AVS Forum banner
Status
Not open for further replies.
1 - 5 of 5 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
16 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have read the some of the posts concerning HDTV/Firewire/etc. I was considering buying an HDTV this year (Loewe Aconda 38" possibly). However, although I am not technically savvy enough to completely understand the issues raised, I am concerned that a new standard such as Firewire STB's and HDTV's would possibly render an HDTV with only VGA and/or component inputs incompatible and not upgradeable. Any feedback would be appreciated.
 

·
Registered
LG 55" C9 OLED, Yamaha RX-A660, Monoprice 5.1.2 Speakers, WMC HTPC, TiVo Bolt, X1
Joined
·
45,617 Posts
There is no easy answer to this question, at least right now. Here is one man's opinion.


The movie studios, represented by the MPAA, are very, very concerned about the possibility of perfect digital copies of their property (movies) creating a black market that would prevent them from earning the expected revenues from their labors. This fear was exacerbated by the recent meteoric rise of MP3 & Napster. You know, free music for everyone. Yikes! said the MPAA.


The consumer electronics companies who make the equipment were put under significant pressure by these factions. The most obvious solution was to develop a security system that could control the use of the program material. This way the studios could decide when & how movies could be copied, or not.


Two different methods have developed, for the sake of brevity, we'll call them DVI and IEEE1394.


DVI is a more limited method, with no communications capability and it was chosen by a few companies that seemed to indicate they would only use DVI and eliminate the analog outputs that are currently used by every HDTV capable display. In other words, your HDTV & HDTV source could only be connected by DVI.


IEEE1394 is more flexible with two way communications, in addition to a wide pipe for HDTV. The companies that have sided with IEEE1394 have already developed a system (known as iLink or HAVi) for letting anything with a IEEE1394 port talk to each other. The benefit of this is still unknown (at least to me), but it has potential way beyond DVI. It also has a recently approved (by Sony Pictures & Warner Brothers) copy protection system called 5C. This would let users have limited ability to copy for personal use, if the owner allows it. The companies aligned with IEEE1394 seem to be less intent on only having their standard on equipment, which would mean we would still see analog video outputs on HDTV sources, at least for awhile. This last possibility is not a sure thing. Until HDTV's, VCR's and new STB's start showing up with IEEE1394, we won't know if existing equipment will be obsolete or useful until some point in the future when all video and audio connections are digital.


Because there are a number of significant issues yet to be decided, like how the cable companies will deal with HDTV, we won't know how all this will play out anytime soon. Some people think this will take a few years, or more. Others think because of the recent movement by the studios and CEA ( http://www.ce.org/newsroom/newsloader.asp?newsfile=7460 ) that IEEE1394 full implementation will come relatively soon.


Confused? I'm sorry but you'll just have to join the rest of us.


This has been discussed at length at AVS, do searches for DVI, IEEE1394, 5C in HDTV Hardware and HDTV Recording for a lot more detail.




------------------

"better living thru modern expensive electronics"

tm
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
98 Posts
The short answer is that IEEE-1394 is going to become the standard way to connect digital home theater devices. The first 1394 sets and devices will be introduced this summer and fall. By the end of next year there will be quite a few 1394 devices from many manufacturers.


I WOULD be concerned about obsolesence. If 1394 HD Set-top boxes have component outputs to connect to existing TVs, then you can upgrade by getting a 1394 STB. But if the 1394 devices don't have component outputs and the 1394 ports in TVs are only built-in (as is true of the first products coming out this summer), then you would be out of luck.


One correction. iLink is Sony's name for IEEE-1394 (Firewire), not a variant of HAVi. HAVi will be important because it defines how these 1394 devices talk to each other. On a 1394 equiped TV, you can see an on-screen graphic of a 1394 device control panel such as an HD recorder or set-top-box and you can control it on screen. That is HAVi. Home theater hookups will be more like computer networks, with HAVi acting like the network control software.
 

·
Registered
LG 55" C9 OLED, Yamaha RX-A660, Monoprice 5.1.2 Speakers, WMC HTPC, TiVo Bolt, X1
Joined
·
45,617 Posts
Yeringto,


Only one correction? You've got to be kidding, I musta been unconscious!


By the way, the new Sony HDTV's announced available this summer will have both iLink & analog video capability.
http://www.twice.com/html/pagebeta.cfm?InputKey=3284


------------------

"better living thru modern expensive electronics"

tm
 
1 - 5 of 5 Posts
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top