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For Immediate Release

HDTVs in More than Half of All U.S. Homes


Seven in Ten Receive HD Programming Package


(Alexandria, VA – August 04, 2009) A recent Cable & Telecommunications Association for Marketing (CTAM) tracking Pulse report shows strong growth over the past year in HDTV ownership. In 2009, 53 percent of total U.S. households report owning a high definition television, an 18 percentage point increase in ownership over 2008, when 35 percent of households reported owning an HDTV (23 percent in 2007). Among HDTV set owners, 69 percent now subscribe to high definition service, compared to 56 percent a year ago.


Ownership of large screen televisions –32 inches and larger – has also seen solid growth. In 2009, 59 percent of households owned one, up from 52 percent in 2008 (44 percent in 2007).




CTAM’s June/July Pulse report, Tracking Entertainment and Technology: Consumer Value in Media, explores the adoption of entertainment and technology products and services, and the likelihood for future adoption.


In 2009, digital cable market penetration was 34 percent, satellite was 28 percent, and telephone company penetration was 6 percent. Overall, cable has 53 percent of the market.


“Cable continues to be the preferred provider for television services. Cable launched the digital tier well after satellite started selling an all-digital service, yet its customer numbers surpass those of the combined DBS companies,” said CTAM President and CEO Char Beales.


The CTAM tracking study also took a look at recent movers and which technologies they are likely to purchase and services they’re likely to subscribe to over the next year. Movers are more likely than non-movers to buy an HDTV set (26 percent vs. 15 percent), a laptop (24 percent vs. 16 percent), and a video game system (23 percent vs. 7 percent); as well as subscribe to HD programming service (15 percent vs. 8 percent) and DVR service (17 percent vs. 7 percent).


This research is based on a telephone survey conducted by CENTRIS as part of the CENTRIS(sm) omnibus survey conducted from June 5 through 14, 2009. The sample includes 1,144 randomly selected adult consumers age 18+. This study has a +/- 3.5 percentage point margin of error.

http://www.ctam.com/html/news/releases/090804.htm
 

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Nice.

I keep telling my friends to get a HDTV and upgrade to DISH HD service.

They insist they want to do other house hold projects like putting a Gazebo up and remodel their master bathroom.

HDTV comes first
 

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So, according to this survey, just over a third of US households actually can view HD programming.


After close to a decade, that is painfully slow acceptance.
 

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A friend has a 11 year old 27" CRT that is about to go out. He will be replacing that with a 32" LCD. He currently has U-Verse but left to his own conventions would probably just hook it up the way it is with the coxial cable in (low def) and then wonder why the pictures are stretched. Just in case that happens I picked up an inexpensive HDMI cable and will go over and change his setup which the VCR and DVD now on separate inputs. They are currently all chained through the VCR. How many people do you imagine have HD sets and even with HD available don't know how to set up to get it (open QAM etc)?
 

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I just moved into a house that had D* before. There was a 60" LCD in the family room here, I saw it when I was doing a walk through. Sure enough, when I moved in, I found out that there was a non-Slimline dish on the side of the roof. I don't know how people justify buying 60" TVs but no HD programming.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by fredfa /forum/post/16961159


So, according to this survey, just over a third of US households actually can view HD programming.


After close to a decade, that is painfully slow acceptance.

And how long did it take Color NTSC to catch on fire?


I think HDTV is doing quite well in comparison.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Brian Conrad /forum/post/16963091


A friend has a 11 year old 27" CRT that is about to go out. He will be replacing that with a 32" LCD. He currently has U-Verse but left to his own conventions would probably just hook it up the way it is with the coxial cable in (low def) and then wonder why the pictures are stretched. Just in case that happens I picked up an inexpensive HDMI cable and will go over and change his setup which the VCR and DVD now on separate inputs.

If he doesn't have HD service, U-Verse's SD is actually quite good, so it should look fairly decent on a smaller, 32" HD LCD if you do hook it up through the better input.


If he doesn't want to spend the money for HD, just tell him to get an antenna.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by HDTVChallenged /forum/post/16964404


And how long did it take Color NTSC to catch on fire?


I think HDTV is doing quite well in comparison.

Color TV exploded. We went from mostly black and white in 1960 to all three networks in full-time color in 1965. And there were only five million color sets in 1965, but that didn't stop the broadcasters from going to color.


