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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am in the mids of designing my new waterfront cottage with ten feet high basement. I will plan to have radiant tube heating throughout all the floors. I am planning to use a big part of the basement with a ceiling mount Barco BG808S crt projector. I only plan to use the new cottage for the three seasons and not heat it in the winter. I was wondering if the liquid cooled tubes or the freeing on the projector could cause permanent damage in the spring when I need to use it?. Is there a way to winterize a crt projector ? all thoughts are welcome


Thanks


Wayne:confused:
 

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If the HT is in the basement than the ground temps of the area will come into play. Simply set the thermostate to 50 degrees F. This should set off any dangers of freezing. The ground temperatures of all but the most artic climates are 55-60 degrees throughout the year, and thus assure low energy expedutures. Consult your local T.V. Weather Man for details. Most are happy to return calls or Emails....


Sean
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
FYI,


The Cottage is two hours north of TO. It gets down to -25 degree C with up to four feet of snow. it will cost too much to heat the place for three months and not being there. plus the propane tank would be run empty way before spring comes. It would be cheaper to take the unit down every year !


Wayne
 

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You may have just answered your own question!


For what it is worth, the liquid in the tubes is glycol based, and should aproach the same properties as the anitfreeze in your car. Call Barco and ask them if they've ever had damage occur due to low temperatures.


Car anitfreeze is Ethelene glycol...


Heat transfer fluid is either that or Propolene glycol, depending on the projector, but 25below seems a bit harsh...



Sean
 

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I suppose you could build a really well insulated hush-box and then seal the vents when you go away for winter. Inside the hush-box you could install an electric heating element like a "Damp-chaser" used for pianos. Damp-chasers are typically controlled by a humidistat, you could simply use a thermostat instead and set it just above freezing. A well insulated hush-box that you seal for the winter would not require a lot of energy to keep at such a low temperature.


p.s. I know that "Damp-chasers" are UL approved etc. but I would check with local codes and make sure the fire insurance is up to date.;)


Richard
 

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I don't see why it would not work. Let the projector warm up to temperature for a good 72 hours before firing it up when you get back to it in the spring.


Buy a cheap projector for a test run. Let us know if it blows up, so others don't do the same thing. (Hey, someone has to be a guinea pig...;-)


Curt
 

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Quote:
Originally posted by jeep lover 2
You may have just answered your own question!


For what it is worth, the liquid in the tubes is glycol based, and should aproach the same properties as the anitfreeze in your car. Call Barco and ask them if they've ever had damage occur due to low temperatures.


Car anitfreeze is Ethelene glycol...


Heat transfer fluid is either that or Propolene glycol, depending on the projector, but 25below seems a bit harsh...
While the liquid in the tubes may be able to withstand the low temperatures, I'm not sure such huge swings in temperature (there's a 40-60C difference between summer & winter up here!) are a good thing to be happening every year to the glycol... you wouldn't want to have to replace the fluid every year or two the way do you in your car.


The small heater solution (Damp-Chaser) is an interesting one - it would take very little heat to keep this thing at a reasonable temperature. You could build a temporary box enclosure if you didn't want to go with a complete hushbox solution and use something simple like a 40W light bulb may be more then enough to keep the small area above freezing. You may want to use a couple of 20W's in case one burns out or something.


Stop by a hardware store and see what they have for stopping pipes freezing in cottages for us that live up in the great white north. I was in Canadian Tire the other day and they had these special (very slightly) heated wires that you wrap around pipes - the whole thing plugs into an outlet. Many had thermostats and weren't very expensive at all. They're meant to be installed in walls and floors so they're probably very safe. You'll just have to make sure that you don't lose power at the cottage though.


Kal
 
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