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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Are there any? I've only ever seen 1080i...The reason I ask is because the new Terminator Extreme edition is supposed to support 1080p how is that possible unless there is a TV to support it.


Thanks
 

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Well that's a load of crap...not that I can spend 9G's on a TV but I just bought the GW2 XBR60 and now they are coming out with high rez movies that arent really supported by my TV already...not that I have a problem with my GW2...but man that ticks me off...I figured it would be at least a year before I did't have the latest and greatest
 

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The "HD" stuff on the new T2 (and a few other disks coming out) require you to play back that section of the disk using an HTPC as the source.


The main audience they are aiming for are the front projection crowd who usually run at those kinds of resolutions anyway.


This does not mean you can't take advantage of the new resolutions on this disk --- simply use a computer to feed your TV the highest resolution it will take, scale back the disk resolution a bit - it should still look better than the regular DVD... maybe.


Until this new Microsoft Media Player HD stuff is on the street, who knows if it will look better than regular DVD... there is MUCH more to it than just what the resolution is.


- Rick
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Well with the new HD DVD players coming out within the next year or so, will my TV support the higher resolutions of those or will I end up having to purchase a new TV?
 

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Quote:
Originally posted by acid_bath2
Well with the new HD DVD players coming out within the next year or so, will my TV support the higher resolutions of those or will I end up having to purchase a new TV?
Back to Google...


Appears that the initial batch of HD-DVD players (Samsung, Pioneer, etc.) will be outputting 720p/1080i. No mention at all of 1080p. No need to sell your new HDTV just yet...


I would find it hard to believe that (initially) HD-DVD will be anything other than 720p/1080i as that is the de facto HDTV standard today. Not many HD-DVD players or disks will be sold if it requires a $7,500+ investment in another TV. Most folks still can't grasp spending $1000-2000 for today's HDTV's.


I would agree with Krynos that the "cutting edge" 1080p will be targeted toward FP & HTPC users, the so-called "early adopters" of this type of technology. This group tends to be the proving ground for new technology while the associated costs to the general public work their way down to a level that is palpable to the average viewer.
 

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I'm holding out for 2160i


Although... who wants to watch 1080p upconverted? Nevermind... ;)
 

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Remember also --- that this is *not* a new "standard". Microsoft is pushing it's WMA technology at the moment, how successful this will be is yet to be seen.


The 1080p movies that they are sponsoring are really only designed to be played on computers, of course those of us who have a computer as a source player with display devices capable of 1080p are looking forward to seeing what this new format can do...


However the medium is still DVD, with the same capacity. In order to fit on a DVD a 1080p movie where a 480p movies was designed to fit means that you need more compression to get the 1080 on there, of course different compression techniques are being used by microsoft - a variation on MPEG4 as opposed to the MPEG2 used currently. But still they will need a lot of compression to fit a 1080p movie into 9GB... this may degrade the image to the point where it does not have much of an advantage over normal DVD's. Though of course these disks have not been seen publically yet... they could be amazing, they could be okay, they could be poor. Only time will tell.


However I am upgrading my HTPC to be able to playback these files, you need alot of computing power to decode and playback the 1080p files (there are test file available currently).


I do not think this will be the next big thing, while MS has the resources to push this hard if they decide to, I still think the next generation of DVD devices with much higher capacity will yeild the HD prerecorder content people in the high end are looking for. I believe it will be a while before DVD is replaced though - DVD is still reletively "new", and higher resolution product will take up a niche market like Laser Disk once did - general consumers will not be running out in droves to replace thier DVD hardware and movies until HDTV is the norm and not the exception.


Sony have the blu-ray medium ready for roll out now, and other consortiums are right behind them with their products. It's going to be an interesting few years video-wise coming up... I'm not going to jump on the bandwaggon for a while. I remember getting burnt by picking the best technology in the tape wars, then watching the Beta format die for consumer use.


Personally - I think that 1080i will be the new standard eventually, but not yet and not for a while - so your HDTV investment will be good for a while yet :)


- Rick
 

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Are these 1080p movies 1080p @24 (approx) fps or 1080p @ 60 (approx) fps?


Since most movies are 24 fps, it is only necessary to store 1080p x 24 fps on the disk. From those disks, it is just as easy for a HD DVD player (when they appear on the market) to output 1080i (@ the usual 60 fields per second) as 1080p @ 60 fps (Hz) from the same disk.


And are we talking about TV's that take 1080p (@ 60 Hz) input or that only do (de-interlace to and display) 1080p @ 60 Hz)? The debate will re-open about the advantages of de-interlacing 1080i in the TV versus doing it in the player. But for de-interlacing in the player, we will need cables (digital or anlog) of a quality much more than we typically see today. For (analot) component video 1080p needs 75 MHz, although we can get away with 50 Mhz that is still much more than the 25 Mhz we have been getting away with today.


Video hints:
http://members.aol.com/ajaynejr/video.htm
 
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