AVS Forum banner
Status
Not open for further replies.
1 - 11 of 11 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
752 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,584 Posts
Anyone who has tried to use X10 over power lines knows the pitfall of this sort of pipeline.


It sometimes works, but it totally depends on how and when your house was wired, and if/where you have any surge/noise protectors.


House age doesn't matter. I live in a 3 year old home, and X10 will only work within individual circuits, and ONLY if there aren't any surge/noise protectors on that circuit.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
778 Posts
That's hilarious!! Potomac is the highest priced community in the highest per capita county in the country. Lynda Carter, Sly Stallone, Patrick Ewing all have (had) homes in this area which also houses high powered lobbyists, developers and attorneys. They really need to save on Broadband, as opposed to some inner city community.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
28 Posts
Quote:
Originally posted by dandrewk
Anyone who has tried to use X10 over power lines knows the pitfall of this sort of pipeline.


It sometimes works, but it totally depends on how and when your house was wired, and if/where you have any surge/noise protectors.


House age doesn't matter. I live in a 3 year old home, and X10 will only work within individual circuits, and ONLY if there aren't any surge/noise protectors on that circuit.
While I agree, X10 has pitfalls. My entire house is x10'd (every single wall switch and light in my house is X10-able), and I have problems here and there. But you have to remember, X10 is a very, very old technology (30 years now? or maybe 20), while the powerline networking stuff is only a few years old. In the same house where I DO have occasional problems with X10, I have not had ONE single problem with my powerline network. I have a 100mbit network upstairs, and some tivos and an HTPC downstairs. I'm in a townhouse, and wiring through the walls was just impossible. I setup the Linksys homeplug bridges, one into a switch upstairs, one into a switch downstairs, and both switches talk to each other beautifully. Sure, the speed is slow (2-10mbit depending on conditions), but 2mbit is still faster than *most* broadband connections. As long as they can keep the speeds pumped up before it gets to an individual house, there shouldn't be a lot of problems with this technology.


The homeplug group has made a lot of strides in the past couple of years. I've been watching and waiting for a while for powerline based solutions for networking, audio/video transport, etc. When the powerline networking stuff started to make its way to the market, I nabbed it as fast as I could (prior to this setup, I had a cat5 cable running through a hall way, around a wall, up a flight of stairs, through another hallway, and into the office, very messy).


My buddy lives in a rented house that's about 90 years old. The wiring in that place is TERRIBLE. X10 is almost unusable (he tried). The majority of the electrical wiring is that old type of wiring that had the cloth insulation around it rather than the current rubber/plastic/whatever. However, we tested out the linksys powerline networking bridges at his house, and it worked like a champ. Ping times stay consistent, and he was getting about 7mbps with no spikes or drops in performance. I was really impressed, especially considering the devices I own are of the homeplug 1.0 standards, and the homeplug 2.0 standards is supposed to make things faster, more reliable, and just all-around better. Hard to fathom, considering I'm already getting 100% reliability. If it speeds up, hurrah!


I'd like to see this technology prosper. Its a neat idea, everyone who has a need for it has the wiring already in their house in abundance, and those who don't have it, won't need it (no electricity = no networking!). The only obvious people who'd miss out are those who have disconnected their house from the power grid for one reason or another (solar energy, their own windmill, their own nuclear reactor, dreaming of an Amish paradise, whatever). For those poeple, wireless ISPs will be around in abundance by then.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
21 Posts
Ego, I take it you are just using the homeplug home networking products and not this new powerline ISP correct? Your external connection would be via something more conventional like cable or dsl, right? 2-10mbit would be good from an ISP, but isn't much for a home network.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
28 Posts
right, all my stuff is internal, I have DSL for real internet service. I was pointing out that this technology is much more reliable than X10, which is what dandrewk was using as a comparison as to why this technology won't catch on.


Yes, I realize 2-10mbit sucks, but all its for is connecting my HTPC and my two TiVos to my network. None of those 3 boxes uses more than 1mbit/s at any time, so the bandwidth is plenty for what I'm using it for. Now once I start sharing HD content throughout the network FROM the HTPC, the networking scheme IS going to change. :) I can't imagine transferring 10gig files around over 2mbit. :)


Anyways, I was just trying to make a case for how this technology certainly can work. As long as they get 1-2mbit to the customer (EACH customer), then it'd be a very good competetor to DSL/Cable/Wireless/Satellite/etc.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,496 Posts
Excuse me! Don't these powerlines have transformers on their lines? So this "Broadband" service is supposedly spaning these transformers which were designed for 60 Hz service. This is one of the main limits of X10, you can control anything as long as they do not cross through a transformer (like the ones on the poles outside your house).


Remembering your electrical theory, what do coils do? Pass AC but block DC so it can't be a digital signal imposed on the AC wave. Also I believe these transformers have iron cores (not air cores) again limiting frequency so I doubt that it could be an AC signal modulated on the 60 Hz AC wave.


Sounds like a left over April Fools joke to me.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,125 Posts
No... it's real.


I used to work for a company that provided video on demand servers for telecom/ISP customers, and a power company in Kentucky after it was recently deregulated started offering data services over the powerlines.


The key to bridging transformers is that a lot of power companies had already strung fibre-optic cable throughout their power-grid... basically... the holy-grail of home-broadband: "Fibre to the curb".


They bridge the fibre backbone over the transformer directly into your home wiring. Very cool stuff.



This was over 3 years ago... so I'm sure there are other local electric companies that are doing the same now.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
32,174 Posts
The whole magic of this stuff is that they can get around issues like the transformer stuff and such and make it work.


This idea has been around for more than a decade and has always failed.


The latest demos suggest that the technical hurdles are -- at last -- beginning to be crossed.


There is no point in doing anything other than cheering these people on. More competition = a good thing in this case.


Mark
 
1 - 11 of 11 Posts
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top