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Discussion Starter · #1 ·

Hi!  I have been asking my husband to hook up our electronics for months but keeps putting me off so while he is out of town I thought I would prove it could be done.  I am not familiar with cord names or how things work so please speak SLOWLY...:)

 

I have a vizio tv that is currently hooked up to my cable box.  I assume I did it correctly because it is working or maybe I just got lucky?  Back of tv is connected to cable box with a cord that has 5 plugs on it.  2 go into the cable box (audio out)  and then 3 into the cable box (component video).  I would like to hook my tv up to my receiver so that I can hear tv through the speakers.  HELP.  The receiver (Kenwood) is a surround sound type of receiver but is about 8 yrs old so may not have all of the new connections to it. 

 

So is there a way to connect all of these things without having to go buy some converter or fancy cords.

 

Would love to be able to tell my husband......I TOLD YOU SO!

 

Thanks for any info!  And thanks for helping those who are not good at any of this kind of thing!
 

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Hello, you will find lots of help here. For starters there are 2 different ways to connect your tv/cable box to the stereo. Either from the cable box or from the tv to your receiver. It all depends on what else you have connected to the radio.


We need some more information first. When you say cable box, do you know what kind? Comcast HD, Directv, etc?

Does it have an ouput that says Coaxial Audio or Optical Audio out.

Does the back of your radio have any Cable/Satellite Input options.


If you have the model number of the radio that would help.


Lets get those things figured out first.


The other option is to connect your TV to the receiver and anything that is coming out of your tv will play through your radio. In my opinion this is not the best way to do it. Because sometimes it will turn off the tv speakers and you will always have to have the radio on.
 

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Please tell us the models of TV, receiver, and cable box.  That way, we can look up online what connections they have, and can customize the advice for your situation.

 

Normally, the best way is to hook everything up to a receiver, and use its output to the TV.  Doing things this way means that you will use your receiver to switch sources (like DVD or BD player, cable box, whatever).  And it will often mean (especially with an old receiver) that you have to have the receiver on to watch anything.  But it is generally best because it allows the most options for sound, as TVs generally cannot pass all audio formats on to a receiver, and so it is typically best to hook sources directly to the receiver.  This will be particularly relevant if you have a complete set of surround speakers, as opposed to having just a pair of speakers.

 

Now, if you don't care about all of that, and you just want to get sound from the TV to the receiver, you will want to look on the back of your TV for the kind of audio outputs it has.  If it has line level audio outputs (as you describe from the cable box), you can use those into any input on your receiver (except NOT phono) that you want to use.  If the TV has an optical digital out, you will need an optical digital connector and your receiver will need an optical digital input.  The connector can be cheap; for example:

 

http://www.monoprice.com/Product?c_id=102&cp_id=10229&cs_id=1022901&p_id=1419&seq=1&format=2

 

But before you buy such a thing, you need to figure out what kind of connections your TV and receiver require.  (You will also want to make sure you buy something long enough for the placement of your TV and receiver.)  And since we do not know what models they are, we cannot tell you what connections they have.
 

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Sure. Simply disconnect the stereo audio cables from the TV and connect them to an input on the receiver. Then select that input on the receiver to hear the sound. That will give you stereo.


But, if you have an HD cable box, you can get true 5.1 audio by using a digital connection instead of the red/white stereo cables. There are two types of digital cables - optical or coax. They both work the same. The setup is a little more complicated than analog stereo. Make a digital connection between the cable box and the receiver. The complication is the digital assignment setup on the receiver where you associate an input such as Optical 1 with an activity name such as Cable TV or DVD. Then select that activity to hear the sound.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·

Thank all of you for responding.....needless to say I already have a headache trying to understand all of this mess.  I am unsure of the TV model (vizio 46inch flat screen) because it is on the wall and very heavy and I can not get to the back of it very easily.  Most of the connections are underneath but are not that easy to get to or see where I am plugging things in which is why my husband probably didn't want to bother with it.

 

 

 

The receiver is a Kentwood possibly VR-205  

 



 

 

 

This is back of the cable box



 

 

 front of cable box

 

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It would be best to know what options are possible with the TV output.  But, there is a way you can do this with what you have shown us, if you do not mind having to have the receiver on to hear anything at all.  Simply hook up the line level audio output from the cable box to the receiver (any input except the Phono input; I would probably use Video 1).  Have the video connected as you had it before (straight to the TV).  You then select Video 1 on the receiver to hear the sound, and you use the cable box and TV otherwise as before.  Note that the volume control of the TV will no longer affect the volume; for that, you will use the volume control on the receiver or its remote.

 

Now, a better way, if your TV has line level outputs, would be to hook the cable box up to the TV as before, and use the line level out to the receiver (hooking up to Video 1).  You then shut off the TV speakers in the TV menu (unless you like them on as well as the speakers hooked up to the receiver), and, if those line level outputs are variable, you can use the volume control of the TV (as well as the volume control on the receiver) to control the volume.

 

 

Edited to add:

 

Ideally, you would be using the HDMI connection from the cable box to your TV, not the component video.  Component video is the second best choice.  HDMI cables do not need to be expensive.  For example:

 

http://www.monoprice.com/Product?c_id=102&cp_id=10240&cs_id=1024008&p_id=3993&seq=1&format=2

 

If you have a Five Below store in your area, you might find a 6' and a 12' HDMI cable for $5 each (you only need one, not both).

 

HDMI can carry both video and audio, so you only need that one connection from the box to your TV, assuming that everything is set properly and functioning properly.
 

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The receiver doesn't have digital inputs and it looks like just two speakers are attached. So, simply move the audio cables from the TV to an input on the receiver and then select that input to hear the sound. You won't get sound from the TV anymore, however. If you want sound from both the TV and the receiver, then get the splitter described in an earlier post so that you can feed audio from the cable box to both the TV and the receiver. Or use HDMI from the cable box to the TV instead of the component video cables. But, you'd have to get at the back of the TV to do that.
 

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Guys it looks like she is running just a standard coaxial cable from cable box to tv. Her audio out of the cable box will still have audio and will send audio to the receiver. She can connect an RCA from her cable box audio out to the audio of the Video in on the receiver and call it good. She can then turn on the receiver when she wants and get audio through her speakers. Its just stereo speakers and she can still have audio to her tv. You guys are right the best thing would be to get an HDMI cable so she can enjoy the HD from the cable box her flat screen.
 

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I don't see the component video cables connected on the back of the cable box when looking at the phone on the right-hand side I do see Thick cable like a coaxial cable running up.


Edited: I just reread her original post and you are correct she is using component video. That does take away her audio out from the cable box. Looks like either a splitter or using the HDMI to the TV and the audio out to the receiver.
 
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