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Yeah, if you can't find direct company info like a support page or any warranty information I'd look elsewhere. Amazon is just a reseller and doesn't check with the seller for accuracy of their product claims other than making them jump thru hoops to offer their products on Amazon.

If you think you need or want a certified hybrid fiber cable, I'd look to Ruipro (whose certified cable should be released by the end of the month), Cable Matters, or Maxonar. Certified copper-based UHS HDMI cables would either be Ruipro or Zeskit.
The price of the Phoossno 15m certified UHS cable is far cheaper than the uncertified Ruipro equivalent (about 30% cheaper). I am going to give it a try and will return to Amazon if there are problems within the return window.
I am particularly concerned with the heat on the Ruipro source connector. Heat is a killer for electronics. If the Phoossno works and runs cooler than the Ruipro, then I will keep the Phoossno. If not, I will return it.
 

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The price of the Phoossno 15m certified UHS cable is far cheaper than the uncertified Ruipro equivalent (about 30% cheaper). I am going to give it a try and will return to Amazon if there are problems within the return window.
I am particularly concerned with the heat on the Ruipro source connector. Heat is a killer for electronics. If the Phoossno works and runs cooler than the Ruipro, then I will keep the Phoossno. If not, I will return it.
Which ever cable works is the best cable for you. Reliability will be proven over time given the connected devices and the quality of the cable build. The "heat issue" with the Ruipro cables is not a proven problem with all Ruipro 8k cables. There are lots of the 8k cables in the wild and only a couple of issues that have been related to heat. But whether that heat is actually generated by the cable or is a transferred heat issue (due to poor heat dissipation design) from the GPU is unknown. I don't have HDMI 2.1 devices but have been using the 8k cables (Gen-3C) for months now for testing purposes and daily use and have not noticed any heat issues. Keep in mind that there are two components to cables. The body and the connector ends. The connector ends can be purchased from one or two mfrs that offer ATC certified connectors without proprietary modifications but the cable body can be made from cheaper components to keep costs down. Also some of these companies that offer low cost UHS HDMI cables buy in bulk, sell what they have, and then disappear so any warranty/support questions will be difficult to do.
 

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Which ever cable works is the best cable for you. Reliability will be proven over time given the connected devices and the quality of the cable build. The "heat issue" with the Ruipro cables is not a proven problem with all Ruipro 8k cables. There are lots of the 8k cables in the wild and only a couple of issues that have been related to heat. But whether that heat is actually generated by the cable or is a transferred heat issue (due to poor heat dissipation design) from the GPU is unknown. I don't have HDMI 2.1 devices but have been using the 8k cables (Gen-3C) for months now for testing purposes and daily use and have not noticed any heat issues. Keep in mind that there are two components to cables. The body and the connector ends. The connector ends can be purchased from one or two mfrs that offer ATC certified connectors without proprietary modifications but the cable body can be made from cheaper components to keep costs down. Also some of these companies that offer low cost UHS HDMI cables buy in bulk, sell what they have, and then disappear so any warranty/support questions will be difficult to do.
I definitely have a heat issue with the Ruipro uncertified 2.1 15m cable at the source connector end from a 3080 VP. It gets pretty hot to touch. Totally proven. Per Ruipro this is to be expected and is normal for this cable and it works fine at present but my concern is for how long.

My uncertified Ruipro 2.0 15m cable also was hot to touch and died after 4 years. Ruipro customer service is without doubt first rate and they replaced it at no cost to me without question under their lifetime warranty. Really very good customer service.

I will know more about relative heat issues very quickly once I install the Phoossno.
 

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I definitely have a heat issue with the Ruipro uncertified 2.1 15m cable at the source connector end from a 3080 VP. It gets pretty hot to touch. Totally proven. Per Ruipro this is to be expected and is normal for this cable and it works fine at present but my concern is for how long.

My uncertified Ruipro 2.0 15m cable also was hot to touch and died after 4 years. Ruipro customer service is without doubt first rate and they replaced it at no cost to me without question under their lifetime warranty. Really very good customer service.

I will know more about relative heat issues very quickly once I install the Phoossno.
Interesting. I have not seen that at all with my un-certified Ruipro cables (HDMI 2.0 options) or the 8k cables. Even their certified UHS HDMI cables (passive, HDMI 2.1 options) remain cool. If the cables really do heat up that much then hopefully their certified UHS HDMI cables will have better heat dissipation whether it comes from the chipset or is transferred. Sounds like pushing 40Gbps from source to sink is creating the heat.
 

