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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
First of all, I love the forum and I’m glad there’s a place for people to get information other than from sales people and manufacturers. Sometimes I think they’d like us to be as ignorant as possible (and they succeed with me, that’s for sure).

I’m interested in purchasing a projector for HT use in a dedicated room that is 17’ X 16’. Throw would be against the shorter wall at around 15’ due to WAF reasons. I’ve been contemplating the Hitachi CP-SX5500W for about 2 months now and am wondering if anyone can suggest a better solution. I’m steering away from DLP and CRT for various reasons. I would do LCD and -am leaning toward LCOS. Here’s my question:


I’m primarily concerned with screendoor so the higher the resolution, the better. The SX5500 is the only SXGA I can find at less than $6K (street). The price drops several thousand when I look at XGA PJ’s and I could get a unit that is actually made for HT, unlike the 5500, for much less (I don’t know that a made-for-HT projector is that big of a deal to me but I would definitely need component input – comments on difference?). So, watching primarily DVD’s at SXGA or XGA in 4:3-letterboxed from 15’ or so on a 100†diagonal screen is what I’m facing. I understand that the resolution of DVD material is much less than either SXGA or XGA but is screendoor that different? If not, then I have a LOT more research to do because there are so many XGA choices. If screendoor is significantly worse with XGA, are there any other choices for SXGA below 6 grand?


Second question – I read a good review on the Harmon Kardon DVD 50 in Sound & Vision (06/02). Anyone know of a comparable player (5-disc, DVD, progressive, CD-ROM, MP3, $650 MSRP) that is ALSO DVD-A/SACD compatible?


Last question – and this should be trivial with so many smart folks out there. I have a rudimentary understanding of light and color and this is like a kid asking “why is the sky blue…†If primary colors can be used in combination to create any color, why aren’t CRT’s, LCD’s, and, color wheels - red, blue and yellow – instead of green? If green is blue and yellow mixed together, why is blue essentially used twice and how do you get yellow at all? Or am I confusing light with paint…? Thanks to everyone for the support and ideas.
 

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Quote:
Originally posted by gaf12


If screendoor is significantly worse with XGA, are there any other choices for SXGA below 6 grand?
I can answer only question for you as I am just like you with very little color knowledge. The screendoor effect in LCOS technology is just about none. Yes, you can see it only if you go to within 3 feet of the screen. On all the LCD projectors, including Sanyo XP21 (has MLA) you will be able to see the screen door effect upto about twice the screen width or beyond. You can defocu the image slightly to decrease the screen door effect.


I have Hitachi 5500 and am very happy with it. I would suggect, if possible, take a look at a few projectors which you think will fit in your budget and then make a decision.


DP
 

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Okay, a basic primer in colour theory. You have to distinguish between ADDITIVE PRIMARY colours and SUBTRACTIVE PRIMARY colours. The primary colours of light are RED, BLUE & GREEN. They're called additive because as you add colour, the result becomes more white. R+G+B=White.


The primary colours of pigment - the stuff you paint on paper - are CYAN, YELLOW & MAGENTA (commonly known as blue, yellow & red). They're called SUBTRACTIVE because in order to get a whiter effect you have to subtract the amount of colour (on the paper). C+Y+M=Black (sort of - in practice it's usually a dark, muddy brown).


Hope this clarifies the matter for you.
 

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Hi gaf,


You asked a bunch of questions in there. It looks like the thing to do in this thread is to pick a question out of your post and answer just that one.


Here's mine...

