AVS Forum banner
1 - 20 of 26 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,276 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a DSL modem feeding a 4 port Router with an 8 port switch connected to the router.


I run my 4 HTPC computers on the 8 port switch since these machines are capable of GB speed (however I also have my 3 Directv units and stand-alone BD player on it) and the 4 port router has my two desktop compters and printer on it.


This weekend I was trying to install VoIP device (Obihai 110) and got onto a mess.


My question is this - since my DSL modem assigns IP addresses, should I turn off DHCP function on the router and switch? Currently all the devices are setup at defaults so I guess each device is assigning DHCP. This worked okay but now with the Obi device added to the mix, I'm having problems.


Also, I'm buying a 24 port switch to replace the 8 port. http://www.newegg.com/Product/Produc...82E16833218006

I will move everything onto the the 24 (should make setup/managment easier and clean up my cabling mess). Do I even need the Router anymore? Can I plug just the DSL modem ethernet connection into the Switch (RJ45 port) or does the Router provide some function I need?


Thanks.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,433 Posts
I'm not sure how your DSL provider is setup or what modem you have, but when I had DSL I had to turn off DHCP in the modem. You should probably put the modem into bridged mode and assign the username and password for the DSL in the PPPoE field in your router. The modem should be plugged into the uplink port of the router and the switch connected to any of the other ports.


Your current setup has the two computers bottlenecked by the speed of the a single port on your router. Once you receive the 24 port switch you should remove all devices from the router's switch and connect them all to the 24 port switch.


And yes, with a switch you still need a router. If your modem is able to handle up to 24 DHCP clients then maybe you could ditch the router. However, I'd keep the router since it probably does a better job of routing. Your switch doesn't have a DHCP function so there would be nothing to disable there. Without knowing the exact model of your modem, router, and your DSL provider it is hard to say exactly what the best solution would be. It is typically as I described... modem -> router -> switch -> devices.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,276 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks for the help.

You are correct that my DSL modem is setup in the Bridge mode. It is a Westell (ProLine) provided by Bellsouth. It has one Ethernet and one USB output. I just use the Ethernet port. The current settigns have DCHP turned on. Maybe it is a mistake. I'll try it turned off. Maybe that is the cause of the problem I'm having hooking up the Obi.


The computers that connect to the Internet regularly are the desktops - so I figured connecting them to the Router would be the best way to access the Internet. The HTPC computers on the Switch (can connect to Internet for Netflix, etc.) but mostly just connect to my movie server.


If I connect all the devices to the new 24-p Switch, and the Switch connects to the Router by a single connection (which then connects to the Modem), am I not creating the same bottle neck "to the Internet" you mentioned in your reply?


Thanks again. This stuff can get confusing quickly.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,433 Posts

Quote:
Originally Posted by CountryBumkin /forum/post/20881053


If I connect all the devices to the new 24-p Switch, and the Switch connects to the Router by a single connection (which then connects to the Modem), am I not creating the same bottle neck "to the Internet" you mentioned in your reply?


Thanks again. This stuff can get confusing quickly.

Sort of, but I doubt you have 100 Mbps DSL so you would never reach the bottleneck. When the switch is connected to the router all that the router needs to do is maintain the routing information such as DHCP and provide access to the WAN.


When you have devices on the router's switch ports and also on the 8 or 24 port switch then you've created a bottleneck between those devices. They can only communicate between the single connection between the switch and the router which I'm assuming is 100 Mbps on your router. With the GigE switch all the devices can communicate between each other at 1 Gbps.

http://www.dslreports.com/faq/13600
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,276 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·

Quote:
Originally Posted by bryansj /forum/post/20881225


Sort of, but I doubt you have 100 Mbps DSL so you would never reach the bottleneck. When the switch is connected to the router all that the router needs to do is maintain the routing information such as DHCP and provide access to the WAN.


When you have devices on the router's switch ports and also on the 8 or 24 port switch then you've created a bottleneck between those devices. They can only communicate between the single connection between the switch and the router which I'm assuming is 100 Mbps on your router. With the GigE switch all the devices can communicate between each other at 1 Gbps.

