AVS Forum banner
Status
Not open for further replies.
1 - 9 of 9 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
68 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I recently set up my NEC LT150, and having watched some ordinary cable TV with it, I am of course dissatisfied.

I have in turn decided to switch to a satellite service, but I'm quite confused as to what exactly I have to do. Here are the important issues for me:


1) I want to be able to view high definition broadcasts.


2) I want a clearer picture overall, especially while viewing sporting events. Sports are my primary focus, and I'm particulary concerned with how football games will look (since I'd be watching the Jets and Giants on local stations--CBS and Fox).


3) I want to be able to record (so I guess I need one of those live-pause and instant record players).


As you can probably see I'm a little confused how exactly this all works so if anyone can help me I'd appreciate it. Which service should I go with? What exactly do I need to purchase to set this all up?


How will this look through the LT150? I would imagine the HD stuff is incredible, but how about the ordinary stations through the dish as compared to regular cable?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,123 Posts
Your best bet is getting satellite with a receiver that doubles OTA (SDTV and NTSC) sources. Watch sports via OTA wherever possible (when HDTV is not available of the same event). DTC-100 (DirecTV) or DISH 6000.


If your analog cable is good quality, running it through a HTPC may result in better quality than non-HD DBS channels, which are very compressed these days.


To summarize quality for non-HD sources:


Best: OTA (SDTV or NTSC) via doubler


Good: good cable via HTPC, DBS via HD doubler (if the channel is not very compressed that day)


Worst: bad cable, highly compressed DBS
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
68 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Michael:


I have a line doubler already (DVDO IScan Pro), if that means anything for me. What exactly is OTA? How much programming has this?

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
32,172 Posts
OTA = Over the Air, i.e. NOT cable and NOT satellite.


OTA pictures are not digital, which is nice, and -- unlike many cable systems -- can provide a beautiful signal. Why is digital not so nice? Because regular networks -- not to mention regular cable stations -- are very compressed on DirecTV and are often not so pretty.


Mark
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
24 Posts
James_T,


You are truly in the dark. You will need to purchase a HDTV DBS and OTA combo receiver (available from RCA, Toshiba, Mitsubishi, Sony, Panasonic, etc.), the appropriate dish and a (preferrably) a Channel Master UHF antenna mounted on your roof, to watch the HBO HD feed (and Showtime if you get a DISH system rather than DirectTV), and the digital channels from CBS, NBC, ABC, FOX, PIX, WOR and PBS available to you on LI from ESB and WTC in Manhattan.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
68 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Rob:


Thanks for the info. So from what you are saying I gather that buying the Dish Network Model 6000 will not be good enough and I'll instead be buying one of those models capable of both DBS and OTA signals (which Dish Network apparently does not offer). Is that correct? It just sounds a little funny to me and I am surprised this is not made clear at all on their website.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
32,172 Posts
The Dish Network receiver will allow you to get both kinds of HD (satellite and terrestrial). The point is you will need an antenna to get the terrestrial stuff -- your local broadcast stations.


Yes, OTA is gotten with an antenna. If you are close enough to get it, it's a great picture.


Mark
 
1 - 9 of 9 Posts
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top