AVS Forum banner

36461 - 36480 of 37363 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
63,353 Posts
Discussion Starter #36,461
Obituary
Mel Winkler, Actor in 'Devil in a Blue Dress' and 'Doc Hollywood,' Dies at 78
By Mike Barnes, The Hollywood Reporter - Jun. 11, 2020

Mel Winkler, a character actor known for his voiceover work and appearances in such films as Devil in a Blue Dress, Doc Hollywood and Coach Carter, died Thursday. He was 78.

Winkler died peacefully in his sleep of unknown causes at his home in Hollywood, his family announced.

Winkler voiced the levitating guardian mask Aku Aku in Crash Bandicoot video games, Wayne Enterprises businessman Lucius Fox on The WB's The New Batman Adventures and Snow Cone Shop owner Johnny Snowman on Nickelodeon's Oswald.

On Broadway, he appeared in The Great White Hope in 1968, in August Wilson's Joe Turner's Come and Gone in 1988 and in Neil Simon's Proposals in 1997-98.

Born in St. Louis, Winkler served in the U.S. Army and made his onscreen debut in 1969 as Dr. Simon Harris on the NBC daytime soap opera The Doctors.

His résumé also included the films Across 110th Street (1972), Heaven Help Us (1985), Dominick and Eugene (1988), Convicts (1991) and City Hall (1996) and such TV series as The Cosby Show, The Young Riders, Star Trek: Voyager, NYPD Blue and The Shield.

Courtney Benson, a spokeswoman for his family, called Winkler "a consummate professional [who was] always willing to share his knowledge and wisdom on any given subject. His infectious smile and love for family will forever be missed. He was a giant among many."

Survivors include his children, Maury and Mark, and four granddaughters.

https://www.hollywoodreporter.com/news/mel-winkler-actor-devil-a-blue-dress-doc-hollywood-dies-at-78-1298033
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
63,353 Posts
Discussion Starter #36,462 (Edited)
No political comments, please.

TV/Critic's Notes

Sorry, Olivia Benson Is Canceled Too
The Law and Order: SVU protagonist gets lionized as a TV “good cop.” That does real-world damage
By EJ Dickson, Rolling Stone - Jun. 12, 2020

A few days ago, I was scrolling through TikTok and saw one featuring Olivia Benson, the beloved star of Law and Order: SVU played by Mariska Hargitay. The TikTok is captioned “#when I say ACAB,” and the audio is from Fergie’s “Big Girls Don’t Cry.” “I hope you know, I hope you know/That this has nothing to do with you,” the woman in the TikTok lip-syncs, as if pained to even be mentioning Olivia Benson and anti-cop sentiment in the same breath.

On social media, where defunding and abolishing the police has become an omnipresent rallying cry, a similar sentiment also reigns. “The only cop I have any respect for is Olivia Benson,” one tweet reads. “nOt AlL cOpS…you’re right, Olivia Benson from SVU would NEVER,” reads another. Even as fictional cops ranging from The Wire‘s Det. Bunk Moreland to Chase from Paw Patrol come under the microscope, Olivia Benson is in another class altogether. She is the minority, the exemption, the special case. She and she alone, it is generally agreed, is allowed to cloak herself in the mantle of Good Cop.

If there were a patron saint of liberal women, Olivia Benson would be it, to the degree that Taylor Swift (a totem for white femininity if ever there was one) named one of her cats after her. And to a large degree, this makes sense. For 21 seasons, Olivia Benson has served as the quintessential Good Cop, the embodiment of all of the qualities we wish law enforcement figures would have: she’s tough but fair, vulnerable yet steely-eyed, displaying constant compassion for survivors and providing no quarter to abusers. She always fights for and believes victims, a marked contrast to real-life law enforcement officials, whose record on convicting sexual offenders is abysmal. The fact that in real life, Hargitay has used her platform to advocate for eliminating rape kit backlog only adds to the character’s bona fides. Olivia is a social justice warrior in the truest, most non-pejorative sense, a law enforcement officer who isn’t motivated by quotas or high school bully impulses, but an earnest desire to do right by survivors at all times. Only a demon, a sociopath, or the President of the United States would take issue with her. She is, by all standards and measures, awesome.