I understand now. Thanks again.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,904 Posts
No, the DHCP on the modem is a DHCP client, requesting a WAN address from the Internet, it has nothing to do with your LAN addresses. The DHCP on the router is the one responsible for assigning addresses to your LAN devices and should be left as-is. I dunno why are you having problem just plugging in a new device?


The VOIP device may require special configuration/connection, read manual.


Oh BTW, it's absolutely recommended, if using a VOIP device, that your switch has QOS feature.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
972 Posts

Quote:
Originally Posted by CountryBumkin /forum/post/20880735


I have a DSL modem feeding a 4 port Router with an 8 port switch connected to the router.


I run my 4 HTPC computers on the 8 port switch since these machines are capable of GB speed (however I also have my 3 Directv units and stand-alone BD player on it) and the 4 port router has my two desktop compters and printer on it.


This weekend I was trying to install VoIP device (Obihai 110) and got onto a mess.


My question is this - since my DSL modem assigns IP addresses, should I turn off DHCP function on the router and switch? Currently all the devices are setup at defaults so I guess each device is assigning DHCP. This worked okay but now with the Obi device added to the mix, I'm having problems.


Also, I'm buying a 24 port switch to replace the 8 port. http://www.newegg.com/Product/Produc...82E16833218006

I will move everything onto the the 24 (should make setup/managment easier and clean up my cabling mess). Do I even need the Router anymore? Can I plug just the DSL modem ethernet connection into the Switch (RJ45 port) or does the Router provide some function I need?


Thanks.

I have a setup similar to yours, including a OBI (model 100) but I use a cable modem in lieu of DSL. You definitely don't want two DHCP servers running simultaneously that assign IP addresses to your network hosts. Personally I'd run the DHCP server from the device you find easiest to access and manage over your network. In my case I use my 4-port router/switch as the DHCP server because I access it from time to time to monitor and manage several network items (remote access attempts, wifi access, traffic in/out, etc.). Thus, everything I need to review is accessible from one device.


Like you I quickly ran out of switch ports on the router so I added a 5-port switch for various AV devices in my living room. In theory your OBI should work off your 8-port switch (if I understood your description correctly a cascaded switch running off your router) but in the interest of call quality and reliability I'd recommend connecting the OBI to your router if a switch port is available. Put another way, get the OBI as close to your modem as possible from a network topology perspective. I did this (at the expense of a link to a bedroom I had to move to my 5-port cascaded switch-fortunately without adverse effect) and the OBI works well.


Also like you, when I move to a more permanent home within a year or so, I'm going to buy a larger, manageable "core" switch that every host will connect to without having to cascade through 2 or 3 switches for some hosts like I'm doing now. The good news is that everything works, it's just a bad design practice.


I almost like my OBI+Google Voice a lot. I may have found a fix for the dreaded voice recording bug and if it works I'm going to love it. If nothing else we can't argue about the price
. I just applied the fix last night so I'll know soon enough.


Good luck with your OBI and DHCP configuration.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,433 Posts

Quote:
Originally Posted by elockett /forum/post/20881531


I almost like my OBI+Google Voice a lot. I may have found a fix for the dreaded voice recording bug and if it works I'm going to love it. If nothing else we can't argue about the price
. I just applied the fix last night so I'll know soon enough.


Good luck with your OBI and DHCP configuration.

Let me know what that fix is if it works. However, I haven't had it pop up in months.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,652 Posts
You do not want to turn off your router's DHCP. That drastically complicates your setup as you'd have to set static IPs for every device.


Your issue with the VOIP is it may need to have TCP/UDP ports forwarded - checking the OBI forum and searching 'port forward' or googling would let you know if it needs to. If you do need to port forward, then the OBI needs a static IP. But you can accomplish this with your router's DHCP. Under the DHCP settings on your router will be a section for reserving IP by MAC address. Enter the MAC address of the OBI (when the OBI is on and has an IP look at the connected devices on your router status page and it will tell you the MAC address) and enter an IP that is within the range of your DHCP. Every time that MAC address requests an IP the DHCP will always give it the same IP and will never give it to another device.


