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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I had somone optimize my Sharp 46" LC-46D64U LCD. The following settings under advance he did not touch:


CMS Hue - 6 colours (R,Y,G,C,B,M)


CMS Saturation - 6 colours (R,Y,G,C,B,M)


Right now all of them are set to the value 0. Are these settings to do with the Grayscale?


Thanks.
 

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no, they are CMS (color management system) controls.


Greyscale is about the color of white, those controls are about adjusting the location of the primaries and secondaries.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·

Quote:
Originally Posted by sotti /forum/post/18167047


no, they are CMS (color management system) controls.


Greyscale is about the color of white, those controls are about adjusting the location of the primaries and secondaries.

Thanks for the reply.


Am I losing out by not having those adjusted? Or will there be a big difference if those CMS settings are optimized?
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by sm30 /forum/post/18167211


Am I losing out by not having those adjusted? Or will there be a big difference if those CMS settings are optimized?

It depends how far out the gamut is prior to any adjustment. It could make a very small difference or a quite profound one.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·

Quote:
Originally Posted by TomHuffman /forum/post/18167294


It depends how far out the gamut is prior to any adjustment. It could make a very small difference or a quite profound one.

How can I find out? What would I need to test?


Thanks.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·

Quote:
Originally Posted by ChrisWiggles /forum/post/18168061


Well, you'd need to measure the color gamut obviously.

I get that part, sorry what I meant was do I need a special tool or can I use the DVE dvd or similar.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by sm30 /forum/post/18168129


I get that part, sorry what I meant was do I need a special tool or can I use the DVE dvd or similar.

You need a tool.


Some colorimeters can do, but you pretty much need a spectrometer to do it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·

Quote:
Originally Posted by sotti /forum/post/18168136


You need a tool.


Some colorimeters can do, but you pretty much need a spectrometer to do it.

Thanks. As you can see I am a beginner and have a lot of questions
 

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Without spending at least several hundred dollars, or thousands, the best you can really do is look at content and colorbars and see whether things seem too oversaturated to you, too brilliantly red, too brilliantly green, etc.


I'm not familiar with this display, so I don't know how good or not-good the native gamut is, it might be not bad.


Even if it's a little bit off, if it doesn't bother you...


As they say ignorance is bliss.
 

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Greetings


If the pod is used on a display where the gamut is already close ... then it can work. If the gamut is way out ... then the pod won't work right.


regards
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Michael TLV /forum/post/18168682


Greetings


If the pod is used on a display where the gamut is already close ... then it can work. If the gamut is way out ... then the pod won't work right.


regards

So I should probably be looking at a i1 Pro as the next step up.
 

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or the munki ...


regards
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by jkcheng122 /forum/post/18168470


Will a colorimeter not be sufficient for measuring gamut? I'm currently using Chroma 5 with CalMAN.

chroma5 is widely accepted as the minimum colorimeter to do gamut.


meters below the chroma 5 are not recomended at all.


people will go either way about the chroma5 depending on their own personal standards for what is acceptable error.
 

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Quick trick:


Pick a program, preferrably a high quality live feed and find someone on it with skin tones similar to yours. Hold your hand up so that you can see both the screen and your hand. Adjust saturation and hue so that the flesh tones are about the same. Double-check that on another channel.


Voila!
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by cctvtech /forum/post/18168719


Quick trick:


Pick a program, preferrably a high quality live feed and find someone on it with skin tones similar to yours. Hold your hand up so that you can see both the screen and your hand. Adjust saturation and hue so that the flesh tones are about the same. Double-check that on another channel.


Voila!

Terrible idea, this one.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by cctvtech /forum/post/18168719


Quick trick:


Pick a program, preferrably a high quality live feed and find someone on it with skin tones similar to yours. Hold your hand up so that you can see both the screen and your hand. Adjust saturation and hue so that the flesh tones are about the same. Double-check that on another channel.


Voila!

w/o knowing the person in real life I wouldn't know if his/her skin tone would be similar to mine or not.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by cctvtech /forum/post/18168719


Quick trick:


Pick a program, preferrably a high quality live feed and find someone on it with skin tones similar to yours. Hold your hand up so that you can see both the screen and your hand. Adjust saturation and hue so that the flesh tones are about the same. Double-check that on another channel.


Voila!

make sure to do this while watching Underworld. also, do it in a room with no lights
 

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It's worked for me for 40 years. It may not be the most accurate method, but it comes out a heck of a lot better than the cartoonish, oversaturated, flushed-looking color I often saw on customers' TVs when I used to service them. And you can tell approximate flesh tones on TV screens. Obviously, you wouldn't compare your skin tone to that of someone of a different race but, in general, the results are pretty good; especially if you use a number of subjects. The one caveat is that grey scale has to be set first or the result will be skewed.


Try it before you scoff!
 
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