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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I haven't been able to find a HT Construction for Dummies forum yet so please forgive my stupid questions.


Which items below help sound quality and which ones are strictly for sound deadening(and which ones do both)? I'm not overly concerned with sound proofing due to my theater location. I would like to do the things that improve sound quality. Also, does it do any good to sound channel the walls and not the ceiling? When using sound channel, how do you attach the base molding? I'm picturing the drywall cut an inch and a half short with a furing strip on the bottom plate. Then nailing the trim to the furing strip and letting the trim float against the drywall.


Sound Channel

double drywall

green glue

flooting floor

Insulation

anything else I forgot


Thanks for the help. I'm just getting started and really enjoy reading the posts.

 

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You haven't mentioned any plans for wall treatments. If you go the 1 inch linacoustic route moulding gets fastened to furing strips that are glued,stapled and or screwed to the drywall.


In your scenario with no treatments you could attach the moulding to the drywall with construction adhesive and some mechnical fastners to hold it in place until the glue sets.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I hadn't thought of attaching the trim to the drywall. In Colorado, we have to have floating walls due to expansive soils, so I don't think that would work for me. If the floor comes up it would push the trim up and crack the drywall. I have included a picture of what us lucky Coloradans get to deal with(floating walls). Thanks for the reply, your description makes sense.
 

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In Colorado, if the floor comes up, the drywall will crack anyway. The purpose of the floating walls is not to protect your drywall but to protect the structural integrity of the house and framing in the basement.
 

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Don't despair. I am working on putting together a book that will be titled: Home Theater Construction for Dummies. The only problem I am running into is that the material costs used in creating such a book are higher than the potential royalties earned from it.


Still attempting to figure out which manufacturers are willing to chip in to get such a book created...
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Code requires an inch and a half of space for movement. When you purchase a new home here they tell you the condition of your soil. Mine was a little below moderate so I don't think I'll have lots of movement. Hopefully less than 3/4 of an inch. But you never know. Any one have any answers on my other questions?


Thanks
 

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"I'm picturing the drywall cut an inch and a half short with a furing strip on the bottom plate. Then nailing the trim to the furing strip and letting the trim float against the drywall."


That's essentially correct. We didn't use sound channel on ours but my drywall guys essentially just cut strips of drywall and attached it to the bottom plate. It leaves just the expansion gap. We ended up using a 4 1/2" base and it covered everything nicely. We attached the base moulding to the firring strips and we were pretty much set.
 

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I'm a long-time lurker, first time poster. I've recently moved to the Denver area and will be moving into our Colorado home in about 6 weeks. I intend to build a dedicated home theater in our basement. Our basement isn't a slab though, we have a floating floor over a pier and beam system. There are a set of beams running across the basement (connected to the poured concrete walls, and the piers), with a metal 2x4 framing system, and then a tongue and groove subfloor on type of this. I'm concerned about how to do any sound isolation with this. It seems like a proscenium will help with things like bass absorption, but I'm afraid the entire basement floor will resonate at volume.


Has anyone here dealt with a flooring system like this (in Colorado or otherwise)?


As others have said many times, this forum is chock-full of fantastic information. I read up nearly every day, and enjoy watching everyone's progress logs. I hope to contribute my own soon.


-Ryan
 

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68sting...


You can attach baseboards in a basement in Colorado with floating walls! You need to attach the baseboard to the bottom plate that is attached to the concrete floor. This works best with a nail gun, but if you don't have one, you can add a strip of wood to make the baseboard fluch with the drywall. DO NOT NAIL IT TO THE WALL. What you are essentially doing is allowing the wall to "float" behind the baseboard.

http://img365.imageshack.us/img365/8983/section29eh.jpg


-Sean
 
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