As said, you also need to activate QoS on your router for best VOIP performance. The easiest way would be by MAC Address. You'd add a new rule that states all traffic from VOIP MAC address has highest priority. This will tell the router to always give the VOIP device first priority in internet traffic so file downloads or streaming videos won't degrade your VOIP performance. I do this with my Sprint Airave (cellphone VOIP) and when I'm maxing out my internet bandwidth with a download my cellphones still work without issue.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
972 Posts

Quote:
Originally Posted by jrwalte /forum/post/20881788


You do not want to turn off your router's DHCP. That drastically complicates your setup as you'd have to set static IPs for every device.


Your issue with the VOIP is it may need to have TCP/UDP ports forwarded - checking the OBI forum and searching 'port forward' or googling would let you know if it needs to. If you do need to port forward, then the OBI needs a static IP. But you can accomplish this with your router's DHCP. Under the DHCP settings on your router will be a section for reserving IP by MAC address. Enter the MAC address of the OBI (when the OBI is on and has an IP look at the connected devices on your router status page and it will tell you the MAC address) and enter an IP that is within the range of your DHCP. Every time that MAC address requests an IP the DHCP will always give it the same IP and will never give it to another device.


As said, you also need to activate QoS on your router for best VOIP performance. The easiest way would be by MAC Address. You'd add a new rule that states all traffic from VOIP MAC address has highest priority. This will tell the router to always give the VOIP device first priority in internet traffic so file downloads or streaming videos won't degrade your VOIP performance. I do this with my Sprint Airave (cellphone VOIP) and when I'm maxing out my internet bandwidth with a download my cellphones still work without issue.

Good advice and it's been several months since I initially setup and configured my OBI but I don't think port forwarding is required. Regardless, I'd recommend assigning the OBI a static IP for improved reliability and accessibility (if for no other reason than occasional firmware updates). My OBI is bookmarked in my browser so its one click to its web UI for management.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,276 Posts
Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Thanks to everyone for trying to expalin this.


DHCP on the Router is enabled. I did disable the DCHP on the Westell DSL modem and so far I don't notice any difference. I don't think this was the client DHCP for the WAN because I went into "Home Network" tab to disable it and it says "LAN DHCP Server enable" (which I unchecked). I guess the client DCHP setting is under the "Braodband DSL Line" tab.


There is a box called DNS relay. It says

"Uncheck the box to transfer the DNS server information from your ISP to your computers. If checked, your computers will use the router for a DNS server".


I didn't notice whether this was checked or unchecked - is there preference?


** jrwalte, the problem I ran into setting up the OBi, happened like this; first everything worked properly. I was able to make a call (using another phone to my Google Voice number, and the phone rang). I did not log out of Google Voice (but I logged out of Google Chat) and everthing looked okay. A couple of hours later I came back and the Google Voice phone would not work. the green light on the Obi was indicating that it is "looking for a DHCP IP address". I tried sending the **5 xxxx comand again but it could not connect.

That is when I got stuck and started screwing around in the Router settings.


I think your instructions will help alot. I'm going to try them out now.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,652 Posts
'LAN DHCP server' on your DSL modem should be disabled. LAN indicates it is internal and not with Bellsouth's network and it was (at least attempting) to give IP addresses to each device connected to the modem. Uncheck the DNS relay. This will pass the DNS IPs of Bellsouth to your router which will manage DNS for you.


Verify if your router is setup as DHCP for your LAN, though. It's possible when your network was originally setup that the DSL modem was the DHCP and the router was not - which means a router wasn't even necessary. A DSL modem has a limit on the number of IPs it will give out. Usually 4-5 IPs. Your issue may be you are hitting that max and so, depending on how many devices you have on at once, you are running out of IPs that your DSL modem will provide. But if you have the modem connected to the router's internet port, this wouldn't be happening. The modem would only see 1 device (the router) and the router would be providing the IPs for the devices behind it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,276 Posts
Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Okay, I setup everything as described herein, and the Obi device is working!.

