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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
With a high end video editing workstation, I like to capture video and edit DV video in the interlaced domain 60 fields per second and do my best to retain the original interlaced quality. I'm even picky about the dv codecs used because I'm so picky with quality compared to most people after shooting with an expensive DV camcorder. Even the best smart computer based deinterlacers cause quality loss, so I want to avoid that quality loss of 480i to 480p (or 540p) "interlaced to progressive" upconversion done by most HDTVs which involves deinterlacing. It destroys the video quality. My final product is always interlaced for playback through s-video or component video. So I need the display to not alter that output. As the experienced technical users and true videographers probably know, it's best to display your input in its native format rather than line doubling, deinterlacing, upconverting, or resampling. So I want accurate playback of my 480i/60fields per second DV video.


Therefore, this is what I'm looking for:


An HDTV Ready RPTV that:


Has 16:9 display 43" to 47"

Native 480i/p (doesn't upconvert 480p to 540p for display)

Lets you manually disable the line doubler/deinterlacer for all inputs

Has DVI inputs for future copy protect issues with HDTV content


Does anyone know of any HDTV sets that meets these qualifications?

If not, what's the closest match?
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
I'll even settle for a direct view if I can get one that lets you disable the line doubler. Anyone?
 

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looks like your stuck with an analog TV for your 480i format. I don't think 480i is in the ATSC listed as one of the scanrates. We are going away from NTSC.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I found a Panansonic 47wx49 that lets you turn off the line doubler by using the "game mode." The scanlines then become noticable, but overall, it's a sharper image from interlaced video/ntsc sources with less artifacting/noise.


But I didn't get it, and I didn't get a TV that lets you disable the line doulber. I got the new Panasonic 47wx42 instead which has some other features improving upon the old wx49, even though it doesn't have the feature to disable the line doubler.


(Note - I'm referring to true 60i video here, not video which was shot 24p and converted to 60i using 3:2 pulldown which is an entirely different issue.)


Why did I go with an HDTV which doesn't let you disable the line doubler? Because, I found out that an HDTV doesn't deinterlace the video the same way a computer software deinterlacer does. Hundreds of posts I've read were misleading in that respect. A computer based deinterlacer will deinterlace interlaced video frames/fields by eliminating a field or combining the 2 fields into a single frame, and drawing these resulting progressive frames 30 times per second. So you can't even tell if you have a field order problem on the source video.


But HDTVs (at least my Panasonic) deinterlaces by separating the fields, then doubling the lines in each field independently, so you have essentially 60 progressive frames per second, and they are displayed on the HDTV with each field drawn as an independent line doubled progressive frame at a rate of 60 frames (line doubled fields) per second. Therefore, if there is a field order problem, you still see it because the fields are NOT combined as they are by a computer deinterlacer. With my HDTV, the fields are played back in the correct order as line doubled frames; they are simply displayed differently than on a regular TV because each field is drawn from top to bottom without skipping every other line. Anyway, I had to get my own HDTV to finally test and determine this because most feedback I've read in the past was simply statements containing buzzwords such as "it upconverts your 480i to 480p." That really wasn't very helpful. But now I know how it really works at a detailed level, so I hope that might help someone. This 60 frames (line doubled fields) also retains the original smoothness of the source video by maintaining the original 60 independent images taken off the CCDs per second each recorded 1/60th of a second before the next. On a computer, by contast, the video displays only 30 independent frames per second from images which were not originally recorded as such. This makes the HDTV method superior.
 
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