AVS Forum banner
Status
Not open for further replies.
1 - 11 of 11 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
12 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Let me start out by saying that I am a networking newbie...


My situation. I have a home LAN consisting of 2 Windows computers and 2 RTV 4500s connecting to the internet over a DSL router. My ISP has assigned 4 static IP addresses which I have in turn assigned to each of the above mentioned devices. I am planning on adding at least another RTV to my LAN. After contacting my ISP, they say I would have to upgrade my service to get more IP addresses and thereby doubling my monthly costs.


Is there a simpler (and obviously cheaper) way to accomplish this?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,546 Posts
yes - buy a cable/dsl router...allows you to share you internet connection with multiple devices


you only need 1 external ip address...this router will then assign internal ip addresses to all your devices


the most widely used is the linksys... this one would probably work nicely for you...you should be able to find this for around $100


if you want wireless you could get the 4-port linksys router...also around $100...then you would have to add a switch if you wanted all 5 items to be hardwired (switch around $35)


do a search on the word 'router' and you'll get lots of hits

www.practicallynetworked.com is a good site for networking info
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
742 Posts
Find a router that is a DHCP server (say a linksys) that serves local IP addresses on your Lan. Then you only need ONE IP address from your ISP for that router / modem and it does NOT have to be static, unless you need it or it doesn't cost any more.


The way it works is simple. Your ISP thinks your router is your PC and only talks thru that. The inbuilt DHCP server provides each real PC with an IP address which is local to your internal LAN only, say 192.168.1.xxx Each PC is given a different unique address. The router deals with pretending to your ISP that you only have one "PC" and makes sure all of the I/O requests from your other local PC's are routed correctly for email, web pages etc.,


I'd then hard code each of your 4500's to be a fixed local IP address, say 192.168.1.98 and 192.168.1.197. Then you don't have to worry about setting anything else on the router to stop it's DHCP server giving another PC that same local address. (Unless you get close to having 197 local PC's :) )....


make sense ? I only know it works for me..... I'm on Bellsouth DSL and use a Linksys BEFSR41. Very easy to configure, even when your ready to share your devices over the internet with port forwarding (later)....
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
lizard_boy thanks for the fast reply. Is the Linksys router to replace the ISP supplied router or connect to it?


I did not mention that I already have a Linksys hub connected to the ISP's router, if this has any effect on situation.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,546 Posts
unless you're on a very tight budget i would ditch the linksys hub


if you don't care about wireless i would just grab the linksys 8-port cable/dsl router...if you've already got all your stuff hardwired (ie cat-5 running to all devices) you're miles ahead of most people


the router will replace your hub and share the connection between all your devices...you may even be able to reduce your monthly bill since you won't need 4 static ip's any more (you'll only need 1)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Sounds like the router is the best bet. The money is not the issue as much as my not wanting to be held captive to my ISP. I do prefer "static" IP addresses for my RTVs, which it sounds like I can accomplish with the Linksys router.


I plan on adding the new Onkyo TX-NR900 A/V receiver and NC-500 to the LAN as well. They have an ethernet port and new feature to play MP3s stored on your network computer. I probably could put the hub in the A/V closet with the planned RTV 5000. I wired the house is with CAT5 with a new renovation project.


Does all this make good sense to you guys?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,584 Posts
Quote:
Originally posted by inspiteofitall
Sounds like the router is the best bet. The money is not the issue as much as my not wanting to be held captive to my ISP. I do prefer "static" IP addresses for my RTVs, which it sounds like I can accomplish with the Linksys router.


I plan on adding the new Onkyo TX-NR900 A/V receiver and NC-500 to the LAN as well. They have an ethernet port and new feature to play MP3s stored on your network computer. I probably could put the hub in the A/V closet with the planned RTV 5000. I wired the house is with CAT5 with a new renovation project.


Does all this make good sense to you guys?
Yes, that all makes sense. You don't need the 4 ip addresses you already have -- if you can lower your monthly cost by going down to one ip address, go ahead and do that.


Internally, a lot of us prefer assigning static ips to our pcs and rptvs. So, we just turn off the dhcp function in the linksys router and we keep track of which device we have assigned which address. Routers are fantastic - you will not notice any diminution of speed copmpared to a single connection.


I just bought the onkyo nr900 myself (it's still in the box), but not for the mp3 playing function. I use the audiotron for mp3 playing throughout the house (wherever I have a good stereo system), and that is a truly amazing device. I guess I'll play with the onkyo net tunes setup to give it a try, but I suspect that it will be a while before the software is really ready for prime time. (The audiotron is big time wife and kid friendly!)


Good luck.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
32 Posts
One other big advantage of using the router too, is that your PC's and RTVs will be a lot safer from hacker attacks from the Internet since they will not be reachable from the Internet except on the ports that you setup for special access via port forwarding on the router. IF you want to be able to share recorded programs via the Internet, you will need to setup port forwarding for each of your RTV's. The instructions that came with the 45xx series was very good in explaining how to do this. I or others in this forum can help you to setup your port forwarding. Just ask when you need help. If you do not want to share programs from your RTV's then no port forwarding needs to be setup for your RTV's. They will be able to "phone home (SB)" as they have always done. - SloPoke
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Thanks all for the great info. I will get the Linksys router.


SloPoke, your reply made me wonder how complicated it is to program or setup the router. I assume it comes with software to do it from the computer side?


Alan, my Onkyo TX-NR900 is also still in the box due to renovation not quite being complete in the media room. I did not get this receiver only for the MP3 Netune feature but also cause of the specs and the ability of putting it on my LAN. I suspect that once its on the network then somebody out there (probably in this forum) will figure out new fun things to do with it. Out of curiousity, what made you get the NR900?


John
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
32 Posts
Quote:
Originally posted by inspiteofitall
Thanks all for the great info. I will get the Linksys router.


SloPoke, your reply made me wonder how complicated it is to program or setup the router. I assume it comes with software to do it from the computer side?


John
It is all done using your web browser. The router comes with a big foldout colorful "Getting Started" guide that will show you how to connect the cables and how to configure the few things that you must do to get it setup. The help screens built into the router (accessed via the web browser) are helpful when you want to add functionality later. In all it should take you less than 20 minutes to setup. The Linksys web site has several guides in pdf format that you can download to look at ahead of time if you like. - David
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,546 Posts
Quote:
Originally posted by inspiteofitall
Thanks all for the great info. I will get the Linksys router.


SloPoke, your reply made me wonder how complicated it is to program or setup the router. I assume it comes with software to do it from the computer side?


Alan, my Onkyo TX-NR900 is also still in the box due to renovation not quite being complete in the media room. I did not get this receiver only for the MP3 Netune feature but also cause of the specs and the ability of putting it on my LAN. I suspect that once its on the network then somebody out there (probably in this forum) will figure out new fun things to do with it. Out of curiousity, what made you get the NR900?


John
no software needed - all you do is point your browser to an address (for the linksys http://192.168.1.1 ) that opens up a web page generated by the router where you can configure everything


since linksys is the most widely used it's easy to find help online if you need it...you should search for a thread by nyclawyer where he/she explains exactly how to configure the router to send/receive shows


if you currenly have to use software to connect to the dsl service (PPPoE) the router can take care of this also
 
1 - 11 of 11 Posts
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top