I think HDTV is doing quite poorly in comparison.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cosmos2 /forum/post/16964462


Color TV exploded. We went from mostly black and white in 1960 to all three networks in full-time color in 1965. And there were only five million color sets in 1965, but that didn't stop the broadcasters from going to color.

Wow ... a whole 5 million color sets you say ... that's roughly one color TV for every 38 people (or one for every 9.5 households ... or 10.5% of total households in 1965.) Ok. "Big Explosion." ... Sure.



BTW, *My* household didn't have any significant "color TV" until the early 70's.


Here we are a whole 3 months from the analog shutoff, and it's going "painfully slow?"
 

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I meant that color broadcasting exploded. At first there were few color shows and few color commercials because there were not enough color sets. But the networks and advertisers didn't wait for everybody to have color TVs, they made the switch quickly.


The HD switch has not been as fast as that. We still have SD commercials on HD programs, and SD programs where they should be HD.
 

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Implementing new technology is always a slow process and takes time for the general population. Even once prices decline to the point where purchasing a new set is reasonable, many people will hold on to their old technology because it gets the job done. From the look of things, it seems like this technology is being accepted pretty easily.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rammitinski /forum/post/16964412


If he doesn't have HD service, U-Verse's SD is actually quite good, so it should look fairly decent on a smaller, 32" HD LCD if you do hook it up through the better input.


If he doesn't want to spend the money for HD, just tell him to get an antenna.

Wouldn't he still get the locals in HD? From what I can tell they only give out one kind of STB and DVR that does both SD/HD. Wouldn't he also get HBO in HD because it came with several months of HBO free? He's East Indian and really cares about the Indian networks anyway but they often show movies letterboxed which he could now zoom up to widescreen. I suspect it'll be a while before Asian channels have HD service. As for an antenna I've tried that there and there was no reception.
 

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I should also mention that a year and a half ago I helped my sister get a 32" LCD for their dining room area. They have Comcast and found the guide hard to read on their 13". She was willing to go larger than 32" but that size was the best size for the placement area. I set it up direct to the cable skipping the box so they could see some HD and before leaving set it back to their SD box setup. The next day she called Comcast and had them install an HD box. They have 42" Mits SD CRT upstairs that is probably gathering dust.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cosmos2 /forum/post/16964821


I meant that color broadcasting exploded. At first there were few color shows and few color commercials because there were not enough color sets. But the networks and advertisers didn't wait for everybody to have color TVs, they made the switch quickly.


The HD switch has not been as fast as that. We still have SD commercials on HD programs, and SD programs where they should be HD.

There were only 3 networks back then.
 

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If black-and-white sets couldn't receive color broadcasts at all, and each station had to broadcast on two channels, one for black-and-white and one for color, how fast would the changeover have been?
 

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Correct me if I'm wrong, but the only requirement for broadcasting in color was new cameras, not completely new broadcast infrastructure.


But regardless, Wikipedia says the first network broadcast in color occurred in 1954, and NBC was the first network to transition it's entire lineup into color in 1965. The other two networks didn't follow until the next year. That's a 13 year transition just for primetime.


When was the first network broadcast in HDTV? 1998? 1999?
 

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For years and years it was only NBC that had color, and then what was broadcast was live, with Bonanza about the only filmed show in color. Walt Disney moved his show to NBC, and apologized to ABC for doing so, because he wanted color.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Brian Conrad /forum/post/16966783


I should also mention that a year and a half ago I helped my sister get a 32" LCD for their dining room area. They have Comcast and found the guide hard to read on their 13". She was willing to go larger than 32" but that size was the best size for the placement area. I set it up direct to the cable skipping the box so they could see some HD and before leaving set it back to their SD box setup. The next day she called Comcast and had them install an HD box. They have 42" Mits SD CRT upstairs that is probably gathering dust.

I am very distressed by this post. Does your sister's family not communicate to each other during their meal times?
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by URFloorMatt /forum/post/16970178


Correct me if I'm wrong, but the only requirement for broadcasting in color was new cameras, not completely new broadcast infrastructure.


But regardless, Wikipedia says the first network broadcast in color occurred in 1954, and NBC was the first network to transition it's entire lineup into color in 1965. The other two networks didn't follow until the next year. That's a 13 year transition just for primetime.


When was the first network broadcast in HDTV? 1998? 1999?

1998 yes or even 1997
 
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