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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am currently building up my hifi and would like some advice on some things.


My system is currently composed of:


Cambridge Audio Azur 540R reciever

Q Acoustics 2000Ci Centre Speaker

2 Acoustic Energy AE120 Floorstanders as front stereo

2 Acoustic Energy Neo Thee V2 Floorstanders as Rears

BK XLS400 Subwoofer for LFE channel and crossed over with the right AE120 (80hz)

REL Q100e subwoofer crossed over with the left AE120 (80hz)


This setup is being used for both music and as a home theatre.


I have problems with the bass response in my room and was looking to purchase a dspeaker antimode 8033c to provide a more linear response for the subwoofers. However at this price point I am considering upgrading my reciever to one with automatic room correction.


Could you suggest what reciever would be best for a budget of about 300-400 pounds? Also do you think the AE neo floorstanders that I own should be used as my main stereo speakers instead of the AE120s?


Also I found that there is a lack of clarity from the AE120 tweeters so i am using 2 Fostex PM04 speakers to compliment these. Is this a problem with my amplification of the speakers or just due to the speaker itself?


Any help is appreciated.


Thanks
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Willyoung351  /t/1468395/home-theatre-setup-querys#post_23206289


I have problems with the bass response in my room

"Room correction" software can address only about one fourth of the problems. It can reduce the level of peaks, but it can't do so uniformly around the room. At some locations it will make bass that was too weak there even weaker. Further, such software can't improve nulls, and it can't reduce ringing, both of which are at least as damaging as peaks. Versus bass traps (acoustic treatment devices) that improve all three problems, and do so for all locations in the room. This short article is mainly about home recording, but all the same principles apply to hi-fi and home theater too:

Acoustic Basics


--Ethan
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks I dont think ive properly considered room treatment before now but I think as you say it would be the best option. I know about bass traps but for acoustic foam tile placement to remove unwanted mid/high reflections where is the best place to put these? if i post a picture of my room would you be able to advise?


Many thanks for your help
 

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Quote:
I have problems with the bass response in my room and was looking to purchase a dspeaker antimode 8033c to provide a more linear response for the subwoofers.

What problems exactly do you have with the bass response? Have you used measuring software to identify the problems?


You didn't describe your room nor the speaker/subwoofer placement within....a drawing of you room, or pics would be very helpful.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Dont worry ive got the acoustics all sorted out. My next venture is i am able to bi amp my speakers but i havent found a definitive answer whether it is actually worth it or not? Using two separate amplifiers ofc
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Willyoung351  /t/1468395/home-theatre-setup-querys#post_23214741


My next venture is i am able to bi amp my speakers but i havent found a definitive answer whether it is actually worth it or not?

Bi-amping is indeed worthwhile. The text below is from my Audio Expert book. This section address home recording studios, but the points made apply equally to hi-fi.


--Ethan

Quote:
Originally Posted by The Audio Expert 

There are many advantages of active monitors for the typical project studio, besides a simpler hookup with fewer pieces to carry if you ever do remote recordings: Active speakers are typically bi-amped, which yields less distortion as already explained. Bi-amping also offers more ways to optimize the crossover performance because it uses active rather than passive components, as was also explained. Further, using an active crossover increases headroom within each band by segregating the bands. That is, if the amplifier that powers the bass range clips at a very loud volume, high frequencies are still reproduced cleanly unless that amplifier is also driven into distortion.


Further, the power amplifiers can be well matched to the speakers, they won’t have a fan, and the wires between each power amp and its speaker are shorter, which might improve damping. (Amplifier damping is explained in Chapter 21.) An active loudspeaker can also contain DSP circuitry to counter frequency response errors in the drivers themselves and to add any needed delays so frequencies near the crossover point emit from both drivers at the same time. This not only improves frequency response, but it can also reduce the radiating directivity problem known as lobing, which will be described shortly. But to me, the overwhelming advantage of powered monitors, as implemented in Mackie speakers anyway, is that the woofer cone’s mechanical motion is included within the power amplifier’s electrical feedback loop. This improves low-frequency response, reduces ringing at the port’s resonant cutoff frequency, counters thermal compression in the voice coil, and reduces driver distortion.
 

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Unless you have woefully underpowered amps or very low sensitivity speakers, bi-amping is a waste of time and money IMO.
 
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