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You don't mention your market, however for the cost of Certified Premium High Speed cables which support UHD at 60Hz, HDR, >=18Gbps and YCbCr 4:4:4 - where the certified label with the QR code and the specific details of the supported bandwidth are more useful than marketing "HDMI 2" labels - it makes sense to buy and use these cables for all HDMI connections. That way you never need be concerned about having a cable interfere with your components' supported content (at least until you get to 8K and new audio formats).
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks. Will try to find one of those. I live in Argentina and options are very limited these days.
 

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If you scan the code it will tell you the model and manufacturer, so if you have concerns about a dodgy seller you can use that to verify the cable is what it says it is and not counterfeit. Some sketchy sellers will "recycle" the tag so they can sell a cheap cable at premium prices.
 

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@vazquezjm There are no HDMI cable versions. HDMI.org requested years ago that cable mfrs not label their cables with the version numbers as it was confusing to the consumer, among other reasons.

As mentioned above, for passive HDMI cables up to 25', just look for the registered name of Premium High Speed HDMI cables with ethernet, and the cable packaging needs to come with the QR label of authenticity which can be scanned as mentioned. 25' is the maximum certifiable length for passive cables. Any cable mfr can submit their cables for certification so pricing is competitive. However, certification is not a 100% guarantee that the cable will work with all setups and installations. It's mainly so that the consumer knows that the cable was tested and certified by standardized protocols and instrumentation approved by HDMI.org for the HDMI 2.0 option sets.

If your cable run is longer than 25', and you want to push 4k HDR and beyond, then you might want to consider a hybrid fiber cables. They are active and as such can not be certified. In fact, no active cable be it solid copper, fiber, or hybrid fiber can be certified by HDMI.org.
 

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My understanding is there are no HDMI "Fibre Optic" cables certified yet, correct me if not.
 

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My understanding is there are no HDMI "Fibre Optic" cables certified yet, correct me if not.
You are correct. And hybrid fiber cables will probably never be certified by an ATC (HDMI.org) because they are active, and HDMI.org does not have a certification program for any type of active cables, be they copper only, fiber, or hybrid fiber. It could be possible if all active cable mfrs used the same chipsets and design protocols but that's never going to happen.

Hybrid fiber cable mfrs typically have their own validation programs in-house (at least Ruipro does) but there is no standardized set of protocols or instrumentation across the mfrs. Some mfrs (Ruipro for example) use industry recognized instrumentation for validation but the QA/QC tolerances will vary from mfr to mfr. Some are much tighter than others.
 
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