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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi all!


Does anyone know where I can go to buy a meter reading of how low or high your speakers can go? For example: I would like to know how low my subwoofer can go down to (Hz).


Do you know the brand that people are using to test out sound levels? And I am not talking about the Sound Meter which show you the db levels.


My subwoofer claim that it can go down to 11Hz but I want to test it out myself in my own home to see how low it can go in Hz and NOT in db.


Thanks!
 

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I'm curious, what model is your sub. It may or may not be accurate down to 11 HZ.

Also, you could purchase a CD test disc with sweeping test tones that go down to about 10 HZ.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by mantaraydesign /forum/post/16987611


Hi all!


Does anyone know where I can go to buy a meter reading of how low or high your speakers can go? For example: I would like to know how low my subwoofer can go down to (Hz).


Do you know the brand that people are using to test out sound levels? And I am not talking about the Sound Meter which show you the db levels.


My subwoofer claim that it can go down to 11Hz but I want to test it out myself in my own home to see how low it can go in Hz and NOT in db.


Thanks!

Real easy for a quick check: TrueRTA at http://www.trueaudio.com/rta_abt1.htm
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Kal Rubinson,


Have you tried the software already and does it work? Also, you can use a regular MIC that you can buy it from Walmart or do you have to buy the MIC recommended on their website?



Espo77,


My subwoofer is the Definitive Technology Supercube Reference. If you use the CD test disc, how do you still determine if your subwoofer goes can go down to 10Hz? Because I don't have the meter to show numbers. I suppose if my subwoofer blows up at 10Hz than I guess it didn't make to 10Hz. HA HA HA
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by mantaraydesign /forum/post/16987842


Kal Rubinson,


Have you tried the software already and does it work? Also, you can use a regular MIC that you can buy it from Walmart or do you have to buy the MIC recommended on their website?

I use the hi-rez version. As to the MIC choice, it depends on how much accuracy you need and what your computer will accept.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by mantaraydesign /forum/post/16987842


Kal Rubinson,


Have you tried the software already and does it work? Also, you can use a regular MIC that you can buy it from Walmart or do you have to buy the MIC recommended on their website?



Espo77,


My subwoofer is the Definitive Technology Supercube Reference. If you use the CD test disc, how do you still determine if your subwoofer goes can go down to 10Hz? Because I don't have the meter to show numbers. I suppose if my subwoofer blows up at 10Hz than I guess it didn't make to 10Hz. HA HA HA

Well, If your sub specs indicate it's ability to go down to 11 HZ and you play a 10 HZ tone.............
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by mantaraydesign /forum/post/16987611


Hi all!


Does anyone know where I can go to buy a meter reading of how low or high your speakers can go? For example: I would like to know how low my subwoofer can go down to (Hz).


Do you know the brand that people are using to test out sound levels? And I am not talking about the Sound Meter which show you the db levels.


My subwoofer claim that it can go down to 11Hz but I want to test it out myself in my own home to see how low it can go in Hz and NOT in db.


Thanks!

You need to buy a calibrated mic since low frequencies are very inaccurate on most mics.


Here are my tools....

The ECM8000 mic (professionally calibrated)

REW software to measure subwoofer performance in room

M-audio pre-mobile USB sound card (It has phantom power for the Mic)

Notebook PC


Note: room gain will boost low frequencies so you really can not find out how low your sub goes unless you measure it outside or in an extremely big room.



Go to this link to get the details

http://www.hometheatershack.com/forums/rew-forum/


What sub is it?


You do realize that to hear/feel 10Hz you have to give it substantial power....some sub manufacturers play the specs game and say their sub is flat to 10Hz BUT they forget to mention that its flat to 10Hz @ 90dB which is really meaningless since SPL needs to be really high for the ultra low frequencies to matter.
 

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Quote:
Real easy for a quick check: TrueRTA at http://www.trueaudio.com/rta_abt1.htm

I like Arta better then TrueRTA and the newest freeware called HOLMimpulse found on the Diyaudio forums has some people saying its the best period. Geddes says its the first time he has switched software in 20 years.
 

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But it sounds to me like first you need a little more understanding of what it is you're looking to do... you say "how low it can go in Hz, not in dB"

The two can't really be separated in this application. How low a sub can go is generally defined as it's -3dB point, to explain further, if the sub's response in most of it's frequency region was flat, and as you go lower it starts to decrease, the frequency where it's 3dB down from the measurement in the flat region is said to be the limit of it's low end. Sure, it puts out below that, but at ever decreasing numbers.

And like someone else said, to compare against a manufacturer's spec, unless it's spec'ed as "in-room" response (which would be a cop-out on the MFRs part), you need to take that measurement in an anechoic environment, for most of us the closest thing would be outside, preferably a big parking lot or football field or the like...

Alternatively, if it's a well known well loved sub by many, there's a decent chance someone else has done that kind of test, do a search for craigsub rankings, and look here...
http://www.hometheatershack.com/forums/subwoofer-tests/
 

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You can use a radioshack meter with rew and just use the correction file for it just to get a rough idea. That will put you out about $45 plus a couple $cables.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by glaufman /forum/post/16992759


And like someone else said, to compare against a manufacturer's spec, unless it's spec'ed as "in-room" response (which would be a cop-out on the MFRs part), you need to take that measurement in an anechoic environment...

Even this approach assumes that the manufacturer's spec was arrived at under controlled and widely accepted conditions. Unfortunately, the manufacturers are all over the place with their specs.


The specific manufacturer in question in this thread, Definitive Technology, seems to rate the bass extension more generously, on average, than the rest of the industry. IOW, while Def Tech might rate a speaker as playing down to 25Hz, most other companies would give a spec like 35Hz for the same speaker. Perhaps Def Tech uses "in room" measurements for their specs, or they use a wider tolerance than +/- 3dB (note that their specs do not list the tolerance).


-Max
 

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I think I read on the DT thread that they use +/- 10db
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by maxcooper /forum/post/16995882


Even this approach assumes that the manufacturer's spec was arrived at under controlled and widely accepted conditions. Unfortunately, the manufacturers are all over the place with their specs.


The specific manufacturer in question in this thread, Definitive Technology, seems to rate the bass extension more generously, on average, than the rest of the industry. IOW, while Def Tech might rate a speaker as playing down to 25Hz, most other companies would give a spec like 35Hz for the same speaker. Perhaps Def Tech uses "in room" measurements for their specs, or they use a wider tolerance than +/- 3dB (note that their specs do not list the tolerance).


-Max
Quote:
Originally Posted by audio0947 /forum/post/0


I think I read on the DT thread that they use +/- 10db

Someone in another thread commented, some mfrs write specs to show you how good their equipment is, others write specs to hide how bad their equipment is. If ti's true they use +/- 10dB, I will stay away from their products.
 
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