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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
There is a principle of sound structure:

a.) You build the frame.

b.) Using the frame, you fill in the frame.


Frame sequential 3D shows the eyes two pictures, each time the eye has a focus.

That is, the eye see's the picture, then must move converge that eye to that picture.

So each time the new frame is shown to a new eye, that eye must converge that eye.


One frame of the source is 4 frames shown to the eyes; the eye-singular, must converge 2 different times.

Add in large convergence due to large parallax, and the eye must move a long way to converge, twice per source frame.


Add in ghosting and this adds more eye strain. But I want to point out that even with dlp you can get eye strain due to it using frame sequential 3D, and this meaning your moving the eyes like a iguana moves his eyes in two different directions.


With time parallel 3D, the picture is constantly shown to both eyes. So the eye isn't darting to converge all the time and this would means less spastic eye movement, and thus less eye strain.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Time Sequential 3D TV's make your eyes move like Iguana's eyes - looking in two different directions.
 

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I can play 12 hours straight with DLP projector without eye strain, this includes no sense of eye strain during a toilet break, nor afterwards.


This thing is either personal , or overrated. By the way, Im getting very close building my time parallel setup, yes, I expect it to be more "calm", but nothing earth shattering.


Maybe for relaxing videos you want the "calmness" of time parallel, but all this talk about action games don't go well with sequential , is waaay overrated.


When it comes to action games I'd sure prefer side by side 120hz 2500*720 projection for more FOV.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Not only do the eyes move in different directions, spastically, but with desynchronization you may be moving the eyes to see two different pictures instead of the same picture.


The fact you can roll your eyes in two different directions for twelve hours with no pain is not changing the fact it's not natural to do so.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by 8:13 /forum/post/19571327


Not only do the eyes move in different directions, spastically, but with desynchronization you may be moving the eyes to see two different pictures instead of the same picture.


The fact you can roll your eyes in two different directions for twelve hours with no pain is not changing the fact it's not natural to do so.

So HMD guys goin to exploit this mumbo jumbo? Tomorrow Apple starts selling HMD and all that's sequential is crap? I don't buy it .
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I wonder if they will advertise it tomorrow?
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by 8:13 /forum/post/19571501


I wonder if they will advertise it tomorrow?

It is due to brain's intense search activity.

Excessive parallax, flicker, mismatch in color or intensity forces the brain to continuously search and analyze a scene

to provide navigational ques. The brain stays in state of confusion as it cannot estimate position of some or all objects in a scene.

A prolonged search is the source of headaches.

It happens when one is viewing simulated or natural stereoscopic scenes.


Mathew Orman
 

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Excessive divergence/convergence can also lead to eyestrain/motion sickness.


Also, accommodation. As our eyes toe in and out to see near and far things on the TV, the lens has to focus on the plane the TV screen is actually on, which might feel odd.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by cakefoo /forum/post/19575646


Excessive divergence/convergence can also lead to eyestrain/motion sickness.


Also, accommodation. As our eyes toe in and out to see near and far things on the TV, the lens has to focus on the plane the TV screen is actually on, which might feel odd.

There is no evidence that blurry images are the source of eye strain.


Mathew Orman
 
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