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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
 http://www.tvinsite.com/broadcasting...ndustryid=1025


Course it helps to know that most TV series are filmed on 35mm now. Hard

to exactly say why. My guesses would be:


A. Because its allways been done that way (long before professional

videotape).


B. 35mm holds up better in editting than NTSC video would.


So the real question is if the industry is ready to say HDTV is good enough

to capture and store in.
 

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People have shot on film for many reasons:

  • Shooting in the highest quality ensures the most possible uses for your content. Many series were shot in color even though they were not broadcast that way initially.
  • 35mm film is archival, something that cannot be said for most other media. At a SMPTE meeting in LA several years ago, George Joblove (head of production at Sony Pictures Imageworks) asked the audiance during a presentation on a Datacine product how many could still read 8" floppies. Almost no one could. He then asked how many could still display 35mm B&W film from the 1930's and everyone could.
  • Easier to transcode to PAL, etc.[/list=A]
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Quote:
Originally posted by majortom
People have shot on film for many reasons:

[*] 35mm film is archival, something that cannot be said for most other media. At a SMPTE meeting in LA several years ago, George Joblove (head of production at Sony Pictures Imageworks) asked the audiance during a presentation on a Datacine product how many could still read 8" floppies. Almost no one could. He then asked how many could still display 35mm B&W film from the 1930's and everyone could.
Now, how many of those 35mm B&W films from the 1930s still exist in

good condition without having been duplicated to new film at least once

or twice ?
 

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Quote:
Originally posted by S. A. Moore

35mm holds up better in editting than NTSC video would.
Even shows that are shot on 35mm film are edited on video, although they are done in a component digital format, not NTSC.
 

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Quote:
Originally posted by S. A. Moore
[

A. Because its allways been done that way (long before professional

videotape).


B. 35mm holds up better in editting than NTSC video would.


So the real question is if the industry is ready to say HDTV is good enough

to capture and store in.
(sigh).

I've posted this so many times......


The reasons for the survival of 35mm film (and 16mm film, for that matter) in television mostly have to do with production, not post production and not archival issues. As a production tool, film is far more versatile and adapts much better to less than ideal shooting conditions. It has a much wider contrast range, can be shot at any frame rate (allowing for slow and fast motion photography), can be adapted via different stocks to different shooting conditions, has a much wider range of lenses and accessories available, and can be used in dangerous situations (by using an "eyemo," a stripped down and very inexpensive camera) without undue financial risk. It also offers better resolution and framing options (allowing reframing in post), much more control over depth of field (allowing for more selective focus, and therefore more control), and a better color pallette. There are advantages in terms of archival stability vs. any videotape format, but the primary reasons are the ones I've already listed.


Now, having said all that, HD has an economic advantage that is getting more significant (it wasn't significant a year ago). That's why you'll find more shows shot with HD cameras next season (primarily multicamera sitcoms, but there will be some single camera as well), and more the season after that. as the economics take over. Ultimately, HD production for television series will be predominant, but it will not be because of creative choice, and not because it's "better" or more versatile. It will be because it's cheaper.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
And after the blush of "cheaper" fades, then folks will be putting the work

into giving HD all the advantages you list for film. HD cameras will eventually

be cheap enough to qualify as "eyemo" cameras (new one on me).


No, I fully well expect there will be people saying that 35mm is

fundamentally different from HD years and years from now no matter

how much work is put into the system. There are still people claiming

that vacuum tubes have a "warmer" sound. Not many people avocating

the return of vacuum tubes, however.
 
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