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Interesting. I have not seen that at all with my un-certified Ruipro cables (HDMI 2.0 options) or the 8k cables. Even their certified UHS HDMI cables (passive, HDMI 2.1 options) remain cool. If the cables really do heat up that much then hopefully their certified UHS HDMI cables will have better heat dissipation whether it comes from the chipset or is transferred. Sounds like pushing 40Gbps from source to sink is creating the heat.
Just to be clear, my Ruipro cables (whether the uncertified 2.1 or 2.0 cables) do not heat up - the source connectors do.
 

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Just to be clear, my Ruipro cables (whether the uncertified 2.1 or 2.0 cables) do not heat up - the source connectors do.
Yeah, I understood that ;). When you say the source connector you are referring to the end connected to the GPU side of things and not the tv? Do you see any heat generated when the source has the HDMI 2.0 chipsets?
 

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Yeah, I understood that ;). When you say the source connector you are referring to the end connected to the GPU side of things and not the tv? Do you see any heat generated when the source has the HDMI 2.0 chipsets?
Correct, by source connector I mean the cable connector connected to my 3080 video processor not the cable connector connected to my 2.0 projector.

I am noticing the heat issues with the source connectors on both the 2.1 and 2.0 15m uncertified Ruipro AOC cables. I have not tried connecting a 2.0 source directly to the projector using a Ruipro 2.1 cable but did not seem to have heat issues for the last 4 years when I connected a 2.0 source to a 2.0 projector using the Ruipro 2.0 cable.
 

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The few reports from actual users seems to be favorable. The cable is still new so reliability (time of use) is still to be determined. Did you contact Ruipro? They are really good a replacing cables. If the cable worked before without issues, and the only change is the graphics card, then it could be an incompatibility with the card, and their 3C cable may work better. They are really good at working with the customer.
Ruipro sent me a replacement cable gen 3c. It works well and I don't have flicker anymore.
 

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Correct, by source connector I mean the cable connector connected to my 3080 video processor not the cable connector connected to my 2.0 projector.

I am noticing the heat issues with the source connectors on both the 2.1 and 2.0 15m uncertified Ruipro AOC cables. I have not tried connecting a 2.0 source directly to the projector using a Ruipro 2.1 cable but did not seem to have heat issues for the last 4 years when I connected a 2.0 source to a 2.0 projector using the Ruipro 2.0 cable.
If possible, I would try to connect an HDMI 2.0 source to the pj and see if there is heat generated at the source equal to what you see with the HDMI 2.1 source. If not, then the GPU is just putting out more heat than the cable is designed to handle, and that is one of the heat dissipation issues that Ruipro is trying to work around with. Other cable mfrs UHS HDMI hybrid fiber cables may have a better heat dissipation design than the current Ruipro cables do. Hopefully that's been resolved with the new certified UHS HDMI cables that are soon to be released. That being said, it would appear that the GPUs also need a better heat dissipation design as well. As a test, you could keep an external fan blowing on the HDMI port of your pc just to see if cooling it down helps. If it does, at least you'd have an answer but not necessarily a resolution to the problem.
 

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If possible, I would try to connect an HDMI 2.0 source to the pj and see if there is heat generated at the source equal to what you see with the HDMI 2.1 source. If not, then the GPU is just putting out more heat than the cable is designed to handle, and that is one of the heat dissipation issues that Ruipro is trying to work around with. Other cable mfrs UHS HDMI hybrid fiber cables may have a better heat dissipation design than the current Ruipro cables do. Hopefully that's been resolved with the new certified UHS HDMI cables that are soon to be released. That being said, it would appear that the GPUs also need a better heat dissipation design as well. As a test, you could keep an external fan blowing on the HDMI port of your pc just to see if cooling it down helps. If it does, at least you'd have an answer but not necessarily a resolution to the problem.
Thanks for the advice, Otto Pylot. Too much of an effort to connect a HDMI 2.0 source to the pj, have a fan blowing at the connector, etc. May have to do it later but for now, I am waiting for the certified 2.1 UHS AOC from phoossno and will see how it behaves vs the uncertified 2.1 Gen 3/C Ruipro AOC viz the heat at the source connector.
 