Quote:
If screendoor is significantly worse with XGA, are there any other choices for SXGA below 6 grand?
There is actually quite a bit in that small question! First, a few clarifiers...
  • Screen door won't necessarily be worse with XGA than SXGA. The resolution of the projector doesn't determine the amount of screen door, as the screen door is a result of the technology used to create the image.
  • However, pixel "blockiness" that may come from lower resolution projectors may look like something that you might call screen door, but is in fact completely different.
  • Also, in practice (i.e. the way the real world is), many of the SXGA high resolution projectors happen to have low screen door because they are LCOS projectors. That is coindidental and not causal, but the correlation is still there. Yes, SXGA does often has less screen door than XGA, but it's not really directly due to the resolution


To address part II of your question, yes, SXGA can be found for under $6K. You can find that resolution in a new projector - The Hitachi CP-SX5500, or in the used market - JVC G1000 or JVC G11 (or clones).


I hope that helps!


- Mark Hunter
 

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Quote:
Originally posted by gaf12



why is blue essentially used twice and how do you get yellow at all? Or am I confusing light with paint…? Thanks to everyone for the support and ideas.

Gaf


While Barryz did a superb job of explaining color theory, took the course myself in college, he did leave out the issue of an RGB device producing yellow. In an additive system if you take red and green you get yellow. If you have photoshop you can see this first hand by taking a pure red (r=255 g=0 b=0) and a pure green (r=0 g=255 b=0) and adding them to equal a pure yellow (r=255 g=255 b=0). As you can see in an additive system blue is not used to produce yellow at all.



Chris
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks for all of the responses. Each has helped.


DP,

Thanks for the info. 3 feet from the screen is reasonable. De-focusing to avoid screendoor from further out is not. I think the 5500 is my machine.


Barryz,

You’re post made a lot of sense. I was a little mixed up and couldn’t wrap my mind around it until you answered. Thanks.


Milori,

You answered the question that I’m most concerned with. And you’re right, during my first post, I got so excited, I machine-gunned you guys with questions. I’ll try to put them in their correct forums from now on and limit to 2 per post. Your explanation of screendoor makes sense as well and reiterates the fact that there’s a ton of variables to consider. Because, ideally, I’d prefer zero screendoor to QXGA resolution – I should be positive of what makes a machine more preferable. Back to the books (or the forum, anyway).


Cmont,

I didn’t think Barryz’s post could be clearer, but you were able to let me actually see what he was talking about with your example.


To summarize:

1. I posted to many questions at once. I’ll work on that.

2. My important questions were addressed.

3. I feel a lot better.

4. You guys are great.


I’ll post again soon with more kooky questions. Stay tuned and thanks for being there.
 

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quote "On all the LCD projectors, including Sanyo XP21 (has MLA) you will be able to see the screen door effect upto about twice the screen width or beyond. "


Just for the record the Sony W400Q is an LCD and doesn't have screendoor problems unless you sit insanely close to the screen. Of course thats due to the unusual pixel arrangement that is no longer used.


"The principal factor that reduces the typical "screen-door" look on this projector is actually the structure of the unique panel(s) itself. The pixels are arranged in a delta-pattern Vs stripe configuration. This, combined with the size, quantity, and aperture of the pixels results in a barely discernable pixel structure. The Fly-eye lenses contribute to the good uniformity of the W400 by evenly distributing the light from the lamp." With the built-in line doubler and "fly-eye" lens integrators, horizontal scan lines and pixel structure problems are a thing of the past."


Just a little bit of projector history :)


PS Yes thats the projector I own :)


Regards
 

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Luis:


Odd you should mention the 400Q in this thread. I owned two of them and sold the last one two years ago, hoping that the VW10 would be better than it was. I have seen eleven front projectors in my home since then (10 digital, 1 CRT) and they've all gone back. Most of them were superior to the 400Q in contrast or other specifics, but not one gave me the sheer pleasure in viewing I got from the old Sony. And that picture--with the delta pixels--seemed sharper than most of the XGA projectors I have seen since. If the 400Q had had a better contrast ratio, and decent shadow detail, I'd still have it and be quite pleased.


To stay relevant to the thread, I have also considered the Hitachi, because it reminds me of the Sony in that screen door is irrelevant, there are no DLP artifacts, and the overall viewing experience should be very smooth and relaxing.


Mike
 
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