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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Are 16:9 inch CRT based computer monitors better in video quality than

consumer HDTVs?


I currently have a Pioneer Elite PRO-710HD rear-projection HDTV,

a Hipix DTV-200, and a Matrox G450 video card that has native suppport

for various 16:9 aspect ratios of up to 1920 x 1200. I have not been

able to get the Matrox to work with my HDTV at its native 1080i

setting (33.75kHz H and 60 Hz V). The Hipix card's output looks great

for TV viewing, but I'd love to get similar quality out of my Matrox video

card for computer viewing.


Would I be better off using a new 16:9 computer CRT?
 

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Your problem may be that very few PC video cards handle interlaced resolutions. Why should they? Interlaced displays make horrible text images. Perhaps you can try a 960 x 540 progressive format, many use that for PC displays on 1080i TVs.


Most 16:9 PC displays use 720p instead. Graphics cards have no trouble producing it, since it's progressive.


Look around at the sets the users here in the HTPC forum are using... there is a definate preference for 'burn proof' progressive displays for anyone using their HDTV as a PC monitor. DLP and LCOS and LCD.
 

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Is there any listing of which cards can output 1080i?
 

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I haven't run across any consumer video cards that directly support 1080i, except particular ATI Radeon cards thru the YPbPr component dongle/adapter (and some HD tuner cards of course).


However, based on numerous threads here, it can be done with custom settings using Powerstrip, or by editing the registries of some video cards. Most users seem to prefer the progressive modes like 540p though, and ATI cards for this.
 

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OK, I wasn't really asking which cards do it by default, although my question did sound that way. I was really wondering if there are only certain cards that will output 1080i through powerstrip for DVDs, etc...? I was told my Ti4200 most likely won't.
 

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I don't own a Geforce, but my understanding is they will line-double, rather than interlace. So they may not be able to do genuine 1080i.


Hopefully someone with more direct experience will reply.
 

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Thanks... know of any cards that can do true interlace through powerstrip?
 

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I think any of the recent ATI Radeons should be able to. Whether or not it'll look good, or the video inlay will work right may be another matter


Try running a search on: powerstrip AND ATI AND 1080i or some variation thereof.


It may be possible to set the timings without powerstrip as well via this other method.
 

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or just get a projector, if you're looking to get a new display. a good one costs $2-$3k, and you get a _huge_ image. you get to bypass the whole interlaced issue entirely, since these projectors are designed to handle high progressive resolutions.
 

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Another solution, which I'm actually considering, is to get a relatively big CRT computer monitor to watch HDTV...


There are a few in the 30-34" range which can support resolutions up to 720p for $1000+ (check out www.digitalconnection.com )... or if you are willing to compromise size for top notch quality, the Sony GDM-FW900, a 24" widescreen can do 1080p without breaking a sweat.... It costs $1500-2000, but is oh so tempting.
 

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Eiffel-- to a point. I used a 27 inch monitor for a while (viewsonic 29 ga) and it's neat to watch from across a room, but not a patch on anything bigger. maybe the 30-34 inch would do better, but from ten feet away, it's not that special.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Your coments really help. I'm disappointed that I haven't been able to find a very large format computer monitor with resolutions in excess of HDTV formats. I'm more concerned with computer image quality than price and any of the formats that seem to work on my rear-projection CRT HDTV have been disappointing.
 

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Quote:
Originally posted by kentschwartz
Your coments really help. I'm disappointed that I haven't been able to find a very large format computer monitor with resolutions in excess of HDTV formats. I'm more concerned with computer image quality than price and any of the formats that seem to work on my rear-projection CRT HDTV have been disappointing.
Is there a particular reason why standard computer monitors are not considered for HDTV display devices?


At a suitable viewing distance, a 21" monitor can appear like a large screen HDTV, has the resolution and is relatively cheap.


Maybe it is the fact that a monitor is only a sole viewer display device and multiple monitors are required for more than one person viewing a movie, that dissuades people from implementing this arrangement more widely. However, I think it has more to do with the mindset of what we are used to: a large screen across the room that many can watch simultaneously (a la cinema), so anything different seems strange and unacceptable.


