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Discussion Starter #1
Hey all,
This is my first foray into the amp world so I have a few rookie questions.
I sold my 7 satellite speakers and decided to upgrade and go back to a 2 channel system.
I bought a used NAD C356BEE int amp and a pair of Focal speakers that are on their way.
Right now I have no speakers!
So I currently have a Pioneer receiver which all my other components are hooked up to.
The NAD is just sitting there.
When I get my speakers, can you give me a brief idea of how to hook them up?
I gather that I'm supposed to connect the NAD to my receiver, and hook up the new speakers to the NAD, correct?
This would be for 2 channel music?
I would still select my CD player from my Pioneer? Would the NAD only be for volume?

Thanks all,

Dan
 

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Not sure why you want to use both the Pioneer receiver and the NAD integrated amp. You really only need one or the other (the speakers and other components, such as CD player, BluRay player, etc) can connect to either for 2-channel audio..
 

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I gather that I'm supposed to connect the NAD to my receiver, and hook up the new speakers to the NAD, correct?
This would be for 2 channel music?
I would still select my CD player from my Pioneer? Would the NAD only be for volume?

Thanks all,

Dan
No, an integrated amp is integrated because it has a preamp stage. Same with a receiver. Both of them do the same basic job. The receiver doesn't have a line level output. It is designed to be the last component before the speakers just like your new amp. You will connect your stuff to the new integrated and put the receiver in the storage closet.
 

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No, an integrated amp is integrated because it has a preamp stage. Same with a receiver. Both of them do the same basic job. The receiver doesn't have a line level output. It is designed to be the last component before the speakers just like your new amp. You will connect your stuff to the new integrated and put the receiver in the storage closet.
Not completely correct... I have a Pioneer 1018ah-k and a Pioneer VSX-32, both have line level outputs... I use a NAD C725BEE in my 2-Channel audio setup
 

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Discussion Starter #6
No, an integrated amp is integrated because it has a preamp stage. Same with a receiver. Both of them do the same basic job. The receiver doesn't have a line level output. It is designed to be the last component before the speakers just like your new amp. You will connect your stuff to the new integrated and put the receiver in the storage closet.
Ok, so that's the end of surround sound for me then?
Is there a way of doing this without having 2 seperate systems?
I thought there might be a way to use my receiver for multi channel and the amp for two channel?
If not, that's ok.

Thanks for all the great advice on these boards!


Dan
 

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Just place the NAD near the AVR and use both.

Turn one on for Surround Sound (when you have the speakers for it), turn the other on for 2 channel.

Its only the end for surround sound if you choose not to buy speakers for the AVR.

I wouldn't have bought the integrated amp, my AVR in 2 channel direct is just fine for stereo.
 

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If your Pioneer has preamp outputs for the front left and right channels, connect them to the NAD's auxiliary input. The NAD will then power the front mains and the Pioneer will power all other channels. Set the NAD's volume knob straight up or on any easily repeatable setting that provides sufficient volume when using it with the Pioneer for surround purposes. The Pioneer becomes the control unit for surround-sound programming. The NAD is used alone for stereo sources. Connect digital sources to the Pioneer. Connect stereo analog sources to the NAD.

An alternative is to purchase a quality switchbox designed to connect two stereo power amplifiers to a pair of loudspeakers. You then select which front mains (Pioneer or NAD) you wish to utilize. In this configuration the Pioneer is used alone for surround and the NAD is used alone for stereo analog sources. Connect digital and stereo analog components as described above.

For awhile I used the excellent Niles DPS-1 switchbox, but it's a bit pricey. Here is a link:

https://www.amazon.com/Niles-Black-...F8&qid=1465771757&sr=8-1&keywords=niles+dsp-1
 
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Ok, so that's the end of surround sound for me then?
Is there a way of doing this without having 2 seperate systems?
I thought there might be a way to use my receiver for multi channel and the amp for two channel?
If not, that's ok.

Thanks for all the great advice on these boards!


Dan

You said you were changing to two channel sound. If you have a multi channel system then two channel is included. You simply choose the stereo option on the receiver.
 

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Not completely correct... I have a Pioneer 1018ah-k and a Pioneer VSX-32, both have line level outputs... I use a NAD C725BEE in my 2-Channel audio setup

You have preamp outputs and tape monitor outputs, not line level outputs. What you are doing is not recommended, at least by me, because you are connecting a preamplified signal into another preamplifier. That can degrade sound quality. It certainly can't do any good. Perhaps you can manage it without problems but you would do better to remove the integrated from the signal chain.


My guess is that you think a two channel amp will somehow "filter" the sound to improve sound quality. It just doesn't work that way.
 

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You have preamp outputs and tape monitor outputs, not line level outputs. What you are doing is not recommended, at least by me, because you are connecting a preamplified signal into another preamplifier. That can degrade sound quality. It certainly can't do any good. Perhaps you can manage it without problems but you would do better to remove the integrated from the signal chain.


My guess is that you think a two channel amp will somehow "filter" the sound to improve sound quality. It just doesn't work that way.
Ok, got ya... see what you mean... preamp out levels can vary depending on how high / low you turn the volume, but from my personal experience and from many other posts seen here in the past, a stereo integrated amp is it for 2-Channel audio...

Using an AVR for 2-Channel audio will definitely work, but if you really love your 2-Channel music a stereo integrated is the way to go...
This has been debated time and again...

