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I'd just like to say Hi, this is my first post here...

Im 15, i live in Canada, and i got a pretty-okay Home Theater for the price... Toshiba 2109 DVD player, Kenwood VR407 AV Reciever, an Old (10 years+!!!) Mitsubishi 36" Direct-View TV (Still working great for its age), Paradigm Titan Mains, JBL Surrounds, Yamaha center channel, with a Passive 10" subwoofer powered by a Luxman Power amp...

The equipment is my dad's but i basically put everything together... http://www.avsforum.com/ubb/smile.gif I've been a member of the Home Theater Forum for more than a year, and i know quite alot about the hardware side of HT...


EXCEPT the projectors... I'm a newbie at the projector side of HT, with all the DLP, LCD, CRT, D-ILA, different kinds of projectors.


Does anybody have any definitions, or websites that explain LCD/DLP/CRT Front Projectors???

And what are the pros and cons of owning either one of these??? Like having to replace the bulbs??? Video quality on average???

My dad's hinting at considering one of these projectors, because our HT is upstairs, and it'd be hell to lug up a RPTV there...


I see so many rave posts about the NEC LT-150, for a price of $2,459, the price looks right (but my dad disagrees... http://www.avsforum.com/ubb/biggrin.gif ). How does this compare to say, a Sony VW10HT (I know the sony costs twice as much, but this is the only projector i have seen, so thats my reference point)??? My dad and I were totally astounded when we saw the Sony today, the vibrant colors, clear textures, solid non-interlaced image. We also demoed the VPL-CS2, which my dad thought was very poor compared to the VW10HT, but i thought it was good, considering it was half the price of the VW10HT...


Another local HT store has the NEC VT440 and VT450 projector on sale for $3000 and $6000 respectively (at least thats what i remember)... Anybody have any comments on these models???


Also, is it okay to use these projectors to view normal Television?


Thanks...


FWIW, we're looking at projectors less than $5000 USD, and planning to purchse one in the far future, in about 1-3 years, but a bit of background knowledge won't hurt, might even convince my dad to get one faster! http://www.avsforum.com/ubb/smile.gif
 

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If you have not been on this board for over a month, then it would appear that the LT-150 is very popular. What happened was Del made a mistake and it was practically giving them away, someone noticed it and let the word out on this forum. If your father is willing to go with something better, then you should go for it. Like Alan said Projector central is the best place to get some info on projectors.


DLP, LCD, D-ila are digital projectors, and they have their beginning in the PC world and conference rooms, as a monitor replacement that can be seen by all in the meeting


LCD: (liquid crystal display) think of it as a laptop screen that is see through, and in back of it is a giant flash light


DLP: (Digital Light Processing - created by TI) a bunch of mirrors in a grid. some of them will reflect the light toward the image (where it is lighter) and others away (where it will be darker)


D-ila: (Direct-Drive Image Light Amplifier - JVC) here is what they have on their web site
Quote:
Using a C-MOS-based reflective liquid crystal light valve upon which the image is written directly by the driving IC, JVC's D-ILA projector is able to produce images with an unparalleled combination of color, contrast, brightness, resolution and bandwidth. Each separated pixel in the D-ILA's X-Y matrix has a very thin aluminum reflective electrode. When voltage is applied to the selected pixel of the matrix, the liquid crystal modifies the transmission of light as it reaches the reflective surface (this is referred to as "birefringence"). Therefore, the net reflectivity of the D-ILA device changes. The non-reflective area of the D-ILA device is a minimal 7%, only serving to separate each pixel, eliminating the "screen door" effect that is so evident in LCD projectors. The rest of the D-ILA's electrode is reflective surface, thereby providing a high aperture ratio of more than 93%.
 
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