I setup the Router to provide the same IP address to the Obi all the time. I could not assign it an address outside of the DHCP range as suggested above, but I did give it the highest IP address in the listing so it should not ever be a problem. I will also setup a rule to give VoIP highest priority as recommended.


I'll wait a few days to make sure all is good - then I'll call bellouth (now AT&T) and discontinue the local and long distance service.


Yee-haw! I love saving money - without giving up anything.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,433 Posts

Quote:
Originally Posted by CountryBumkin /forum/post/20882063


Okay, I setup everything as described herein, and the Obi device is working!.

I setup the Router to provide the same IP address to the Obi all the time. I could not assign it an address outside of the DHCP range as suggested above, but I did give it the highest IP address in the listing so it should not ever be a problem. I will also setup a rule to give VoIP highest priority as recommended.


I'll wait a few days to make sure all is good - then I'll call bellouth (now AT&T) and discontinue the local and long distance service.


Yee-haw! I love saving money - without giving up anything.

I did the same, but also threatened to cancel my DSL if I couldn't get a better deal with them. They offered me 6 Mbps DSL for $20/month for 12 months. But after three months the deal never showed up. I canceled and got a cable modem and last week canceled my DirecTV and got Comcast TV with a Ceton tuner. The Obi has been great and it is pretty much set it and forget it. I just update its firmware every couple months when I think about it.


What router to you have? Does it have Tomato or DD-WRT?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,276 Posts
Discussion Starter · #16 ·

Quote:
Originally Posted by bryansj /forum/post/20882514


The Obi has been great and it is pretty much set it and forget it. I just update its firmware every couple months when I think about it.


What router to you have? Does it have Tomato or DD-WRT?

I have the D-Link DIR130. I have not investigated whether or not I can run Tomato firmware. I saw a few threads on it at the Obi forum but didn't really look into much. I believe Tomato is an alternate firmware/program (if that is the right term) that I load on my router instead of the firmware provided by D-Link. Is that correct? I have not seen the term "DD-WRT" before.

What benefit does it provide?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
24 Posts

Quote:
Originally Posted by CountryBumkin /forum/post/20883750


I have the D-Link DIR130. I have not investigated whether or not I can run Tomato firmware. I saw a few threads on it at the Obi forum but didn't really look into much. I believe Tomato is an alternate firmware/program (if that is the right term) that I load on my router instead of the firmware provided by D-Link. Is that correct? I have not seen the term "DD-WRT" before.

What benefit does it provide?

Hey Country,

DDWRT is basically the same as Tomato, a new program interface for your router. It provides better menus (in my opinion), more control over QoS, usage monitoring capabilities, and wireless bridging capabilities (if your router has a transceiver).


DDWRT is a bit better supported then Tomato with its own forum and several developers/programmers.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,433 Posts

Quote:
Originally Posted by lhwidget /forum/post/20883916


Hey Country,

DDWRT is basically the same as Tomato, a new program interface for your router. It provides better menus (in my opinion), more control over QoS, usage monitoring capabilities, and wireless bridging capabilities (if your router has a transceiver).


DDWRT is a bit better supported then Tomato with its own forum and several developers/programmers.

BUT, the D-Link DIR130 isn't supported.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,321 Posts
I just emailed d-link support about setting up internet radio on my pioneer vsx-31 AVR. They emailed me back on the second day with instructions for setting up a static port. I have not followed the instructions yet, they just came.


Until last week I had never heard of DHCP and static ports and I am still trying to figure it all out. I did bumble around and get internet radio to work via DHCP which win 7 decided to set up for me.


This post is just to let you know you should give D-Link support a try.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,276 Posts
Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Post #9 talks about setting up a static IP address for a device/computer on your LAN. It's pretty easy (in the D-Link). You just select the MAC address for the device (your Pioneer) and select the IP address you want it to have/keep (its all done by selecting the device's MAC and allowable addresses from a drop down box). If all the devices/computers are connected to your LAN before you open the D-Link configuration page, all the devices show up in the drop-down selection boxes. You don't even have to figure out the device's MAC address.


Now if you want a static from your Internet provider, that's another thing. You can pay extra for that (at least with Bellsouth you can).
 
1 - 20 of 26 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top