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CalMAN Workflow Solution for HDR10

Per my contacts at Samsung, they will be releasing a workflow solution for calibrating HDR10 displays shortly.
 

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On a more positive note, for the JVC RS500/RS600 projectors, there has been some discussion (over on the JVC thread) on proper setup for HDR that appears to result is satisfactory results.
I've figured out the JVC HDR setup. I spent some good time on one in one of my dealer's showrooms figuring out how each control affected one another (contrast, brightness, and the three Gamma D sub-functions). I chose specific targets to achieve and the end result was breathtaking. I've seen a lot of displays throughout my 16+ years calibrating, but I've never seen image quality as good as what I managed off of the JVC with HDR from the Samsung player. It blew everyone away!! And this is only the beginning!
 

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Discussion Starter #484
ITU announces new standard for High Dynamic Range TV: ITU-R HDR-TV Recommendation BT.2100-0 (July 2016)

Geneva, 5 July 2016 – ITU has announced a new standard for High Dynamic Range Television that represents a major advance in television broadcasting. High Dynamic Range Television (HDR-TV) brings an incredible feeling of realism, building further on the superior colour fidelity of ITU’s Ultra-High Definition Television (UHDTV) Recommendation BT.2020. ITU’s Radiocommunication Sector (ITU-R) has developed the standard – or Recommendation – in collaboration with experts from the television industry, broadcasting organizations and regulatory institutions in its Study Group 6.

“High Dynamic Range Television will bring a whole new viewing experience to audiences around the world,” said ITU Secretary-General Houlin Zhao, welcoming the announcement. “TV programming will be enhanced with brighter pictures that add sparkle to entertainment and realism to news coverage.”

“High Dynamic Range Television represents an important step towards the virtual-reality quality of experience to be delivered by future broadcasting and multimedia systems,” said François Rancy, Director of the ITU Radiocommunication Bureau. He congratulated Yukihiro Nishida, Chairman of ITU-R Study Group 6, for this major achievement.

The ITU-R UHDTV Recommendation BT.2020, approved in October 2015, represented the continuous evolution of television since it was invented in the 1930s, transforming the dim black and white screen into an ultra-high definition colour picture on large flat panel displays.

This latest ITU-R HDR-TV Recommendation BT.2100 brings a further boost to television images, giving viewers an enhanced visual experience with added realism. The HDR-TV Recommendation allows TV programmes to take full advantage of the new and much brighter display technologies. HDR-TV can make outdoor sunlit scenes appear brighter and more natural, adding highlights and sparkle. It enhances dimly lit interior and night scenes, revealing more detail in darker areas, giving TV producers the ability to reveal texture and subtle colours that are usually lost with existing Standard Dynamic Range TV.

The HDR-TV Recommendation details two options for producing High Dynamic Range TV images. The Perceptual Quantization (PQ) specification achieves a very wide range of brightness levels using a transfer function that is finely tuned to match the human visual system and the Hybrid Log-Gamma (HLG) specification which offers a degree of compatibility with legacy displays by more closely matching the previously established television transfer curves. The Recommendation also outlines a simple conversion process between the two HDR-TV options.

The ITU-R Recommendation BT.2100 also allows TV producers to choose from three levels of detail or resolution: HDTV (1920 by 1080), and UHDTV ‘4K’ (3840 by 2160) and ‘8K’ (7680 by 4320) – all of which use the progressive imaging system with extended colour gamut and range of frame-rates in ITU’s UHDTV Recommendation BT.2020.

“This Recommendation is the culmination of three years of intensive work by dedicated image experts from around the world. HDR images are stunning and this is another major step forward in television quality,” said Andy Quested, Chairman of ITU-R Working Party 6C (WP 6C), which developed the new standard. “Programme makers today need a much wider range of options in order to meet the expectations of the different platforms they must supply, and this need for flexibility is catered for within the framework of a stable ITU-R Recommendation.”

