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Discussion Starter #1
Hi,


I'm located here in Atlanta and have a Dish 6000 with the OTA 8VSB module. I am using a large yagi antenna with about 100ft length of a single coax cable feed.


My CBS (channel 19.1) signal strength is about 80-95 consistently, but every 20-30 secs the picture freezes.


Any idea why this is occuring, how I can fix this or what the problem may be?


Thanks!
 

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Have you watched the signal strength for a while? Is it consistent at 80-90 or does it occasionally drop way down? There are several things that can cause this problem. Assuming that problems with the actual broadcast are the least likely, some possibilities with your own setup would be:


(1) Your cable run is pretty long. Do you have an inline amplifier? If not, one might help. About how far are you from the station?


(2) If you do already have an inline amp or you are just very close to the station, you could have ghosting (multipath) or a signal overload. If you have any type of inline amp that has an adjustment, try turning it down or even removing it.


(3) Of course, you might be able to get a more consistent signal by realigning the antenna in a slightly different direction. Have you tried that?


Mike
 

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Run the coax directly to the 6000, bypassing the Monster unit. (I read your other topic)
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Thanks for the tips.


First, I did plug the cable directly into the sat receiver.


I do not have an inline amp. All the amps i have gotten (rat shack, etc) seem to overload the signal. I think I may need a tuneable one of some kind.


And yes, I have been up on the roof with the walkie-talkies querying the wife re the signal strength. It is at its max, it seems.
 

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What if you move the antenna enough to where the highest reading you get is say 65-70%? Thats still plenty good enough as long as it doesnt continue having the same drop out problem anyway.
 

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I endorse DP1's suggestion. You most likely need to minimize the multipath component of the signal, which often can be accomplished by slightly mismisaiming the antenna such that the multipath signal falls on a so-called "null" direction in your antenna's reception pattern.


Without test gear, you probably can't tell where it is coming from. Try logging the signal reliability at five degree intervals over a measured stretch of time. In other words, aim it 20 degrees to the left and log the dropouts over five minutes, move it to fifteen degrees left and log them again, and so on until you get to twenty degrees to the right. Maybe you'll find a stable point there. If not, then go beyond twenty degrees off the transmission line.


Don't concern yourself if the average or maximum signal level at the most stable orientation is lower than the signal level your receiver reports when pointed on target. Above a certain level, increases in absolute signal strength are superfluous.
 

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You can also try weakening the signal by attenuating it. If you don't have time to go to Radio Shack and pick up an attenuator (they sell variable and fixed), then put some splitters on the input line to weaken the signal a little.
 
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