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Thanks for the advice, Otto Pylot. Too much of an effort to connect a HDMI 2.0 source to the pj, have a fan blowing at the connector, etc. May have to do it later but for now, I am waiting for the certified 2.1 UHS AOC from phoossno and will see how it behaves vs the uncertified 2.1 Gen 3/C Ruipro AOC viz the heat at the source connector.
As far as the pj goes, there have been reports of some pj's not playing nice with active cables over a given distance. The thought is that the HDMI port current fluctuates just enough to mess with the chipsets in the connector end of the HDMI cable. A voltage inserter, which goes between the HDMI port and the HDMI cable provides are more consistent current output which compensates for current fluctuations. Ruipro ships voltage inserters with their hybrid fiber cables so if you got one, it might be worth a shot. Sometimes they work and sometimes they don't but you can't hurt anything. All you need is an available USB port as a power source and connect it.
 

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As far as the pj goes, there have been reports of some pj's not playing nice with active cables over a given distance. The thought is that the HDMI port current fluctuates just enough to mess with the chipsets in the connector end of the HDMI cable. A voltage inserter, which goes between the HDMI port and the HDMI cable provides are more consistent current output which compensates for current fluctuations. Ruipro ships voltage inserters with their hybrid fiber cables so if you got one, it might be worth a shot. Sometimes they work and sometimes they don't but you can't hurt anything. All you need is an available USB port as a power source and connect it.
The uncertified 2.1 Ruipro Gen 3/C AOC that I am presently using is not presently creating any issues displaying images. The problem is the heat at the source connector possibly causing problems in the future. I doubt very much the voltage inserter at the display end will have any impact on the heat at the source connector!
 

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The uncertified 2.1 Ruipro Gen 3/C AOC that I am presently using is not presently creating any issues displaying images. The problem is the heat at the source connector possibly causing problems in the future. I doubt very much the voltage inserter at the display end will have any impact on the heat at the source connector!
You are correct it won't, but I was unclear as to whether you were currently having issues or not. If not, just monitor it and see if the other cable runs a bit cooler. If it is transferred heat from the GPU then there's not much you can do. At least you've documented the issue with Ruirpo, which offers a lifetime warranty. Let us know how the other cable works.
 

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You are correct it won't, but I was unclear as to whether you were currently having issues or not. If not, just monitor it and see if the other cable runs a bit cooler. If it is transferred heat from the GPU then there's not much you can do. At least you've documented the issue with Ruirpo, which offers a lifetime warranty. Let us know how the other cable works.
Hi otto pylot, I have a few questions for you. When you say, pull the HDMI cable from the body and not the connector end are you referring to the body as the cable itself right behind the male connector assembly? Looks like i may be replacing my 25 to 30ft inwall rated 10yr old BlueRigger HDMI cable. It worked with my Yamaha RX-V671 1080P AVR hooked to my sony A8H 4k TV but when I installed my new Denon x3700h AVR I didn't get no picture to the TV so I'm thinking the HDMI cable is not compatible with the new AVR for the distance of 25 to 30ft. I hooked up a portable TV to the new avr with a 4ft HDMI cable and it worked fine. What HDMI cable would you recommend for my setup. I have inwall 1.5" flex hose similar to a vac hose that is not smooth on the inside and when I used a fish tape to pull my BlueRigger HDMI through it wasn't easy with the inside roughness of the hose. If I replace the old hdmi with the new one I was going to use the old inwall rated BlueRigger cable to pull the new one through by over lapping the two ends by 4inches and using electric tape to connect the two cables together, making sure the ends are tape good so maybe they won't hang up to bad. I know by doing this will take up more space inside the 1.5" hose. I would like to butt the two cable ends together to make a easier pull but not sure how to go about that because they may pull apart. How fragile is the new ultra high speed cables with pulling against and what ones would you recommend. I appreciate your time and information.
 

