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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Watching the movie Apaloosa last night, and my 3-year old Pioneer receiver suddenly shut down during one of the gun-fight scenes. I didn't have the volume up particularly high, but the whole system shut down with the bursts of gun fire sound. I thought it might just be that disc, but the same thing happened with a movie on cable. Strange.


Does this sound at all familiar to anyone?
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pedro2 /forum/post/15563021


Watching the movie Apaloosa last night, and my 3-year old Pioneer receiver suddenly shut down during one of the gun-fight scenes. I didn't have the volume up particularly high, but the whole system shut down with the bursts of gun fire sound. I thought it might just be that disc, but the same thing happened with a movie on cable. Strange.


Does this sound at all familiar to anyone?

Sounds like you are getting some sort of electrical fault somewhere in your system that is causing the amps in your AVR to go into protection mode and shut down.


It's most likely that it's in your speaker connections/wires. So I would check and make sure there's no worn spots or shorts or connector problems. Stuff like that.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
ok, will check. Thanks for the quick reply. Hopefully it is just the speaker wire/connections....
 

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I had a Pioneer 1015 receiver and the only time it would shut down was when I had a bad speaker connection.


One of my speaker wires had become detached when we vaccuumed the room and the wires were touching. The Pioneer played fine (except no sound from the channel with the cables detached) until volume increased. Then the whole unit shut down.


Reattaching the speaker cable fixed the problem.


I hope your issue is as simple.
 

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It is also very possible that your receiver shut down because the amps were over-driven by sudden high current demand during those scenes mentioned. Some DVDs are recorded with greater dynamices than others, and that particular DVD may be one of those. Do check your speaker and cable connections, of course, but if this becomes a recurring problem you should consider either replacing the receiver with a higher output model, utilizing a separate power amp (if you have preouts), or replacing your speakers with ones with higher overall impedance and/or higher sensitivity. Meanwhile, adjusting your subwoofer crossover settings to be sure your main speakers are not working harder than necessary may be of some help. If you are running any of your speakers "large" then just setting them to "small" and using an appropriate low pass setting could fix the problem.
 
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