Download Link: http://www.itu.int/dms_pubrec/itu-r/rec/bt/R-REC-BT.2100-0-201607-I!!PDF-E.pdf
 

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I've figured out the JVC HDR setup. I spent some good time on one in one of my dealer's showrooms figuring out how each control affected one another (contrast, brightness, and the three Gamma D sub-functions). I chose specific targets to achieve and the end result was breathtaking. I've seen a lot of displays throughout my 16+ years calibrating, but I've never seen image quality as good as what I managed off of the JVC with HDR from the Samsung player. It blew everyone away!! And this is only the beginning!
Agree I've managed to reasonably calibrate my JVC and it looked pretty spectacular. Now I am getting a new Sony 320ES projector, any thoughts/tips on how to calibrate HDR for that one? I have the Sammy player too. I know its bit of an unknown territory at the moment. I know it won't be an HDR champion due to its brightness levels but I'd like to get the best out of it.
 

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Now I am getting a new Sony 320ES projector, any thoughts/tips on how to calibrate HDR for that one?
Did the update for this one happen yet? I know there was discussion, but I haven't followed through with finding out. I'll make a call today.
 

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Can this be implemented with current 2016 OLEDs or are they trying to get us to upgrade .....again? :rolleyes:
It does 1000nits as a minimum, but then again BT.709 gave gamut specs, but not all TVs fully hit those and they are still sold as HD TVs.

There is very little new info in this spec. It does make both HLG and PQ open standards with the formulas freely available. Beyond that there is no information on metadata or metadata mapping.
 

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Can this be implemented with current 2016 OLEDs or are they trying to get us to upgrade .....again? :rolleyes:
If it uses static meta data and defines how PQ should be mapped to HLG (and if content creaters take that standardized mapping into account) *and* if your 2016 OLED can be adjusted to handle that mapping (and if it can do so in combo with source devices) this updated standard could be useful.

But it won't solve hardware or software limitations, and I'd find it surprising if manufacturers implemented or tried to implement this stuff in existing hardware in a plug and play fashion. For that, look to 2018 models.....

But it is a step in the right direction, imo.
 

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Did the update for this one happen yet? I know there was discussion, but I haven't followed through with finding out. I'll make a call today.
Yes update is out and picking the PJ up today. Would love to see some tips. So far I am not aware of anyone testing this unit. Cheers.
 

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It does 1000nits as a minimum, but then again BT.709 gave gamut specs, but not all TVs fully hit those and they are still sold as HD TVs.

There is very little new info in this spec. It does make both HLG and PQ open standards with the formulas freely available. Beyond that there is no information on metadata or metadata mapping.
So HLG is playing the same role as BT.1886 in Rec709 encoding? With the aim to standardize to an end-to-end "gamma" of 1.2 with adjustments for display black and white? Is Dolby Vision their version of an HLG function?
 

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So HLG is playing the same role as BT.1886 in Rec709 encoding? With the aim to standardize to an end-to-end "gamma" of 1.2 with adjustments for display black and white? Is Dolby Vision their version of an HLG function?
No.

PQ based HDR uses the PQ curve for encoding and decoding. (Dolby and "hdr10")

HLG has a fixed OETF, and a very funky EOTF that scales gamma based on max luminance (1.2 for 1000 nits, higher for brighter sets, lower for darker ones) includes a black offset at the bottom and scales RGB in unison for luminance values based end-to-end gamma.


The problem with HLG is that a 100% luminance red is only something like 25% total light output, so when you apply the end-to-end gamma (0.25)^1.2 = 0.19, so on a 1000 nit display, we only use 190nits for max red instead of 250nits.


So no HLG isn't anything like BT.1886. The goal of HLG was to come up with an HDR signal that would look "compatible" with an SDR TV that is not HLG aware. The compromise is that HLG is not that good at HDR either. That said using a relative signal solves a lot of problems for live broadcast. So we may well end up with both standards being used where content that goes through proper post production uses PQ and live events use HLG.
 

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So no HLG isn't anything like BT.1886. The goal of HLG was to come up with an HDR signal that would look "compatible" with an SDR TV that is not HLG aware. The compromise is that HLG is not that good at HDR either. That said using a relative signal solves a lot of problems for live broadcast. So we may well end up with both standards being used where content that goes through proper post production uses PQ and live events use HLG.
Thanks for that explanation. Have you seen any examples of an HLG source on an SDR/power law display?
 