I'm just getting used to watching HDTV clips on a 19" monitor, although the resolution is limited to 1280x960p desktop, yet it offers quite breathtaking detail and certainly a large enough field of view (compared to my 80cm TV). Considering I can't afford an HDTV (which can't fully resolve true HDTV resolution anyway), I'm impressed with this solution for sole viewing.


Just wondering when the market will begin to move in the direction of personal hi-res displays: it offers many potential advantages including cost, minimising use of resources and personal viewing adjustment.


Ian
 

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It's hard to feel enveloped by a smaller computer display. I also like the greater gain and analog feel of a large tube. Hate the cumbersome weight though (200 lbs for my 34XBR800). There are alotta new hybrid flat displays out now though that look pretty sweet. Kinda makes me wish I'd waited a bit.
 

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Quote:
Originally posted by IanD
Is there a particular reason why standard computer monitors are not considered for HDTV display devices?


At a suitable viewing distance, a 21" monitor can appear like a large screen HDTV, has the resolution and is relatively cheap.


Maybe it is the fact that a monitor is only a sole viewer display device and multiple monitors are required for more than one person viewing a movie, that dissuades people from implementing this arrangement more widely. However, I think it has more to do with the mindset of what we are used to: a large screen across the room that many can watch simultaneously (a la cinema), so anything different seems strange and unacceptable.


I'm just getting used to watching HDTV clips on a 19" monitor, although the resolution is limited to 1280x960p desktop, yet it offers quite breathtaking detail and certainly a large enough field of view (compared to my 80cm TV). Considering I can't afford an HDTV (which can't fully resolve true HDTV resolution anyway), I'm impressed with this solution for sole viewing.


Just wondering when the market will begin to move in the direction of personal hi-res displays: it offers many potential advantages including cost, minimising use of resources and personal viewing adjustment.


Ian
Sony has the same opinion : "Personal Entertainment Display" SDM-V72W/B, 17", WXGA 1280 x 768, 760p, 1080i, 16:9, 800 US$
http://www.sonystyle.com/is-bin/INTE...uAPzX&Dept=cpu
 

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Again, if you do choose to go the monitor route, you have to be close to the screen for it to be at all useful. Yes, further away, you can tell the difference between HD and not-HD, but you'd have to be more sensitive than most to the change.


For me, I like to have the space between myself and what I'm viewing, mainly so I can watch it with friends when they come over. I had a large crew over to watch the lord of the rings on the little guy, and while it looked clear and crisp, it was not really adequate for a group viewing.


So I guess it's personal preference. If you don't mind being up close and personal with the monitor, a 21"monitor will offer you all the capabilites you need for this, short of a tuner, for a couple hundred bucks. I went the projector route because I had the space and because it makes an enormous picture, but still costs less than most decent HD sets. The PJ has a resolution of 1024x768 max, so while I'm not getting the full resolution of 1080i, everyone who has seen it has been wowed.


but then again, kentschwartz, if you really want the monitor option, I have the 29GA gathering dust right now. it can do 1280x1024 and has two 15 pin inputs (one is an old-mac style connector, there are adaptors). If you're in the LA area, pm me if you wanna take a look at it and see if the large monitor option is the right call.

 

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You do not need to limit yourself to 21" monitors. There are plenty of 30", 34", and 38" monitors out there that supports 720p natively. Monivision, Princeton Graphics, CTX, and Sampo are the brand names that come to mind.


I own a 38" Monivision DM7752ST and can view DVD material and WM9-encoded material at 1280x720 @ 60 hz which is the maximum 16:9 resolution supported by the monitor (1024x768 is max 4:3 resolution).


I believe Monivision has a widescreen 34" flat-tube monitor that supports 1280x720 natively.


Check out the Direct View TV forum for a recent thread on a special deal for a widescreen 30" Monivision.
 
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