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Hi,

Help me settle a bet. What does the 2006 fcc mandate state?

The way I see it, all signals must be digital by 2006 but not necessarily high definition.

My opponent believes it must be a high definition signal by 2006.

Who is correct?
 

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The only requirement is digital, not HD. Among other things, the deadline is contingent upon a certain percentage of households being able to 'tune-in' the broadcasts.


Mike
 

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dtv not hd ..

Though the FCC (though Chairman Powell) has recently encouraged the networks to do some hd in primetime, it does not mean anyone has to broadcast it that way tho, both of which I find alittle ironic -- as they want HD and think it is important but won't back it up.. aahhh polictics
 

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Agree with Mike Jones, only mandate is digital TV. Been that way from day One.
 

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Quote:
Originally posted by mjones
The only requirement is digital, not HD. Among other things, the deadline is contingent upon a certain percentage of households being able to 'tune-in' the broadcasts.


Mike
The percentage I beleive is 85% of the people who would be able to receive digital signals. AND the turn off of analog signals will not happen in the year 2006, probably closer to 2012. 2006 is when most or all OTA stations are to be digital.


As far as the amount of stations that currently broadcast a digital signal is around 50%. The amount of people currently able to receive digital signals is about or less than 1% (I think).
 

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Quote:
Originally posted by Thebarnman
2006 is when most or all OTA stations are to be digital
No, the deadline for all OTA stations to be broadcasting digitally is actually next month. The deadline for commercial stations was May 1, 2002 and for non-commercial stations (i.e. PBS, etc.) is May 1, 2003. Stations are allowed two six-month extensions for cause, so the realistic dates are next month for commercial stations and May 1, 2004 for PBS.

Quote:
Originally posted by TimBob5259
please define receiving a digital signal?

Does it mean a TV set must be able to receive a digital signal?
The Balanced Budget Act of 1997 states that a station must surrender its analog license on December 31, 2006 unless 15% or more households in its market do not have at least one DTV receiver and do not subscribe to a multichannel provider (cable or satellite) that carries the digital signals.


NTSC shutoff will happen sooner than a lot of people think. Definitely not in 2006, but certainly before 2010.


Here's a long discussion we had last year on this very topic:

Timeline for US stations to go digital .
 

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Quote:
Originally posted by TimBob5259
please define receiving a digital signal?

Does it mean a TV set must be able to receive a digital signal?
I don't really remember, It's been quite awhile since I read all te docs and amendments. So, if I'm remembering correctly, 'able to receive a signal' = 'the ability for a home to decode the digital signal'


I intentionally used 'home' and not 'tv' because because a digital STB qualifies. Note: this requirement is only to *receive* the signal, not neccessarily the ability to *display* the signal. i.e. If Sony produces a 13" TV with an integrated ATSC receiver, they are not required to actually display the full specification of the ATSC stream a.k.a. implied downres to NTSC 480i. However, this new tv would qualify as a unit capable of receivint OTA DTV transmissions.
 

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Quote:
Originally posted by TimBob5259
please define receiving a digital signal?

Does it mean a TV set must be able to receive a digital signal?
The FCC is defining this very issue now with their Second DTV Review. Hopefully the definitive answer will be out this summer. Most think it will mean people who can actually view the digital channel either OTA or cable, not just have it available in a cable.
 

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No further definition by the FCC is needed. Congress defined it very clearly in the Balanced Budget Act of 1997. The following are the exact words from the relevant part of the Act:

Quote:
Section 309(j) of the Communications Act of 1934 (47 U.S.C.

309(j)) is amended by adding at the end the following new paragraph:

`(14) AUCTION OF RECAPTURED BROADCAST TELEVISION SPECTRUM-

`(A) LIMITATIONS ON TERMS OF TERRESTRIAL TELEVISION

BROADCAST LICENSES- A television broadcast license that

authorizes analog television service may not be renewed to

authorize such service for a period that extends beyond

December 31, 2006.

