AVS Forum banner

Status
Not open for further replies.
1 - 10 of 10 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,886 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Is there anything that can be done about multipath? I live in an apartment

so I am limited to what size antenna I can use.:( :mad:
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
18,435 Posts
Lots of things. If you search for "antenna 101" you'll get a mile-long thread full of great suggestions and problem solving.


If you're working with a double bow tie or rabbit ears, frequently just moving the thing around the room will solve the problem. A lot of times, you have to change the position from station to station. Just like we had to in the "good ol days" BC: before cable.


Good luck


Doc
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,132 Posts
I think we talk, perhaps, too much about multipath. Usually, the main reason for lack of good reception is..not enough signal strength. In other words you are not pulling in station strong enough. A strong signal at the antenna head is best cure for multipath anyway.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
161 Posts
I'm sorry magic, but I'm going to have to disagree with you here -- I live approximately 20 - 25 miles from the transmitters off the ESB in NYC. I get great signal *strength*, but I have horrible multipath problems...Guess what... Leads to ghosts on analog (I have FOUR ghosts on NBC channel 4), and highly erratic signal "quality" on the digital stations...I can pull in CBS during the day, but not at night. Too many dropouts at night. This is from a window-mounted RS double-bowtie, which is more than adequate for UHF. The NBC situation is from my RS-VU75XR that's outside temporarily mounted at not too high off the ground, but points upwards at about 45 degrees.


But my point is that you're saying signal-strength is the cure-all, which it is not.


-Matt
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,132 Posts
Matt..


Did not say 'signal strength' was cure-all; did say signal strength was 'main reason' for lack of almost-perfect reception. I have found, after experimenting for 1 year or more, that signal strength can overcome many problems associated with poor reception. And, actually, you do not know for sure if your window-mounted RS double bow tie is adequate for the best reception. Mutipath is when 2 or more signals reach your antenna (tv set) at about the same time. Actually, there is only 'one' main signal and that is the one that must be raised to a high level to overcome the other 'false' signals. I speak only for myself and my experience..granted..each reception problem is somewhat unique. But I know, for sure, the higher you can raise the primary signal, the better. A high signal will tend to cancel out other shortcomings in the system. Of course, the greater the distance between antenna and transmitter, the harder you must work to maintain this high signal. At least, these are the conclusions I have reached. Good luck on your installation, my friend.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,886 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I am only 5 miles from the towers, but there is a hill between me and the

towers.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
18,435 Posts
Rga..

I assume you're getting some signal, otherwise you wouldn't be concerned about multipath. So, we're back to moving the antenna around the room. You haven't said what kind of antenna you're using, but I've suggested many times people start cheap and work up. At 5 miles, you should be able to work with a table-top double bow tie UHF antenna or a ten-buck set of UHF/VHF rabbit ears. Use a lot of cable so you can move the antenna around the room. I've seen posts from people who have to move the antenna to the center of the room.. on top of the piano.. by the window.. all to get different channels. Each channel may have a different "sweet spot" in your house.


On the other hand, there's a guy here in Cincinnati who's under five miles from the towers and can't get all of the stations thanks to the hillside he lives on. He's way down the side of a hill a whole suburb is built on top of. Way too thick for adequate signal penetration. But, as you said, it's multipath that's your problem, not signal.


Good luck


Doc
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
924 Posts
For an indoor antenna the Silver Sensor seems to be a decent directional antenna, the fact that it is more directional may help a bit with the multipath, in your situation you want to reject the bounced signals as much as possible. A directional antenna with a good f/b ratio and decent side rejection will help to "focus" on the strong primary signal.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
161 Posts
Quote:
Originally posted by magic123
Matt..


...


Actually, there is only 'one' main signal and that is the one that must be raised to a high level to overcome the other 'false' signals. I speak only for myself and my experience..granted..each reception problem is somewhat unique. But I know, for sure, the higher you can raise the primary signal, the better. A high signal will tend to cancel out other shortcomings in the system. ... Good luck on your installation, my friend.
Ah, I see what you mean now. I knew that was the case, but I wasn't thinking of it in that way. In that case, your point is taken. I think once I get the RS antenna roof-mounted, things should be pretty good.


-Matt
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,886 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I have tried the modified RS Double Bowtie and regular rabbit ears. The

signal is about the same. I have these set up on an old camera tripod, so

I can move it at will. I will try the Silver Sensor again this weekend. I have even tried the CM 4221 and the CM 80" yagi before with not luck.




If I can get it to work out on the grass away from my porch, I will just put

it out there at night when we want to watch something in HD. I get all of

my locals from Directv now.
 
1 - 10 of 10 Posts
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top