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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So....while on a quest to learn more about surge protectors and whole house protectors, after recently having some of my HT equipment damaged in a nasty storm, I cam across several posts that described pretty much exactly what happened to me.

I lost the HDMI inputs/output of my Denon receiver and both HDMI inputs on my Panny Plasma.
(but not the HDMI on the PS3 or DTV receiver).


It appears that HDMI I/O circuitry is a little sensitive.

I'm actually surprised that I hadn't heard about this before now or read about more cases of people losing their HDMI connections.


So the question then is, what can I do about it? There isn't exactly a large selection of HDMI surge protectors out there. I'm not even sure if a properly functional HDMI protector is even possible (within reasonable means, of course).


Other than that question, I'd love to hear what others recommend for a 'higher' end surge protection setup (whole house protection unit - willing to spend a couple hundred [Panamax 5100] - and a really good HT cabinet protection for about 1000W total power - willing to spend another couple hundred here too [Eaton, Leviton, Intermatic])
 

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I just went through the same thing about a month ago. I had a Square-D whole house surgebreaker installed in my panel but it couldn't stop everything as I lost a ton of stuff that was wired to the A phase of my house. I'm thinking you pretty much can't stop very close/direct lightning hits, only prevent as much damage as possible. I am replacing the surgebreaker, installing hospital grade surge protected outlets at the HT area (instead of the power strip type stuff), and will probably replace/drive another ground rod to try and help that surgebreaker bleed those transients off better. I also installed my own RG-6 surge protector where the cable TV enters the house and tied that right to my ground rod.
 

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All you can do is have all your AV electrical cords and cable wire go through a good surge protector (don't forget the cable wire), plus have an electrician install high grade surge protectors at the fuse box. That's what I did after lightning struck the ground right outside my house, came into the house, and fried a lot of equipment (mostly computer equipment, miraculously sparing my AV equipment).
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
DrivenByDemons:


I'll have to look into the hospital grade stuff. Hadn't even thought of that as an option.

Regarding the ground rod: I ran across some post that got me thinking along those lines too. What's interesting in my case is that the house ground rod is literally about 5ft from my HT center (opposite side of the house exterior wall). I'm thinking of replacing it with something mo 'better' ? Read something about putting it in conductive concrete and whatnot...I'll have to look more into this.

But....the other idea I had was to install another ground rod that was closer to the service panel. But then I read where having multiple grounds can be a real danger if they're not properly connected together....which really isn't feasible in my case.


BillP:

Definitely want to add extra protection to my coax cables. I have 2 cables coming down the side of the house and into the HT center. Currently, they first hit a passthrough at the drip-loop, and this is also about 12" from where the ground rod is, but this still makes me nervous having wires like this outside running right into the HT equipment.

Are the gas discharge tube devices the right way to go for coax protection or are there better devices to use?

I also lost my firewall and a couple of ports on my switch. Thankfully none of the other computer equipment in my lair was damaged.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by ck42 /forum/post/20894952


DrivenByDemons:


I'll have to look into the hospital grade stuff. Hadn't even thought of that as an option.

Regarding the ground rod: I ran across some post that got me thinking along those lines too. What's interesting in my case is that the house ground rod is literally about 5ft from my HT center (opposite side of the house exterior wall). I'm thinking of replacing it with something mo 'better' ? Read something about putting it in conductive concrete and whatnot...I'll have to look more into this.

But....the other idea I had was to install another ground rod that was closer to the service panel. But then I read where having multiple grounds can be a real danger if they're not properly connected together....which really isn't feasible in my case.

You can have as many ground rods as you want BUT - they should be spaced twice as far apart as they are deep and they should all be bonded to the same spot at your service entrance. If you use 8' rods they should be 16' apart. Closer together won't hurt but it's a waste of rods and not as effective. Best practice is to cadweld them all together and terminate at one spot. The concrete thing is awesome if your building a new house (use rebar in the footers as ground) but seems like a bad choice for an existing house. What you DON'T want to do is put a separate ground rod somewhere else and use it independent of your main ground. You're asking for numerous problems doing that. I've seen cable TV guys drive a separate rod and bond to that which is SOOO wrong.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by ck42 /forum/post/20894952


I'll have to look into the hospital grade stuff. Hadn't even thought of that as an option.

Don't waste your money for hospital grade anything. An Industrial grade receptacle and a Hospital grade are the exact same device. The ONLY difference is the Hospital grade has a green dot on it therefore they charge more.


Also the joule rating for a surge suppressing receptacle is always a fraction of the rating of even a cheap power bar. So while they save space you live with less protection.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·

Quote:
Originally Posted by DrivenByDemons /forum/post/20895292


You can have as many ground rods as you want BUT - they should be spaced twice as far apart as they are deep and they should all be bonded to the same spot at your service entrance. If you use 8' rods they should be 16' apart. Closer together won't hurt but it's a waste of rods and not as effective. Best practice is to cadweld them all together and terminate at one spot. The concrete thing is awesome if your building a new house (use rebar in the footers as ground) but seems like a bad choice for an existing house. What you DON'T want to do is put a separate ground rod somewhere else and use it independent of your main ground. You're asking for numerous problems doing that. I've seen cable TV guys drive a separate rod and bond to that which is SOOO wrong.


So, the existing ground rod is more than 16ft from the service panel, which is where I was thinking of putting a second rod.

So if I put the second rod right near the panel, would the correct thing to do be to simply make sure that it is attached to the same ground point (in the panel) that the other ground rod is attached?
 
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