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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Now that we have moved to our home I'm finally mounting my dlp projector to the celing of my loft after keeping the projectors on the coffee table for 5 years in various apartments. But I'm a newbee when it comes to DIY ...


The mount itself is the one Chief has made for Dell projectors. The correct mount location is in between the ceiling joists / beams. By reading through past posts i gather that I should first put a supporting structure between the joists ... either a 2x4 (or wider) lumber or a plywood. Then attach the mount to this piece of wood. I'm assuming the supporting piece needs to be bolted flush to the ceiling. BTW, attic install is not a possibility for me.


I'm not clear about ...


1. Should I use a 2x4 or say 2x10, so that I can put 4 lag bolts ? What size bolts should I use ?


2. Or can I just use a plywood or for that matter plexiglass ? The joists are about 24 inches apart. Currently I have a light projector but will likely upgrade to a heavier DLP projector.


3. A Lowes employee suggested I could use a poplar / Hemlock piece since they are easier to stain / paint ... but they seem to be avaliable in just 1" thickness.


4. What size screws should I use to attach the mount to the piece of wood. If I use 2x4, I guess I can use atmost 1 1/2" long screws ? Is that good enough ?


5. What is the best way to paint the wood piece ... before installing or after ? Do I use the same dry wall paint or a wood paint of matching color ?
 

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You need to tell us more about the ceiling construction. Is it sheetrock over wood joist?
 

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Why not simply cut a piece of 3/4" Birch plywood to span the joists?


Here's what I would do if it were me:


1) Cut the piece wide enough to span the joists and bolt the mount to.

2) Round over the edges with a 1/2" roundover bit in a router.

3) Sand down the piece with 100 grit paper.

4) Predrill holes and countersink them for mounting the piece to the joists.

5) Mount the piece to joists using the predrilled holes and 2 1/2"-3" countersunk wood screws.

6) Spackle the screw holes.

7) Tape off around the piece where it meets the ceiling.

8) Hit it with some texture spray of whatever type your ceiling is. (Orange peel looks good and will cover the grain of the wood)

9) Paint the piece.

10) Mount the projector mount to the plywood piece using wood screws or lag bolts.


Just keep in mind you're mounting a DLP PJ, not a CRT PJ. No need to get into 2 x 4/6 and lag bolts for a job that normal wood screws will work fine on.
 

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Here's something one guy did:

http://www.samoht.com/wiki/wiki.pl?a..._The_Projector


I did something similar. But instead, mine spans 3 floor joists and just screws into the joists. This was required for me due to my ceiling material and the position of the joists in the room.


So, mine is simply a board with a routered edge that spans and screws into 3 floor joists. Then, it has bolt holes in the center for my Chief mount.


So, I think Skellyo is on the right track.
 

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Yeah, what kind of weight are we talking about? Under 10 pounds? If you've got 1/2 or 5/8" sheetrock and the weight of the PJ + mount is under 10lbs, I would use toggle bolts and never look back. I've seen drywall anchors rated at 30-50lbs of pull-out strength EACH. If you're worried, hang some weights off it to test it out. Let us know how much weight it takes to rip through the drywall.


Bobby
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Quote:
Originally Posted by DMF
You need to tell us more about the ceiling construction. Is it sheetrock over wood joist?
Yes, it is a new construction ... with sheetrock over wood joist.

Quote:
Originally Posted by skellyo
Why not simply cut a piece of 3/4" Birch plywood to span the joists?


Here's what I would do if it were me:


....
Thanks for the detailed responce. I don't yet understant all the terminology ... but I'll find out.

Quote:
Originally Posted by reaper
Here's something one guy did:

http://www.samoht.com/wiki/wiki.pl?a..._The_Projector


I did something similar. But instead, mine spans 3 floor joists and just screws into the joists. This was required for me due to my ceiling material and the position of the joists in the room.


So, mine is simply a board with a routered edge that spans and screws into 3 floor joists. Then, it has bolt holes in the center for my Chief mount.


So, I think Skellyo is on the right track.
Thanks for the link. What type of board did you use ? What size bolts did you use for the chief mount ? I'll be mounting flush ...


Quote:
Originally Posted by Bobby_M
Yeah, what kind of weight are we talking about? Under 10 pounds? If you've got 1/2 or 5/8" sheetrock and the weight of the PJ + mount is under 10lbs, I would use toggle bolts and never look back. I've seen drywall anchors rated at 30-50lbs of pull-out strength EACH. If you're worried, hang some weights off it to test it out. Let us know how much weight it takes to rip through the drywall.


Bobby
The projector that I've now is under 10 pounds ... but my next projector is unlikely to be a portable one. Probably a Benq7700 or some such projector which might weigh in at 15 pounds.


While this still may be okay with toggle bolts, I would feel more secure over the long term with a better structural support.
 

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toggle bolts will most lilely do fine to hold the projector, but you've got to be carefull when using your hands to make adjustements. Probably still okay for this, but if someone were to reach up and pull on the PJ (assuming it's low enough they could) you don't want them to find out by surprise that it's not mounted to a solid joist.
 

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I used Toggler (TM) brand Snaptoggle Toggle Bolt anchors right into the drywall in the ceiling - http://www.toggler.com


Home Depot has them under the Hilti brand/packaging, near concrete drilling equipment (in my Home Depot, it wasn't on the aisle with the toggle bolts and nobody knew what I was looking for, so you might be on your own).