The OP has the possibility to test this out and decide which sounds better...

All analog sources directly to the NAD for 2-Channel audio, and the front pre-outs on the AVR to the aux input of the NAD for multi-channel stuff... keeping in mind that the two amps will need to be on for multi-channel use...
 

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Ok, got ya... see what you mean... preamp out levels can vary depending on how high / low you turn the volume, but from my personal experience and from many other posts seen here in the past, a stereo integrated amp is it for 2-Channel audio...

Using an AVR for 2-Channel audio will definitely work, but if you really love your 2-Channel music a stereo integrated is the way to go...
This has been debated time and again...

The OP has the possibility to test this out and decide which sounds better...

All analog sources directly to the NAD for 2-Channel audio, and the front pre-outs on the AVR to the aux input of the NAD for multi-channel stuff... keeping in mind that the two amps will need to be on for multi-channel use...
You wouldn't be able to convince me that there would be any improvement in sound quality. If you clip the input of the integrated you will certainly have a reduction in sound quality. I certainly wouldn't do what you did.
 

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I could see myself using my main L-R speakers with an integrated and as part of my (current) 5.1 system, until I get a completely separate 2-channel music listening room.

In my case what I would do is simply connect the Bluesound Vault, turntable, and CD player to the inputs of the integrated via RCA analog or digital, depending upon which unit has the better DAC. Connect the cable TV box, BluRay player and TV to the receiver via HDMI.

My speakers and sub are already connected to the receiver. I would run new speaker wire from the integrated to the back of the speakers, using a different color jacket. Because I have very easy access to the back of those speakers, I could easily switch which speaker wires are connected to the back of the speakers, as banana plugs (even the locking Blue Jeans Cable ones I have) take just a few seconds to swap.

The only fly in the ointment here is the output to the powered subwoofer. I could run the LFE cords from each source to the back of the sub, but I would have to change the settings on the back each time I switched the input because the receiver does bass control that the integrated doesn't.

At the very least, a setup like this using music that doesn't need a sub could be VERY telling about sound quality differences. The BluRay player could play a CD and I could set the receiver to a specific sound level while it plays a particular song. I could then take the same CD and put it in the player attached to the integrated and set the volume level of that same song to be exactly the same. This would tell me if there is any profound difference in sound quality of the receiver versus the integrated amp and I can then decide my next move.

So the OP might try doing a similar experiment to find if there is any real gain.
 

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You have preamp outputs and tape monitor outputs, not line level outputs.
Preamp and tape-monitor outputs are line-level outputs. The former is a variable output adjusted by the volume control and the latter is a fixed-level output. Both are line level.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
You said you were changing to two channel sound. If you have a multi channel system then two channel is included. You simply choose the stereo option on the receiver.
When I decided to upgrade my speakers it was suggested that I upgrade my power to drive them.
I'm not the brightest, but I thought buying an 80W amp would be a good idea, and I understand that they have good resale value.
So here I am with a mismatch of components, but I have a finished basement that has no sounds down there.
I have a few satellite speakers, a reconditioned 20 year old bose speakers, an extra 7.1 receiver, so even if I didn't make the best decisions, I'm still going to have a blast playing with my new toys.

I'm still waiting for my Blue Sound node to come in, and I'll be adding that to my mix.

Thanks again for all your help and advice!

Dan
 

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Snoop, your NAD has "main" inputs - at least according to the pic I saw on the web. What I saw was jumpers from pre-amp out to main in. Pull the jumpers and you can connect the L+R pre-amp output from the Pio to the "main" inputs on the NAD.
 

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Snoop, your NAD has "main" inputs - at least according to the pic I saw on the web. What I saw was jumpers from pre-amp out to main in. Pull the jumpers and you can connect the L+R pre-amp output from the Pio to the "main" inputs on the NAD.
Doing this will not allow you to use the input sources on the NAD...

All analog connections should go directly to the NAD, and the front pre-out of the Pioneer to one of the analog inputs on the NAD otherwise, FWIK, analog input into the AVR will be digitized, run through the DSP chain and converted back into analog...
You can do all the audyssey and room correction as much as you want, the audio is never going to sound as good as going straight from the (analog) source to a stereo integrated...

I am a proponent of using an external DAC if you really need one,

IMO, AVRs are to be avoided at all costs in a 2-Channel audio setup scenario... they simply dump avoidable complexity into the mix... :D
 

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Preamp and tape-monitor outputs are line-level outputs. The former is a variable output adjusted by the volume control and the latter is a fixed-level output. Both are line level.

Nice try. They go through the preamplifier.
 

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When I decided to upgrade my speakers it was suggested that I upgrade my power to drive them.
I'm not the brightest, but I thought buying an 80W amp would be a good idea, and I understand that they have good resale value.
So here I am with a mismatch of components, but I have a finished basement that has no sounds down there.
I have a few satellite speakers, a reconditioned 20 year old bose speakers, an extra 7.1 receiver, so even if I didn't make the best decisions, I'm still going to have a blast playing with my new toys.

I'm still waiting for my Blue Sound node to come in, and I'll be adding that to my mix.

Thanks again for all your help and advice!

Dan

I understand. The incompetent advice about audio on the internet is frustrating but unavoidable. Hopefully you can use amp for another application.
 
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