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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I moved into a new home that has 6 cat5e home runs wired to a central location

in the basement. I currently have the cat5e wires dangling at the junction box in

the basement. I checked the phone outlet upstairs and it looks like they are splitting the cat5e cable to connect the phone.

I don't understand how I get dial tone signals in all the jacks if the cat5e cables at the junction box are unhooked.


I want to set up a home network data and voice. Can I use some of these wires for data and some for phone? How?
 

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It sounds like the builder pulled these in for phone use only. If you don't have the option of running additional new cat5e or cat6 cables for a home network at this point, you CAN put both an ethernet network and a phone line on your existing cat5e's, but it's not a recommended practice. (See earlier threads in this forum which discuss the pros and cons in great detail.) Also the location where the existing cables end may not be ideal for your modem and/or home network router.


A single phone line normally uses the blue/wh pair, and 10baseT and 100baseT ethernet use two other pairs. (Sorry, a gigabit ethernet connection uses all 4 so you will be stuck with at most a 100MB network.) If you have a suitable place to mount a punch down block with RJ-45 jacks, you could first terminate all the existing cat5e's on it as if you were setting up an ethernet network. This will help maintain the "twist" in each pair right up to a jack which is important for good data performance. Then you can use off-the-shelf RJ-45 adapter/breakout jacks that split out pair 1 (the blue/wh one), and for each location that needs a phone jack, connect the blue/wh's in parallel with the phone line on the customer side of the telephone company's interface box, which should be mounted nearby. Finally you can use off-the-shelf RJ-45 patch cables to connect cables to those locations needing a data connection to your router. Hopefully the basement location has a nearby source of AC for the equipment. You may want to mount a piece of plywood and possibly a shelf to help mount equipment and manage the wiring neatly.


Of course there's still the wireless solution, leaving the cat5e's just for phone...
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by theocap
I moved into a new home that has 6 cat5e home runs wired to a central location

in the basement. I currently have the cat5e wires dangling at the junction box in

the basement. I checked the phone outlet upstairs and it looks like they are splitting the cat5e cable to connect the phone.

I don't understand how I get dial tone signals in all the jacks if the cat5e cables at the junction box are unhooked.


I want to set up a home network data and voice. Can I use some of these wires for data and some for phone? How?
Cat5 is commonly used as the cable of choice for both Data and Phone. In phone, typically only two or four (two line phone) pairs are used. Almost always, the blue/blue white pair are your line 1, and depending on which wiring standard was used, the green/green white or orange/orange white pair for the second line.


In Data, all four pairs are connected, but in reality, in a 10/100 type network, only two of the four pairs are really used.


So, while it is conceivable that one cat5 cable could carry both voice and data, it is not generally recommended due to noise issues. When your phone rings, it carries some higher voltages on the wires, which would likely interfere with your data transmissions.


So, to answer your question, if you can, use ONE cat5e cable for each phone jack, and ONE cat5e cable for each data jack. If you want to experiment, you can hook one data and one phone jack to a single cat5e cable, but can't guarantee performance.


Finally, if you have a dial tone, the cat5 is hooked up somewhere, but maybe not where you expect. Maybe the hanging cat5s were intended for data jacks and have never been used. Hopefully that's the case. I would start from your Phone Box on the outside of your house and open it up (don't worry, you are allowed by the telco company). See if you have a bunch of cat5's coming into the box and terminated to the incoming phone line with the blue/blue white pairs. If there is only one cat5 cable in the box, then you have a bridge somewhere in the house that takes that one cat5 cable and 'bridges' (connects) it to all the cat5's feeding each phone jack.


Robert


EDIT: Satori beat me to the 'SEND' button ;)
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks for the info.


I will check the source of the cat5e tonight.


Is it possible to use a structured wiring system that connects the

cat5e wires at the source.


This system uses a single cat5e to distribute data and voice.

Or can I just use some adaptor at the wall jack.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I checked the house and found that all of the cat5e wires are hooked together at the junction panel with white and blue wires.


Is there a way to use the other wire for data instead of running more wires.


Thanks
 

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Yes, as stated above, just terminate 2 pairs (orange/green) of each cable on a separate jack, terminated on the orange/green slots on the jack, at either end (Ethernet uses pins 1, 2, 3, and 6, which is orange/green on a standard 568B jack). Leave the brown pair for a future phone/fax line if you'd like. Then just use patch cables to your switch in the basement, and to your computer/game console at the other end.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Any Suggestions on what equipment I would need at the control panel to tye everything in. For example would I use a structured wiring box or something like that.

What equipment could be used to put the cat5e ends into at the control panel to make it neat and run any connections from there?
 
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