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Thanks for that explanation. Have you seen any examples of an HLG source on an SDR/power law display?
At SMPTE last October sony had a setup in their booth and the BBC demo of HLG also had an SDR version.

Honestly I'm not entirely sure what I was looking at because the HLG version clearly had bt.2020 color encoding for wide gamut nad the SDR versions were only bt.709. About the only thing I could deduce was that I likely wasn't actually looking at the same signal.

Also it seems pretty silly to try and remain compatible with bt.1886 EOTF if at the same time you're going to require bt.2020 color signaling.
 

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Discussion Starter #495
The following stuff has been recorded during NAB 2016 at the last session of Post Production World.

This Panel was on "High Dynamic Range" or HDR, the hottest topic of the NAB show this year. (2016)

The audio has been broken up into topics to make it easier to find what you're interested in...

NAB16, Post Production World Panel on HDR (PPWPonHDR) Intro.

PPWPonHDR 02, What is HDR.

PPWPonHDR 03, Dolby on standards and their path for HDR.

PPWPonHDR 04, Cameras and the production side of HDR.

PPWPonHDR 05, Whats makes a display HDR, how many stops?

PPWPonHDR 07, Why does HDR use Rec 2020 Deliverables?

PPWPonHDR 08, Telling stories with HDR. Do you need to?

PPWPonHDR 09, HDR, pushing it too hard because its new.. HDR is harder to shoot for..

PPWPonHDR 10, Shooting HDR productions changes the way we shoot. (Windowing in the grade considerations)

PPWPonHDR 11, As an editor is HDR something I have to worry about?

PPWPonHDR 12, What should I be looking for in a HDR Monitor.

PPWPonHDR 13, Dolby on Leading the way and their role with the Pulsar Monitor.

PPWPonHDR 14, Calibration, landscape changing. EOTF, key to targeting HDR.

PPWPonHDR 15, 2 Masters: Do I need two Monitors in my Grading Suite? Retime requirements.

PPWPonHDR 16, Peak luminance, blacks, QC and deliverables. Sony X300 discussion.

PPWPonHDR 17, Why 1000nits has become the HDR target for now and using quasi HDR capable displays.

PPWPonHDR 18, HDR in TV and Cinema, totally different, how do we deal with this? More trim passes?

PPWPonHDR 19, HDR does not mean the average brightness increases, you don't have to go BRIGHT in HDR.

PPWPonHDR 20, The other elephant in the room, Automatic Brightness Limiting on HDR displays.

PPWPonHDR 21, What is the roll of MetaData in the HDR landscape. Ie Dolby vision.

PPWPonHDR 22, How is the MetaData handed of, where does it come from, whose responsibility is it?

PPWPonHDR 23, Is the viewing environment part of the standards in how vendors display HDR?

Post Production World Panel on HDR (PPWPonHDR) FULL LENGTH
 

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Yes update is out and picking the PJ up today. Would love to see some tips. So far I am not aware of anyone testing this unit. Cheers.
Been playing with my new 320ES since I picked it up yesterday and HDR and BT2020 show potential especially WCG. Now only If there was a good tutorial on calibration. I am using the Samsung player and its hopeless paired wit the Sony PJ but running HDR demos on the HTPC produces some spectacular images.
 

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Been playing with my new 320ES since I picked it up yesterday and HDR and BT2020 show potential especially WCG. Now only If there was a good tutorial on calibration. I am using the Samsung player and its hopeless paired wit the Sony PJ but running HDR demos on the HTPC produces some spectacular images.


As much as HDR10 calibration on flat panels is the Wild West, HDR10 calibration on projectors is like North of the Wall in GoT.
 

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HDR Calibration & Discussion

Edit: it looks like this only applies to the apps, not the HDMI inputs.

Fw update to version 3.15.25 on the 2016 LG OLEDs enables the 2pt whit balance controls for HDR10 (previously only the 21pt was enabled)

It was just released today.
 

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As much as HDR10 calibration on flat panels is the Wild West, HDR10 calibration on projectors is like North of the Wall in GoT.
Yep. However I've now worked out some suitable settings and am getting a very nice picture. The only issues remains is to calibrate BT 2020 but don't know how.
 
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