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Hi otto pylot, I have a few questions for you. When you say, pull the HDMI cable from the body and not the connector end are you referring to the body as the cable itself right behind the male connector assembly? Looks like i may be replacing my 25 to 30ft inwall rated 10yr old BlueRigger HDMI cable. It worked with my Yamaha RX-V671 1080P AVR hooked to my sony A8H 4k TV but when I installed my new Denon x3700h AVR I didn't get no picture to the TV so I'm thinking the HDMI cable is not compatible with the new AVR for the distance of 25 to 30ft. I hooked up a portable TV to the new avr with a 4ft HDMI cable and it worked fine. What HDMI cable would you recommend for my setup. I have inwall 1.5" flex hose similar to a vac hose that is not smooth on the inside and when I used a fish tape to pull my BlueRigger HDMI through it wasn't easy with the inside roughness of the hose. If I replace the old hdmi with the new one I was going to use the old inwall rated BlueRigger cable to pull the new one through by over lapping the two ends by 4inches and using electric tape to connect the two cables together, making sure the ends are tape good so maybe they won't hang up to bad. I know by doing this will take up more space inside the 1.5" hose. I would like to butt the two cable ends together to make a easier pull but not sure how to go about that because they may pull apart. How fragile is the new ultra high speed cables with pulling against and what ones would you recommend. I appreciate your time and information.
Ok, when I've pulled cable I attached the pull string (in your case it will be the old cable) to the body of the cable behind the connector ends. I think it was about an inch or two behind. The idea is to secure the cable bodies to each other but not to the connector ends. You can then secure the connector end to each other so that they don't bend back when pulling around a corner.

The 10 year old cable should still work for HD material with the new receiver if your tv and avr settings are correct, unless the cable is damaged. Is the current cable passive or active?

Your conduit should work but the fact that you didn't use a conduit that had smooth interior walls does make it more challenging. You will just have to pull really slow so you don't get the cable hung up on the ridges. I think there is some sort of lubricant that you can use to facilitate the pull but I've not looked into that because I didn't need it.

The fragility of active, hybrid fiber cables is a loaded question. On the one hand, the cables are very thin which means their bend radius (flexibility) is far better than a copper-based cable, so it is better to fish and install in tight places. On the other hand, because they are active, there are chipsets in the connector ends that MAY be damaged (wires/connectors coming loose, etc.) if the cable is pulled too hard from the connector end. The same could be said for passive cables but they just seem to be a bit more tolerant with pulls through long conduits.

As far as recommendations go, I've always had good luck with cables from Ruipro and most reports here are very favorable. Cable Matters makes a very good UHS HDMI cable as does Maxonar. Both are relatively new to the UHS HDMI market so their user base is not as established as Ruipro is, so there aren't a lot of actual consumer reports yet, but my guess is that they will perform just as well over time, maybe even better. If you don't need UHS HDMI cables (HDMI 2.1 option sets), then there are a few more options for hybrid fiber cables or active copper-based cables that support the HDMI 2.0 option sets. As I have mentioned many times, there are no guarantees for long cable runs. A lot depends on the connected devices, how the cable is installed, and what you are trying to push.

The most reliable connection will be a single cable, source to sink, with no wall plates, adapters, extenders etc in-between, and no sharp, 90º bends. This is especially true for active cables. That's not to say that those types of connections won't or can't work, but they can introduce issues. The less complicated your cable connection is, the better your chances are for longevity (reliability). What ever cable you get, lay it out on the floor and thoroughly test it prior to installation to make sure that it meets your needs and expectations prior to installation.
 

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Ok, when I've pulled cable I attached the pull string (in your case it will be the old cable) to the body of the cable behind the connector ends. I think it was about an inch or two behind. The idea is to secure the cable bodies to each other but not to the connector ends. You can then secure the connector end to each other so that they don't bend back when pulling around a corner.

The 10 year old cable should still work for HD material with the new receiver if your tv and avr settings are correct, unless the cable is damaged. Is the current cable passive or active?

Your conduit should work but the fact that you didn't use a conduit that had smooth interior walls does make it more challenging. You will just have to pull really slow so you don't get the cable hung up on the ridges. I think there is some sort of lubricant that you can use to facilitate the pull but I've not looked into that because I didn't need it.

The fragility of active, hybrid fiber cables is a loaded question. On the one hand, the cables are very thin which means their bend radius (flexibility) is far better than a copper-based cable, so it is better to fish and install in tight places. On the other hand, because they are active, there are chipsets in the connector ends that MAY be damaged (wires/connectors coming loose, etc.) if the cable is pulled too hard from the connector end. The same could be said for passive cables but they just seem to be a bit more tolerant with pulls through long conduits.

As far as recommendations go, I've always had good luck with cables from Ruipro and most reports here are very favorable. Cable Matters makes a very good UHS HDMI cable as does Maxonar. Both are relatively new to the UHS HDMI market so their user base is not as established as Ruipro is, so there aren't a lot of actual consumer reports yet, but my guess is that they will perform just as well over time, maybe even better. If you don't need UHS HDMI cables (HDMI 2.1 option sets), then there are a few more options for hybrid fiber cables or active copper-based cables that support the HDMI 2.0 option sets. As I have mentioned many times, there are no guarantees for long cable runs. A lot depends on the connected devices, how the cable is installed, and what you are trying to push.

