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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello,


I was wondering if anyone in the post-production industry can answer this:


These cable tv movies of the week/miniseries that are built up and advertised and billed as epics are shot on 35mm film, telecined to High Def and mastered to HD with a 5.1 Dolby Digital sound mix.


As far as the audio quality goes from most articles about movies of the week in audio technical magazines they are posted and mixed in days compared to the weeks of a feature film.


But the Picture Quality:

both CSI and most of these Movies of the Week (MOW)/miniseries are shot on 35mm film and telecined.


How much additional time and care are taken for these bigger budget projects as far as film Xfer and tape to tape final color correction compared to a weeklyl #1 Rated TV Series?



-kspaz
 

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Quote:
Originally posted by kspaz


How much additional time and care are taken for these bigger budget projects as far as film Xfer and tape to tape final color correction compared to a weeklyl #1 Rated TV Series?
Telecine transfer of dailies is a rather mechanical step that is done to established standards, usually on a "graveyard" shift (i.e., night shift) and is not usually intended to establish the final look of the program. There is no difference between television series, MOW's, or features to a more limited extent, in how this is done or how much time it takes. Final color correction is usually budgeted at somewhere between 10 and 16 hours for a one hour (i.e., approx. 44 minute) television series episode, including one hour to record, or "lay off" the corrected show. Some series, like CSI, require more massaging in color correction than other, more "straightforward" programs like, say, Boston Public, and are budgeted accordingly. This would also be the case with shows that are "cuttier," since more cuts require more time. MOW's vary, but most of them are done over a 3-4 day period (i.e., 24-32 hours), or a bit less than two series episodes.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Quote:
Originally posted by ThumperBoy
Helen of Troy wasn't in HD - it was shown letterboxed SD on USA, the USA channel is not HD.


Actually it was mastered in HD. Mark Valentine of Anatomy Media was quoted in "Pro Sound News" April 2003 issue.


"The series was transferred from film to HD. We conformed an HD master..."



thanks _mmost_ for the industry overview on color correction/telecine bay budget and time allowances.




-kspaz
 
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