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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I was looking at some TV's this weekend and was wondering the difference between HD TV big screen Monitors and HD TV big screen projection units. When watching one of the monitors compared to the projection TV's the monitors looked much better to me.
 

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I'm not sure I understand what you're referring to, are you talking about Tube HDTVs vs Rear-Projection big screen HDTVs?


In such a comparison, you will usually find a better picture on the tube tv because the tube design allows for greater brightness and better black levels. Also, since a tube TV is by nature a smaller screen, the pixel density is higher (eg fit 1 million dots in a smaller space and the dots per inch are greater) and won't reveal as much as the magnified image on a bigger screen.


The only real advantage a projection setup of any kind brings to the table is the ability to produce a larger picture. There is no way to make a 64" tube TV, but it's quite easy to find a 64" RPTV.


Front projector setups are the next step and follow the same logical lines. They are normally less bright than an RPTV (much less than tube), but can produce an 80-120" picture. This is why people dim the lights in theaters (home and commercial). Also, because the image is blown up to such a large size, it becomes much more important to have the best signal possible, including more expensive processors/electronics to produce that image.


jake
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks for the info..


Here is what really got me confused..Bestbuy was advertising the following:


Toshiba 65" 16:9 Widescreen Rear-Projection HDTV Monitorwith 2-Tuner Picture-In-Picture — 65H81


and


Philips 55" 16:9 High-Definition Projection TV with 2-Tuner (Analog) Picture-In-Picture — 55PP9701


Are they just putting the monitor term for the Toshiba in there by mistake or does it mean something else?


Thanks.
 

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In this case, the difference is whether an HDTV receiver is included in the set. By convention, a set that contains an HDTV receiver (able to receive, interpret, and display an HDTV signal by itself) is called an HDTV. Most of the sets you see on the market require you to buy a separate receiver (called a set top box or STB) to interpret and display an HD signal. They call these sets "HDTV Capable" or "HDTV Ready" or a "monitor" most of the time depending on the manufacturer. Price of this STB will add anywhere from $300 to $1200 depending on the quality and features.


------------------

Lou Daboll


[This message has been edited by ldaboll (edited 09-07-2001).]
 
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