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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Sorry for starting another LT150 thread.

The current pricing on the LT150, and the totally reasonable street price for the LT150z are really tempting me to finally take the plunge.

However, I'm worried about buying a projector that can't display "true" HDTV resolutions.

This isn't even remotely an issue for me yet, because I don't have any HDTV signals available to me, but a projector like this would be an investment I'd like to keep around for quite some time.

I'd be feeding it with an HTPC, and adding an HDTV decoder when that type of broadcast became available.. I'm just worrying that lack of true 1280x720 panel resolution is going to prevent me from enjoying HDTV to the fullest extent.

Is the fact that the LT150 is missing this 17% extra resolution going to come back to bite me?


Thanks,

--Wilson.
 

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You are correct about the resoltion issue, but the general consensus has been that is does not matter, and the image is still every bit as sharp as it can be. Also, take into consideration the price differences between an LT150 and the new 16:9 DLP units.
 

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Thanks. Now I just need to hunt up a place to demo the LT150, and see if I notice the rainbows. Unfortunately, I'm pretty sure I will. I can tell the difference between 100Hz and 120Hz refresh rate instantly, and that sort of thing seems to equate well with the "ability" to be distracted by rainbows.
 

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Look at a Crayola ceiling fan and see if you see separate colors of the blade on the highest speed or just one big blurr. This should tell you if you're prone to rainbows. Even if you are it may only bothers you on panning scenes which are a minority of the movie.


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Huey ;-]
 

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Before the copy-protection hysteria takes hold again, let me jump in here.


1) There is no need whatsoever to copy-protect weekly network series programming supported by commercials - to do so is to simply deny yourself advertising revenue by shrinking your audience.


2) The group behind the copy protection schemes is seeking to prohibit unencrypted digital transfer of HD premium programming such as movies, concerts, and sporting events.

However, if they turn on the copy protection feature, they lose revenues for the reason stated above. If the owner of the premium content insists upon only copy-protected broadcasts of that content, he has reduced the value of that material to the broadcaster by 3/4's or more, and must therefore be willing to settle for 1/4 the fee he could have gotten for the open broadcast.


3) If you are happy watching movies that are "Edited for content and to run in the time allowed", where the aspect ratio has been altered to fit your screen, and the movie has been diced into 12-minute segments to run between commercials, and the sound mixed down to Dolby Surround, then you should care. I'm not happy with such and thus I don't care.


4) Please don't hesitate to buy equipment which does not support the copy protection scheme, and boycott the purchase of any gear which does. The copy-protection scheme will fail very quickly.


5) Lastly, become a promoter of item #4 to every friend and relative and stranger you meet.


Now to answer your question: The LT150 has an analog video input called an HD15 connector that can be configured for two forms of analog interface called "RGBHV" and "component video". Such interfaces cannot support the proposed digital copy protection scheme. Of the few front projectors which do have digital inputs (called DVI) none presently contain decryption circuits.


There is a single JVC RPTV product they call the D'ahlia which claims forward compatibility with the proposed copy protection scheme. Please don't ever buy one, and tell all your friends.


There are several standalone HDTVs which have built in HDTV tuners and satellite receivers, but no HD video outputs for VCRs or PVRs. Please don't ever buy those either.


The consumer has all the power.


Gary
 

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For HDTV viewing for the long term, I'd be more concerned with the proposed encryption of the signal. Unless I missed an update, last I heard there was still some question as to whether projectors without built-in decryption equipment (almost all current models) would be able to display all HDTV content at its full resolution.


I don't remember all the acronyms and definitions for this copy protection standard, but I remember it was causing a stir a while back on this forum. A search should turn up some of the threads.
 
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