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Originally Posted by claf-43 /forum/post/0


Didnt some lady die as a result of this competition? Thats what I read via another forum

28 year old mother of three. Is it not commonly known one can die from too much water? Unbelievable!!! I would say the radio station is in for a lawsuit for allowing this in the first place.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Doctor Krypton /forum/post/0

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-JLNrIu7kx4


One of the more truly bizarre stories of the next gen.

Probably not as relevant to gaming so close if you like but it's definitely worth seeing.

I can't believe no one at the radio station and none of the contestants knew about water intoxication. I can smell a major lawsuit in the works.
 

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So this should've been a Gatorade contest?
 

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this is really sad...


Too much water is indeed dangerous and can kill you. Too much water can cause such an electrolyte imbalance in your body, particularly your sodium level. Free water will drop your sodium to dangerously low levels (hyponatremia), which is what probably happened to this poor girl. I'm surprised nobody in that radio staion knew about that.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·

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Originally Posted by FACP /forum/post/0


this is really sad...


Too much water is indeed dangerous and can kill you. Too much water can cause such an electrolyte imbalance in your body, particularly your sodium level. Free water will drop your sodium to dangerously low levels (hyponatremia), which is what probably happened to this poor girl. I'm surprised nobody in that radio staion knew about that.

For me it was an immediate red flag. Drinking as much as you can without going to the bathroom. Not good.
 

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I was hearing on a local talk show that they had signed waivers before engaging in the contest. But in this case, the waivers won't hold up.


I researched waivers last year and found out what they can and cannot do. A waiver or release of liability is simply a legal document where you sign away your right to sue if you get injured. An example would be a waiver for participating in some sort of sporting event. A waiver should list the the types of hazards involved in the activity to be conducted. They also usually contain a clause which says "I realize that participating in this activity could result in serious injury or even death."


The reason this waiver won't hold up is because waivers protect people from accidents due to either freak events or simple negligence. Gross negligence, while it may be on a waiver, is never upheld by courts. So, for example, if you're playing football and break a leg during a tackle, that is covered by the waiver. It was just one of those things that can happen while playing football.


Now let's say you go out to a park and they mark out a field on their own and somebody busts a kneecap on a sprinkler head which was in the area. That could be considered simple negligence because the organizers didn't check the field ahead of time. A bonehead mistake, really. That is covered by waivers.


Now, let's say they set up a football field at the grand canyon so that one of the sidelines is right on the edge of a cliff. If somebody falls off, that's gross negligence because the hazard was obvious.


In the case of "Hold your Wee for a Wii", the question the prosecuting attorney will have to answer is "Was this simple or gross negligence". The defense will argue that people in general don't realize that drinking too much water can result in death. The prosecution will argue that the radio station was grossly negligent in not doing their homework as to the side effects of abnormally large water intake.


As a sidenote, the extent to which a waiver will hold up in court depends greatly on the state the waiver was written in. Some state do uphold waivers even up to cases of simple negligence. Other states do not uphold waivers because they consider waivers to be "against the public interest." Also note that while parents sign waivers for minors all the time, waivers signed for people under 18 are never upheld because neither minors nor their legal guardians are able to waive any rights of minors.


This reminds me of another news story I heard a coupe years ago. The prize was a year's supply of Vodka, or something to that effect. The contest was to see who could drink the most Vodka. Let's just say that they didn't have to worry about how much vodka the winner would drink after the contest was over.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by DanLW /forum/post/0


Now, let's say they set up a football field at the grand canyon so that one of the sidelines is right on the edge of a cliff. If somebody falls off, that's gross negligence because the hazard was obvious.

lol I know that shouldn't be funny, but picturing that made me laugh.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
I can't agree with that really though. It's the people at the radio station who are partially at fault and the participants for not having common sense.

The name doesn't matter.

If there was a contest called "roll down a hill in a box for an Xbox" would you blame the name?
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Doctor Krypton /forum/post/0


I can't agree with that really though. It's the people at the radio station who are partially at fault and the participants for not having common sense.

The name doesn't matter.

If there was a contest called "roll down a hill in a box for an Xbox" would you blame the name?

Oh I wasn't blaming Nintendo in any way, that'd just be stupid. Just a tragic twist of fate.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Slacker George /forum/post/0


It's strange to think how a simple choice about something as frivolous as the name of a videogame console could lead to something so tragic. If it had been named anything but the Wii that woman would be alive today.

It's amazing how small the difference between life and death can be sometimes. Split seconds make the difference between a routine drive home and a fatal accident every day. The decision to go out and get some milk from the store. To take this path instead of that. To walk into a Stop 'n Rob as it's being held up. Should we go rafting today? What's the thunderstorm forecast look like? Take the red pill or take the blue pill?


Sometimes it's hard to know which decisions are life and death.


But in the case of drinking massive amounts of water, it would be pretty clear to me. But I've been through basic military training. They warned us about that sort of thing to get us to have a steady intake of water throughout the day, not all at once.
 
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