According to the Toggler site, these things hold:

http://www.toggler.com/products_hwh_technical.html


Tensile Test Results (Ultimate results in pounds)


Anchor / Grip Range 1/2" Drywall 5/8" Drywall Concrete 1/2" Steel Plate

BA 3/16"-24 238 356 802* 918


I think your 15 LB projector is just fine!


I think I could swing on mine (but I haven't tried)...
 

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Toggle bolts work just fine. That is unless the drywall ever gets wet. Imagine the dishwasher, ice cube maker, toilet, washing machine, shower, bath tub, aquarium, hot tub, water bed etc ever starts leaking one or two stories above. Once the drywall get's saturated Mr. projector meet Mr floor. I put up a piece of plywood, lag bolted to the joists and then the mount. It's $3 insurance for your projector.
 

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The "joist spanner" mentioned in the first post is a reliable solution. Similar items are available at HD or Lowes for mounting ceiling fans and heavy light fixtures. Since they are rated for 50 lbs., they can easily support a DLP projector. One manufacturer is Thomas & Betts. Look for an "Old Work Bar Hanger".
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bobby_M
Yeah, what kind of weight are we talking about? Under 10 pounds? If you've got 1/2 or 5/8" sheetrock and the weight of the PJ + mount is under 10lbs, I would use toggle bolts and never look back.
Unless there's some chance of the drywall getting wet or a person can reach the projector.

Quote:
I've seen drywall anchors rated at 30-50lbs of pull-out strength EACH.
In shear. I did not hesitate to use such fasteners to hang a 60 pound screen on a wall.


It does not take much to pull/knock a hole in a piece of drywall supported by lumber on 16" centers. I'd become increasingly worried as the projector mount protruded beneath the ceiling.
 

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If the joists run across the room, mount the projector a little closer and zoom out a little. And projectors have different throw distances so your next projector might be mounted in a different spot.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Quote:
Originally Posted by BIGmouthinDC
Toggle bolts work just fine.

...

I put up a piece of plywood, lag bolted to the joists and then the mount. It's $3 insurance for your projector.
I think this is a good approach. Also, it makes adjustments to the mount easier. I'll probably go with this ...

Quote:
Originally Posted by Toxarch
If the joists run across the room, mount the projector a little closer and zoom out a little. And projectors have different throw distances so your next projector might be mounted in a different spot.
Oh yes. I've been working on this. I looked at all the current projectors I've an interest in and their throw ranges for the size of image I want (about 9' wide). Unfortunately Dell has a really long throw (but not long enough for me to wall mount it) ... and the ones I'm considering short throws. Infact the ranges don't even overlap. I have decided to mount the projector around 17' and live with a smaller image for now.

Quote:
Originally Posted by maddogmc
The "joist spanner" mentioned in the first post is a reliable solution. Similar items are available at HD or Lowes for mounting ceiling fans and heavy light fixtures. Since they are rated for 50 lbs., they can easily support a DLP projector. One manufacturer is Thomas & Betts. Look for an "Old Work Bar Hanger".
I looked at some of them. They all seem to need access to the attic ...
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by nataraj
I looked at some of them. They all seem to need access to the attic ...


They may look like they need access to the attic but actually you can install the entire unit through the hole you cut out for the box. There is no need to have access to the attic.


There are spikes on the ends the drive into the wood stud. This helps to support the bracket and prevent it from moving around.


Laters,

Jeff
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Quote:
Originally Posted by eq_shadimar
They may look like they need access to the attic but actually you can install the entire unit through the hole you cut out for the box. There is no need to have access to the attic.


There are spikes on the ends the drive into the wood stud. This helps to support the bracket and prevent it from moving around.


Laters,

Jeff
Can they be installed below the sheet rock / dry wall ?
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by nataraj
I looked at some of them. They all seem to need access to the attic ...
T&B "old work" installation instructions.

http://www.tnb.com/shared/inst/205831.tif


Good luck!
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by nataraj
Can they be installed below the sheet rock / dry wall ?
If you want to install something below the sheetrock, just screw a piece of 3/4" plywood or 2x4 across the joist and hang your projector from it.
 

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Granted, my basement is a new construction... but here's what I'm doing with my 10ft ceiling.


The trusses run from the back of the room to the front where the screen is. IE, the trusses run perpendicular to the screen. After the sheet rock goes up, a hole will be cut in the ceiling for the AV cables to the projector.


The guy who's making our cherry cabinets for the bathroom, study, and kitchen is going to make me 36"W x 27"D x 12"H decorative cherry box to mount on the ceiling. He's simply going to screw a couple 2x4's paralles to the screen, spaced apart so one 2x4 will be along the inside edge of the front of the box and the other will be along the inside edge of the back of the box. The box goes flush against the ceiling, then screwed from the sides to the 2x4's on the ceiling. This will support the projector. The screws will be covered by decorative matching molding.


The box itself will have a small vertical window in the back, inside of which my Monster battery backup will stick out maybe 1/4" so you can see all the lights on the unit.


The projector will mount beneath the box on an 8" fixed extention using a Chief mount.


I thought it would look goofy to have a 2ft pole sticking out of the ceiling with the projector hanging from it... so I came up with the idea of this box, in which I can put a back up battery source... it'll also have 110v power outlet inside. The back of the box is going to have a cabinet door on it for access.
 
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