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Hey all, working on finishing up our house and I am struggling to find cables long enough for the runs between devices. I might...MIGHT be able to make a 10 ft cable work in my media room but that's going to be very close.

We're going to buy a 4k OLED TV and upgrade the receiver at the same time so I'm trying to knock out all my cabling now on the front end and allow for a bit of future proofing. IF that's not possible then steer me in the direction of an appropriate cable since I know my 4k UHD needs don't technically need 48gbps. All my prior cabling needs have been met by Bluejeans but they don't seem to have a 12 ft 48Gbps cable.

Any suggestions on a good 12 or 15ft 48Gbps HDMI 2.1 cable? If not then something else that will fully support the video and audio standards (other than 8k)?
 

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Hey all, working on finishing up our house and I am struggling to find cables long enough for the runs between devices. I might...MIGHT be able to make a 10 ft cable work in my media room but that's going to be very close.

We're going to buy a 4k OLED TV and upgrade the receiver at the same time so I'm trying to knock out all my cabling now on the front end and allow for a bit of future proofing. IF that's not possible then steer me in the direction of an appropriate cable since I know my 4k UHD needs don't technically need 48gbps. All my prior cabling needs have been met by Bluejeans but they don't seem to have a 12 ft 48Gbps cable.

Any suggestions on a good 12 or 15ft 48Gbps HDMI 2.1 cable? If not then something else that will fully support the video and audio standards (other than 8k)?
First off, if your cable run your cabling in-wall, the ONLY way to future proof is to install your cabling in a conduit.

If you want an ATC certified cable then either Zeskit or Ruipro (preferred) offer passive, certified (with the QR label of authenticity), Ultra High Speed HDMI cables. The maximum length is 16'. They cables are stiff so you need to be very mindful of bend radius (no sharp, 90º bends) and you don't want to put any undue strain on the HDMI ports. You want to be able to give yourself some extra cable length.

Your other option would be a hybrid fiber cable. They are active cables with a very generous bend radius but are not certified. I would recommend the Ruipro 8k, Gen-3/C. However, they are a bit expensive but might not be too bad at your length. As far as certification goes, it is not a guarantee of compatibility with your devices but more for consumer confidence. There are non-certified cables that may work just as well. It's still a bit of trial and error.

What ever cable type you get, lay it out on the floor prior to installation to make sure it meets your needs and expectations. Cable mfrs are kings at marketing and you'd be surprised what they can get away with with their marketing and product claims so take your time.

I'm surprised that BJC is not offering a cable that they have tested for the HDMI 2.1 option sets. I've used them in the past and they do make good cables. So does MediaBridge.
 

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First off, if your cable run your cabling in-wall, the ONLY way to future proof is to install your cabling in a conduit.

If you want an ATC certified cable then either Zeskit or Ruipro (preferred) offer passive, certified (with the QR label of authenticity), Ultra High Speed HDMI cables. The maximum length is 16'. They cables are stiff so you need to be very mindful of bend radius (no sharp, 90º bends) and you don't want to put any undue strain on the HDMI ports. You want to be able to give yourself some extra cable length.

Your other option would be a hybrid fiber cable. They are active cables with a very generous bend radius but are not certified. I would recommend the Ruipro 8k, Gen-3/C. However, they are a bit expensive but might not be too bad at your length. As far as certification goes, it is not a guarantee of compatibility with your devices but more for consumer confidence. There are non-certified cables that may work just as well. It's still a bit of trial and error.

What ever cable type you get, lay it out on the floor prior to installation to make sure it meets your needs and expectations. Cable mfrs are kings at marketing and you'd be surprised what they can get away with with their marketing and product claims so take your time.

I'm surprised that BJC is not offering a cable that they have tested for the HDMI 2.1 option sets. I've used them in the past and they do make good cables. So does MediaBridge.
I've got conduit/PVC run in the walls for the cable. Super stiff cables do present problems though you are correct on that. Zeskit has a lot of mixed reviews on amazon from not meeting advertised bandwidth to being too stiff to actually use.
I continue to read since posting and it seems like since I don't need the 48Gbps maybe forgo it since re-running cable in the future is easy with my setup. So find something that supports everything I need today? Never expected cables to require this much research, sheesh.
 

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I've got conduit/PVC run in the walls for the cable. Super stiff cables do present problems though you are correct on that. Zeskit has a lot of mixed reviews on amazon from not meeting advertised bandwidth to being too stiff to actually use.
I continue to read since posting and it seems like since I don't need the 48Gbps maybe forgo it since re-running cable in the future is easy with my setup. So find something that supports everything I need today? Never expected cables to require this much research, sheesh.
Passive certified cables will be stiff because of the wire gauge and construction. No way around that unless you go with a hybrid fiber cable or an active copper-only cable. I have had issues with a Zeskit cable that they sent me for testing purposes and emailed them about it. We did have a good correspondence going until I mentioned the problem cable. They have not responded to two of my emails so who knows what's going on with them. Ruipro also sent me some of their certified UHS HDMI cables, which I am currently using on the OLED upstairs, and have not had any issues with them (2m lengths).

You probably don't need 48Gbps because there isn't any source material that really requires that. 40Gbps seems to be what works well, so far. You have conduit installed so you're ahead of the game as far as future proofing goes and swapping out cables.

Video technology will always outpace connection technology, so there's still going to be some on-going trial and error to find a cable that will work reliably with your equipment and setup.
 

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I am having a great success with wireless (both high quality routers and Firesticks) and of course HDMI for local connections. The fiber cable into my home provides good service. But then it goes to cables to connectors and outlets. YOu can run Cat (6e) to the boxes, then plug the hdmi into those boxes.
 

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So far i've used these



Both have worked and have had no issues. On occasion i get some handshake issues but I also have


and i get the same handshake issues. The handshake issues i think are more correlated to CEC and my AVR with my TV. In any case all 3 seem to be working as expected and passing 4k120 with no issue when using my tvs hdmi 2.1 ports
 

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I am having a great success with wireless (both high quality routers and Firesticks) and of course HDMI for local connections. The fiber cable into my home provides good service. But then it goes to cables to connectors and outlets. YOu can run Cat (6e) to the boxes, then plug the hdmi into those boxes.
I run solid core CAT-6, non-CCA/CCS and not pre-terminated ethernet patch cable from the router to the bonus room upstairs, and then terminate with a punch down keystone wall jack. From there, ethernet to a gigabit swith and then ethernet to the HTS devices. HDMI from the devices to the receiver and then to the tv (OLED). The connections are solid and fast. No need for WiFi on the HTSs which frees that up for the 16 or so devices that we have connected to WiFi at any one time.
 
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