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So, here's my very first post on the AVS forum. Been lurking a long time.


I'm slowly putting together a home theater... and I've been gathering various components to see what I can do on a cheapskate budget. Part of my fool's quest has been to see how my budget DLP projector behaves in a variety of input situations, to see which I like best.


So after some reading on this fine forum, I started looking for a cheap VGA transcoder for my consoles that run in 480p modes. And after reading a lot about the Neoyas, Vdigis and Mayflashes, I found a review for this HK product called the "Digital High Box". Can't post a URL yet, just search "high box vga wii" in Google. I decided to give one of these a shot.


It came in today. I tested it a little tonight on a regular Xbox and some small monitors I had set up (PJ isn't mounted yet), outputting 480p over official component cables. I'm no Electrical Engineer, so some inept comments may follow. Please be kind.


After playing a bit, the first thing that struck me was how it handled bright colors nearing white. At first I thought it was clipping off the high range at 235 (like some other transcoders are said to do), but then, playing some older Genesis games on an emulator, I saw some rather strong white levels. It seemed to be fiddling with the values, doing some dynamic kind of expansion in the whites at blacks. Most of the time, it created some really nice images.


Feature-wise, it has a rudimentary menu system controlled by three buttons. Pressing them has a different effect than tapping them--takes some practice. No remote here, but it does seem to remember all the settings. The menu can be seen in the aforementioned review--you get brightness/contrast/saturation/hue controls, and they actually make a significant difference when you slide them away from 50. And overdriving the brightness seems capable of bleaching the whites into the upper end of the RGB spectrum, so I don't think there's any hard limiting going on there.


It line doubles 480i, but it does it without any discernible lag. Good for setting up game systems to switch from 480i to something else. If you set the resolution to something that isn't the transcoded resolution (like 480p input and 800x600 setting), the image actually gets scaled without much latency at all. It's not a great scaler, but not the worst I've seen either.


There are some features I cannot really test, since I do not have a 1080p display or output device--there are two modes of 1080p output, a regular and a "reduced blanking" mode. And it's kind of hard for me to test any reduction scaling without a high resolution component output. Sorry.


So, moving on, after seeing the scaler and the gamma adjustments it seemed to be doing, I had to see what's inside.


I unscrewed the case, and found a neatly-designed case-filling PCB inside, with a big fat video processor on it--the Tvia 5725. Hit Google with that, and shock--the company has a webpage, tvia.com, and a page on the 5725.


After reading the specifications, it's more than I thought I was getting for 50 bucks, that's for sure. And those specs say it's performing white and black level expansion, like I thought I saw. My next task will be giving it some test patterns, and seeing how it stacks up against the component inputs on my DLP projector.


And last, the manual and box are awesome. From the front of the box: "Clarity of your colorful horizon / Creation of most respectable quality". I think that says it all right there. Go Hong Kong, you rule.


If you got questions, want pictures, or want me to try something on it, I'm open to it.


- Q
 

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Sorry to bump this thread, but I have a question for you. Does it only accept 480i, or can it accept and transcode 480p/720p/1080i as well?
 

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I have 2 boxes like this. The HDBox Pro and the HD-360. They both have component inputs and output via VGA. The HD-360 will also take in HDMI. Both will pretty much take 480i to 1080p via the component jacks. The HD-360 will only take 1080i via the hdmi jack. The big thing on these boxes is that it will let you set the output of the box to computer resolutions from 640x480 to 1920x1200 give or take a few odd resolutions. So in testing it out I sent a PS3 output for a game at 1080p on a lcd pc monitor at 800x600. Did it look ok? Yup. Was it crazy awesome high def? No. But it did work.


I have been using these to do video games and blurays on a few older high lumen projectors that i have and i am happy with them. I was having a few problems with a weird refresh line that was coming from a crappy power supply that came with it. I spent a few bucks and bought and built a isolated power supply that can drive both units at the same time and it fixed the problem. For the cost of the box(s) I would give it a try just to see if it would work for you.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by P719C1 /forum/post/20563119


Sorry to bump this thread, but I have a question for you. Does it only accept 480i, or can it accept and transcode 480p/720p/1080i as well?
Quote:
Originally Posted by Quamzin /forum/post/14219011


If you set the resolution to something that isn't the transcoded resolution (like 480p input and 800x600 setting), the image actually gets scaled without much latency at all. It's not a great scaler, but not the worst I've seen either.


There are some features I cannot really test, since I do not have a 1080p display or output device--there are two modes of 1080p output, a regular and a "reduced blanking" mode.

Could have gotten my answer had I read original post more carefully--my bad!

Quote:
Originally Posted by drewman21 /forum/post/20613143


The HD-360 will only take 1080i via the hdmi jack.

1080i only? Not 1080p?
 
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