`(B) EXTENSION- The Commission shall extend the date

described in subparagraph (A) for any station that requests

such extension in any television market if the Commission

finds that--

`(i) one or more of the stations in such market that

are licensed to or affiliated with one of the four

largest national television networks are not

broadcasting a digital television service signal, and

the Commission finds that each such station has

exercised due diligence and satisfies the conditions

for an extension of the Commission's applicable

construction deadlines for digital television service

in that market;

`(ii) digital-to-analog converter technology is not

generally available in such market; or

`(iii) in any market in which an extension is not

available under clause (i) or (ii), 15 percent or more

of the television households in such market--
`(I) do not subscribe to a multichannel video programming

distributor (as defined in section 602) that carries one of the

digital television service programming channels of each of the

television stations broadcasting such a channel in such market; and

`(II) do not have either--

`(a) at least one television receiver capable of receiving the

digital television service signals of the television stations

licensed in such market; or

`(b) at least one television receiver of analog television

service signals equipped with digital-to-analog converter

technology capable of receiving the digital television service

signals of the television stations licensed in such market.
I believe the highlighted part defines it pretty clearly. You need to either own a DTV receiver (not necessarily HDTV) or suscribe to a cable or satellite system that carries the digital signals (even in downconverted form) to be counted towards the 85%.
 

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Quote:
Originally posted by vruiz
No further definition by the FCC is needed. Congress defined it very clearly in the Balanced Budget Act of 1997. The following are the exact words from the relevant part of the Act:


{snip}


I believe the highlighted part defines it pretty clearly. You need to either own a DTV receiver (not necessarily HDTV) or suscribe to a cable or satellite system that carries the digital signals (even in downconverted form) to be counted towards the 85%.


On January 15, 2003 the FCC issued NOTICE OF PROPOSED RULE MAKING MB Docket No. 03-15. The following is an EXACT wording:

MB Docket No. 03-15 secF par 72 "Definition of Television Market"


72.Under Section 309(j)(14)(B), the Commission must consider whether any one of the three conditions for an extension exist in the requesting station’s “television market.†For purposes of applying Section 309(j)(14)(B), we invite comment on how we should define “television market.†One option would be to define “television market†as the designated market area or DMA, as defined by Nielsen Media Research, in which the television station requesting the extension is located. A DMA is a geographic market designation that defines each television market based on measured viewing patterns.1 Nonoverlapping DMAs cover the entire continental United States, Hawaii, and parts of Alaska. Counties are assigned to a market based on which home-market stations receive a preponderance of total viewing hours in the county.2 Every television station in the United States is assigned to a DMA by Nielsen.3 Another option would be to define “television market†as the requesting station’s Grade B contour. Each television station has its own Grade B contour. While the Grade B contours of stations often overlap, two stations are unlikely to have identical Grade B contours. Thus, under a Grade B market definition, the applicable market to be analyzed would be unique for each station requesting an extension.


{losts of "stuff" left out that only explains the different methodology}


78.How we define the “market†is important in applying each of the conditions for an extension under Section 309(j)(14)(B). We request comment on the impact of a DMA, modified DMA, or Grade B market definition on the Grade B market definition on the availability of extensions under each of these conditions. For example, under Section 309(j)(14)(B)(iii)(I), an extension is available in a market where 15 percent or more of the television households in the market do not subscribe to an MVPD that carries one of the digital channels of each television station broadcasting in digital in the market. What would the effect be on the 15% test for an extension of defining the market as the station’s DMA when the DMA is geographically very large, thus increasing the likelihood that stations within the DMA would substantially duplicate each other or be unable to deliver a good quality signal to all the cable systems in the DMA?1 If DMA is used for purposes of defining “television market,†what effect, if any, would market modifications pursuant to Section 614(h)(1)(C) have on the appropriate definition.2 We invite comment on this point and other definitions of “market†for purposes of Section 309(j)(14)(B) and justifications therefore.



As you can see, the Communications Act leaves LARGE gaps. Until that is settled, the "85% Percent" rule is in limbo.
 

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It seems to me that by the definition of 309(j) posted above we may make the 2006 analog cutoff date. Since satellite is by definition digital and if cable universally offers digital service and if some portion of the OTA users are digital, then the analog channels will be shut off!!!


Rick R
 
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