Among some viewers (particularly survivors of sexual violence), there has always been a tacit understanding that this is pure fantasy, and that’s part of the reason why the show is so popular: It presents an alternative version of reality where the justice system works the way it’s supposed to, and watching that can be healing. Accepting that this is sheer fantasy also allows people to overlook some of the more problematic aspects of the show, such as that most of the victims are young white women, its conflation of sex trafficking with consensual sex work, its rampant transphobia, and the fact that Elliot Stabler, the platonic ideal of an emotionally unbalanced, physically abusive Bad Cop, is played by a man so hot and charismatic it should be illegal.

But not everyone who watches Law and Order: SVU interacts with it on those terms. A not-insignificant number of police officers have credited the show with their deciding to enter law enforcement, and it’s safe to assume that an even larger number of viewers watches the show and believe that police officers like Olivia Benson are fundamentally on the side of the vulnerable and disenfranchised. And this trope has significant real-life implications: according to a report from Color of Change (which features a screen grab from SVU) on the cover), crime series “make heroes out of people who violate our rights” and “do not depict the reality, causes, or consequences of [racial disparities in the criminal justice system] accurately.”

The protests against police brutality have prompted a necessary conversation about the lionization of cops in popular culture, and how such tropes condition us to view police officers as a force for good, even when there is ample real-life evidence to the contrary. Law and Order: SVU show runner Warren Leight himself weighed in on this on a Hollywood Reporter podcast, saying, “People watch the shows to see heroes. You have the responsibility to at least depict the reality — as close to the reality as you can.” And these discussions have culminated in real-life change: At least two reality shows featuring police officers have been canceled following the protests, and LEGO nixed a marketing campaign for its latest police officer toy set. Some producers, like Tom Scharpling of Monk, have even issued mea culpas of sorts, tweeting that those who have worked on series that depict cops as “lovable goofballs…have contributed to the larger acceptance that cops are the implicitly the good guys.”

It is safe to assume that, for some time at least, culture creators are going to be cautious about depicting police officers in a positive light, and that that will result in some much-needed changes being made in writers’ rooms and studio brainstorm sessions across the country.

But Olivia Benson won’t change, not fundamentally, because nobody wants Olivia Benson to change. We’re probably not going to see her making an effort to hire more police officers of color. We’re probably not going to see George Floyd incorporated into plotlines in anything but a cursory, ripped-from-the-headlines way. We’re probably not going to see her being taken to task in front of an internal review board for overseeing a cop roughing up a black male suspect. Such changes run counter to the paradigm that governs the show, which as Leight says, is “how justice should be handled,” even if that is very rarely the reality.

No matter how fraught the role of law enforcement official becomes in the cultural imagination, no matter how embedded she is in a system that perpetuates racism and misogyny and brutality, nobody wants to see Olivia Benson as anything but a hero. We need to believe the system is not totally broken. We need to believe that cops are not totally irredeemable. We need to believe that some cops can be Good because Olivia Benson is Good, even if to hold her up as the exception to the rule perpetuates the #notallcops line of thinking that leads some people to nod their heads when Fox News demonizes the protesters in the first place.

The truth is that, if you agree that the system is broken and great changes need to be made on all levels to fix it, you can’t pick and choose what needs to be changed. No matter how much you love Olivia Benson, you have to be willing to grapple with the fact that she plays a major role in perpetuating the idea that cops are inherently trustworthy and heroic, and that many viewers are unable to distinguish between the gossamer fantasy of how justice should be handled, and how it actually is. If cops are canceled, that means all cops are canceled, up to and including the strong and pretty ones we like to watch break down pedophiles in interrogation rooms. Revolution can’t be built on the backs of the exceptions, and those who perpetuate toxic systems can’t be deemed immune to critique just because we like them. It’s the simplest equation there is: if all cops are bastards, and Olivia Benson is a cop, that means she’s — kind of — a bastard. (Mariska is cool, though.)

https://www.rollingstone.com/culture/culture-features/olivia-benson-svu-mariska-hargitay-canceled-cops-1014181/
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
63,353 Posts
Discussion Starter #36,463
TV/Critic's Notes (Analysis)
Will the demise of police reality TV like 'Cops' and 'Live PD' usher in an era of change?
By Andrea Ball, USA Today - Jun. 12, 2020

The end came fast for police reality show "Live PD.“

Amid national outcry against police brutality in the wake of the Memorial Day death of George Floyd while in the custody of Minneapolis police, it took less than three weeks for A&E to cancel the popular police reality show.

