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Your post makes sense, except I have asked several times in the calibration and HDR/WCG threads whether it is even possible to "calibrate" current HDR10 only sets to either dci.p3 or rec2020 and have, several times, been told "no" its is not currently possible to calibrate, because, essentially, each set simply "does what it does" when HDR mode kicks in. If you have contrary information, I would love to see a link, as I and trying to get my head wrapped around this issue before I purchase my next display. I freely confess that I don't have a handle on this issue as much as I'd like to.
Yes it is possible to calibrate an HDR display. However, it is totally different than what we were accustomed to with REC.709 calibrated because the TV is setup by default to come close to its full capabilities. Well atleast that is the case with the Vizio P-series and the "Calibrated Dark" profile. Since the TV has some tolerances and inherit variances you can calibrate those out. The benefits of calibrating a properly configured HDR display are minimal at best. Almost definitely not worth the cost.
 

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Interesting video of how the picture look on DV dynamic mode vs HDR 10 static mode.



 

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Interesting video of how the picture look on DV dynamic mode vs HDR 10 static mode.
Not so interesting when you learn they are changing settings on the LCD screen trying to make it look like the OLED and ruining the picture to begin with. It's less a comparison between HDR methods and more a comparison between TV technologies. When someone compares both on the same tv I will be more interested.
 
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Read this article posted in the 4K thread, it covers and explains 4K and HDR in great detail:

https://pro.sony.com/bbsccms/assets/files/cat/mondisp/articles/HDR_X300_explained.pdf
For all the examples in that PDF, to me the SDR picture looks better... I'm using a 27" 1080p monitor and made sure I changed my settings from Eco to Standard but the HDR examples still look too dark... hmmm. Now, in some of the picture examples, there are some benefits with HDR but still looks dark to me....maybe it's just the way it's display on my regular LCD monitor, I dunno.
 

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For all the examples in that PDF, to me the SDR picture looks better... I'm using a 27" 1080p monitor and made sure I changed my settings from Eco to Standard but the HDR examples still look too dark... hmmm. Now, in some of the picture examples, there are some benefits with HDR but still looks dark to me....maybe it's just the way it's display on my regular LCD monitor, I dunno.
Is your monitor even hdr? lol
 

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Is your monitor even hdr? lol
I think the real question is "Is the PDF even HDR?"


Think about it, if I take a 8bit camera and take a Picture of a 8Bit and 10bit picture I would think the 8bit picture would look better as the camera can capture the full spectrum of the 8bit image. Other wise the camera has to fake the 10bit picture the best it can.
 

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For all the examples in that PDF, to me the SDR picture looks better... I'm using a 27" 1080p monitor and made sure I changed my settings from Eco to Standard but the HDR examples still look too dark... hmmm. Now, in some of the picture examples, there are some benefits with HDR but still looks dark to me....maybe it's just the way it's display on my regular LCD monitor, I dunno.
You know, that does bring up a good point, I'm sure you need the actual color gamut to really see the true difference, you'd have to see side by side on the same model display to see the actual difference.
I think the real question is "Is the PDF even HDR?"


Think about it, if I take a 8bit camera and take a Picture of a 8Bit and 10bit picture I would think the 8bit picture would look better as the camera can capture the full spectrum of the 8bit image. Other wise the camera has to fake the 10bit picture the best it can.
The point of HDR is to have a greater range not just blinding peak white and pitch dark blacks. The PDF shows exactly that in the pictures, BUT you have to read the actual article to find out why HDR is considered superior. :)
 

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The point of HDR is to have a greater range not just blinding peak white and pitch dark blacks. The PDF shows exactly that in the pictures, BUT you have to read the actual article to find out why HDR is considered superior. :)
Right, it talks about detail and color, etc but to me the photos are too dark to notice except for mainly the cityscape shot where the sunset really pops... Hopefully stores will start having demos loops from manufacturers to really show the actual difference so we can see in person, but still an interesting article.
 

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For all the examples in that PDF, to me the SDR picture looks better... I'm using a 27" 1080p monitor and made sure I changed my settings from Eco to Standard but the HDR examples still look too dark... hmmm. Now, in some of the picture examples, there are some benefits with HDR but still looks dark to me....maybe it's just the way it's display on my regular LCD monitor, I dunno.
You say dark but in the SDR image you lose detail. In exchange for the extra detail you have more shadow information which brings the picture down to a lower brightness level. Then you have the highlights that on an HDR TV will be much brighter than the surrounding image. To give an example for highlights imagine looking at a lake and the sun reflecting off of it. You can see the reflection but still see the detail of the water and the ripples and waves. In a typical SDR picture you lose some of that detail. The bright white reflection washes out some of the water's detail so you can't see the ripples and waves. HDR corrects this by making the reflection bright but keeping all the information in the picture so you don't lose detail. For the shadows you simply have more variations between black and white. Often an SDR picture will have some levels of grey clipped out and shown darker than they are in reality. HDR allows you to see the lost detail.
 

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Oh boy, so much speculation etc.

Viper32
 

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You say dark but in the SDR image you lose detail. In exchange for the extra detail you have more shadow information which brings the picture down to a lower brightness level. Then you have the highlights that on an HDR TV will be much brighter than the surrounding image. To give an example for highlights imagine looking at a lake and the sun reflecting off of it. You can see the reflection but still see the detail of the water and the ripples and waves. In a typical SDR picture you lose some of that detail. The bright white reflection washes out some of the water's detail so you can't see the ripples and waves. HDR corrects this by making the reflection bright but keeping all the information in the picture so you don't lose detail. For the shadows you simply have more variations between black and white. Often an SDR picture will have some levels of grey clipped out and shown darker than they are in reality. HDR allows you to see the lost detail.
Thanks, I totally get the concept, I just suppose I can't see how it's better on a regular monitor as the HDR picture just shows up too dark. It doesn't matter if there is more detail or not if I can't even see it, I'm sure on an actual HDR TV it would be apparent. BUT, the good example is seeing the horizon line in the city-scape shot, the horizon looks amazing with HDR.
 

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Bottom line, HDR is a gimmick intended to persuade us to "upgrade" our TVS for the umpteenth time. No thanks. Not this time.
Between 4k and HDR an upgrade over 1080p is far from a gimmick. You're entitled to your opinion but do you go on sewing forums and post about how sewing is boring and clothes are cheap to buy so why do you bother? This is an enthusiast site, if you're not interested in adding anything to the discussion feel free to not post.
 

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One thing going against the P series regarding HDR is it simply isn't capable of bright enough highlights to meet the HDR10 spec certification. Just check the nits on the rtings review. The 2% is nearly the same brightness as 100%. Not saying it won't look good, but it's something to consider.
 

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One thing going against the P series regarding HDR is it simply isn't capable of bright enough highlights to meet the HDR10 spec certification. Just check the nits on the rtings review. The 2% is nearly the same brightness as 100%. Not saying it won't look good, but it's something to consider.

And one thing about higher nits displays ,check the rtings HDR pattern and Local dimming test for those displays and let me know if you see 0 blooming and halo.

I was a Samsung JS9500 owner. I also owned the Sony 930C and JS8500.

We need a TV that can properly handle higher nits without blooming or halos.
 

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Bottom line, HDR is a gimmick intended to persuade us to "upgrade" our TVS for the umpteenth time. No thanks. Not this time.


This is so far from the truth I don't think you have any clue about the technology at all.
 
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Bottom line, HDR is a gimmick intended to persuade us to "upgrade" our TVS for the umpteenth time. No thanks. Not this time.
LOL u have no clue far from a gimmick is HDR
 
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