that because they have a chipset, they could fail overtime like any other electronic device.

Is your new receiver HDMI 2.0 compliant? 4k doesn't guarantee that it has the current HDMI 2.0 chipsets (and possibly HDCP 2.2 as well).
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
yes, the receiver is 2.0. i purchased a Samsung 65HU8550 and Onkyo TX-NR636.

thanks everyone for your help, if the 1.4 cables are fine then I will just keep those. Just figured I would look for the 2.0 cables now rather than later :)
 

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There are no "1.4" or "2.0" cables.
You have either "high speed" or "standard speed".

The spec refers to hardware, not the cable(s).
 
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Yep. I suppose I could've been a little more clearer on the distinction between the cable nomenclature and the hardware specification. High speed HDMI cables, period (or until the industry goes to Display Port ;)).
 

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No harm, no foul... wasn't clarifying for you. We're on the same page.

Just making sure the OP understands. ;)
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
thanks guys, it makes sense to me. I will have on to what I have now, the cables I have now are Monoprice High Speed with Ethernet so I should be good. Just wanted to make sure I had upgraded everything and it looks like the cables are perfect anyways :)
 

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One last note, HDMI with ethernet is nice to have but it is basically useless because there aren't any consumer devices that I know of that support it. It's one of those specs that were never really adopted by the mfrs.
 
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