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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Not sure where to ask this. I have a Blue Ray player and a DirectTv DVR, both have 6 foot Cat 2 Certified, 1.3 HDMI cables that go into the back of my receiver. The HDMI that comes from the receiver to the TV is 3 foot, 1.3 HDMI. It is not certified as Cat 2 because it has to be at least 4 feet long to "get up to speed" as I was told.


Does this make sense? Does it matter? I am using a 720p TV so it is not an issue now I would imagine, but when I go to 1080p will it be an issue?


Help please.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ringfinger /forum/post/18280272


The HDMI that comes from the receiver to the TV is 3 foot, 1.3 HDMI. It is not certified as Cat 2 because it has to be at least 4 feet long to "get up to speed" as I was told.


Does this make sense?

Utter nonsense.
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Does it matter?

No.
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I am using a 720p TV so it is not an issue now I would imagine, but when I go to 1080p will it be an issue?

No.


PS. There is a dedicated forum for HDMI Q&A - The One Connector World .
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I thought Cat 2 allows the 10.2 Gbps flow, and the non Cat 2 does not. Am I wrong? What is the length issue then?


yeah, I have 720p but the picture is awesome and I've no desire to replace as of yet. Just being nosey on the HDMI stuff.


So, do I have to replace any cables if I get a 1080p TV?
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ringfinger /forum/post/18280423


I thought Cat 2 allows the 10.2 Gbps flow, and the non Cat 2 does not.

HDMI 1.3 delivers 10.2Gbps (~1080p).


Category 1 and category 2 are simply test protocols, not performance standards.
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What is the length issue then?
What "length issue"??
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do I have to replace any cables if I get a 1080p TV?

No.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
So short answer, I am fine, don't change any cables even with 1080p because I have 1.3 certified HDMI cables, right?


Length issue is 3 foot cannon transmit the data as quick as 4 foot.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ringfinger /forum/post/18281402


So short answer, I am fine, don't change any cables even with 1080p because I have 1.3 certified HDMI cables, right?

Right.
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Length issue is 3 foot cannon transmit the data as quick as 4 foot.
And where did you pick up that gem??


Electrical data propagates through a coaxial cable at about 66% of at the speed of light (299,792,458 m/s). I don't think that the difference of one-foot in a cable length is going to make much difference in your life one way or the other but to suggest it takes longer to pass through a shorter cable leaves me somewhat nonplussed.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·

Quote:
Originally Posted by cavu /forum/post/18281760


Right.
And where did you pick up that gem??


Electrical data propagates through a coaxial cable at about 66% of at the speed of light (299,792,458 m/s). I don't think that the difference of one-foot in a cable length is going to make much difference in your life one way or the other but to suggest it takes longer to pass through a shorter cable leaves me somewhat nonplussed.

That gem was from Monoprice. They told me, and I quote "The three foot cable does not allow the signal to get up to full speed, you need at least four feet to do so."
 

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And cavu is right, by the way. In solid PE dielectric, the velocity of propagation is 66% of the speed of light--and like light, electricity doesn't "get up to speed"--it propagates at the same speed the whole way. The silly thing here is, though, that the "speed" in question isn't even actually the speed of current flow, but the bitrate, and with that in mind, the statement makes even less sense. Bitrate doesn't depend on what goes on in the cable at all--the faster the speed of propagation, the faster a bit will travel from one end of the cable to the other, but the data rate remains the same. So, you could be using an HDPE foam dielectric cable with an 83% velocity of propagation instead of the 66% solid PE, and it wouldn't have any impact upon the "speed" of the cable in the relevant sense.


Kurt
HDMI Cable at Blue Jeans Cable
 

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Here's an idea for your 3 foot HDMI cable: Install it in such a way that the signal travels downhill! That way it can get up to the same speed as a 4 foot cable!!
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·

Quote:
Originally Posted by Chas821 /forum/post/18286587


Here's an idea for your 3 foot HDMI cable: Install it in such a way that the signal travels downhill! That way it can get up to the same speed as a 4 foot cable!!

Not a bad idea!!
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chas821 /forum/post/18286587


Here's an idea for your 3 foot HDMI cable: Install it in such a way that the signal travels downhill! That way it can get up to the same speed as a 4 foot cable!!

Now THAT is a great idea! In fact, I'm moving my computer to the basement now so that it'll be downhill from the Internet...


Kurt
Blue Jeans Cable
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by KurtBJC /forum/post/18288780


I'm moving my computer to the basement now so that it'll be downhill from the Internet...

Yeah, but uploads are a *****.
 
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