The most reliable connection will be a single cable, source to sink, with no wall plates, adapters, extenders etc in-between, and no sharp, 90º bends. This is especially true for active cables. That's not to say that those types of connections won't or can't work, but they can introduce issues. The less complicated your cable connection is, the better your chances are for longevity (reliability). What ever cable you get, lay it out on the floor and thoroughly test it prior to installation to make sure that it meets your needs and expectations prior to installation.
Thanks for the information. I looked into my BlueRigger cable on Amazon were I bought it and couldn't find information on it from the manufacturer if it was active or passive but the question was asked on the sight with mixed answers mostly they said it was passive, I would lean that direction too. I plan on unhooking the x3700h from the media closet and put it near the sony A8H TV and hook the two up with a short HDMI cable and see if the two will work together that way, just to see if the problem is the BlueRigger cable or not. Like I said earlier the X3700H worked with a old portable TV . I will just have to see if x3700h will work with the newer sony A8H TV with a different HDMI cable.
 

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Your conduit should work but the fact that you didn't use a conduit that had smooth interior walls does make it more challenging.
The best trick I've found for fishing any kind of cable with a pre-terminated end through conduit with ridges is more electrical tape. These cables all come with protectors for the actual plug that is inserted into the source/sink.

First, use a bit of tape to secure that protector to the connector. Then, secure the cables to one another as you describe. The trick is to then build up some additional electrical tape on the lead connector to form a bit of a ramp between the pulling cable and the trailing connector. This ramp will help keep the hard, 90-degree edges of the connector from snagging quite so easily. It's still more difficult than smooth conduit but not nearly as bad as a bare connector.
 

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Thanks for the information. I looked into my BlueRigger cable on Amazon were I bought it and couldn't find information on it from the manufacturer if it was active or passive but the question was asked on the sight with mixed answers mostly they said it was passive, I would lean that direction too. I plan on unhooking the x3700h from the media closet and put it near the sony A8H TV and hook the two up with a short HDMI cable and see if the two will work together that way, just to see if the problem is the BlueRigger cable or not. Like I said earlier the X3700H worked with a old portable TV . I will just have to see if x3700h will work with the newer sony A8H TV with a different HDMI cable.
Active cables are directional in that you can only install them in one direction. The connector ends are usually marked as Source and Sink, or TV. They are thinner because they don't require the wire gauge needed due to the fact that they draw power from the HDMI port for the chipsets in the connector ends, hence the active terminology.

Passive cables will have a thicker wire gauge as they get longer to maintain signal propagation. As such, they will be thicker and less flexible which has its own set of issues. I prefer to use passive cables whenever possible because the active cables, be they copper only or hybrid fiber have electronics in the connectors which just provides another layer of complexity when it comes to compatibility and reliability over time. Any electronic device can fail over time so that's why it's critical to have a good installation plan in place for replacing/upgrading cables when and if the time comes. However, given the cable length that a lot of folks need now, and the gamers who want to use some of the HDMI 2.1 options that are available from a given distance, active hybrid fiber cables are almost a requirement now.
 

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Active cables are directional in that you can only install them in one direction. The connector ends are usually marked as Source and Sink, or TV. They are thinner because they don't require the wire gauge needed due to the fact that they draw power from the HDMI port for the chipsets in the connector ends, hence the active terminology.

Passive cables will have a thicker wire gauge as they get longer to maintain signal propagation. As such, they will be thicker and less flexible which has its own set of issues. I prefer to use passive cables whenever possible because the active cables, be they copper only or hybrid fiber have electronics in the connectors which just provides another layer of complexity when it comes to compatibility and reliability over time. Any electronic device can fail over time so that's why it's critical to have a good installation plan in place for replacing/upgrading cables when and if the time comes. However, given the cable length that a lot of folks need now, and the gamers who want to use some of the HDMI 2.1 options that are available from a given distance, active hybrid fiber cables are almost a requirement now.
In that case my BlueRigger is a passive HDMI cable. I will not be using my setup for gaming, I just want a HDMI cable to get the best picture that my TV is capable of showing 4k maybe 8k later on and being able to handle my AVR capabilities (minus the gaming). Also handshake between the two with earc. Sounds like I may have more issues with the active cable long term, with it being fairly new compared to the passive cable. I will be doing more troubleshooting with my system in a couple of days.
 
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