Accusations of exploiting and misrepresenting people of color. Claims that cops on the show played to the cameras instead of doing their jobs properly. Allegations of stonewalling investigators probing the death of Javier Ambler II, a black man who died during a 2019 traffic stop in Austin, Texas, by a Williamson County sheriff's deputy.

On Tuesday, the reality show "Cops" was canceled after more than three decades on the air. The next day, after "Live PD" said it had destroyed footage of Ambler’s death, A&E Network shut down the show.

"Live PD" producers deny withholding evidence and say they have been unfairly vilified.

Dan Abrams, ABC News chief legal correspondent and host of the show, wrote online that he was “frustrated and sad.” He said the show provided law enforcement transparency and a real-life perspective on police work.

"Live PD" fans reacted with apoplexy.

“I am disgusted by you guys for cancelling #livepd and I will NEVER watch A&E again,” one Twitter user wrote.

But critics of the show say Ambler’s death raised serious questions about the effect of reality TV culture on police work and the justice system. Law enforcement leaders who have worked with those programs say the presence of TV crews resulted in more traffic stops to keep the action moving. Others worry it provokes more aggressive policing behavior.

Russ Boles, a Williamson County commissioner who opposed the presence of "Live PD," questions whether Ambler would still be alive had TV cameras not been filming the deputies involved.

“I just don’t know how they couldn’t have been acting more aggressive for the cameras.” Boles said.

Critics of the police reality genre hope that the shows’ demise will contribute to long-term, systemic change in the way officers treat people of color.

“Whatever perceived benefits its fans say the show promotes, I believe they are far outweighed by the divisiveness, bias confirmation and harm it causes in communities where the show is produced,” said Lori Decter Wright, a city councilor in Tulsa, Oklahoma, which recently ended its relationship with the show.

The making of heroes and villains
"Live PD" premiered in 2016. It features segments shot days or hours prior to the show and live broadcasts of police responding to incidents, interspersed with commentary from analysts.

Especially popular among the 50-plus age group, it had about 2 million viewers per episode, according to ShowBuzzDaily.com. The show has a big social media following, including 3.6 million Facebook fans.

And officers in the mostly suburban and rural communities featured have enjoyed celebrity status. Williamson County Sheriff Robert Chody made baseball cards and T-shirts with pictures of local deputies filmed on the show, some of which are currently being sold online.

Derek Allison, a "Live PD" fan from Athens, Georgia, said A&E bowed to pressure.

“It’s obvious that they care only about ratings and backlash,” Allison said. “They could’ve used the show as a platform for dialogue and reform. I’m disappointed.”

But research by Mary Beth Oliver, a professor at Pennsylvania State University who has studied media and race in law enforcement, indicates the show would have been an unlikely platform for change. Years of study shows that many people like the show because they enjoy the basic storytelling concept: a hero, a villain and ultimate justice, she said.

But the show also reveals a darker human desire: to feel superior. “There’s a tendency for people to enjoy the process of comparing themselves to others who are worse off or who are made to look unintelligent or made to look silly,” she said.

And there’s another troubling side to police reality shows, Oliver said. Her research showed that people with racist or authoritarian leanings enjoyed the show more when the suspects were black.

Her 1994 study of "Cops" and similar shows found that police officers “are generally more likely than criminal suspects to be portrayed as using aggressive behaviors” and that blacks and Hispanics were more likely to be the target.

On Abrams' website, lawandcrime.com, he insisted his show was different.

“It’s important to distinguish 'Live PD' from a show like “Cops” that just presented a highlight reel of crazy moments. ‘Live PD’ was totally different – following the officers in real time, in their real environments showing the nerves, the adrenaline, the bad, the good, and often the mundane and boring,” he wrote.

A local fight to keep cameras away
Which brings us to the death of Ambler II, who died during a 2019 traffic stop in Austin, Texas, by a Williamson County sheriff's deputy.

Williamson County sheriff’s office joined the show in 2018. Chody promised county commissioners it would be a boon to recruiting for his small suburban department, saying it “would put a human face on law enforcement.”

Williamson County was not paid by producers to be featured on the show. County commissioners renewed the contract in June 2019 but then canceled it in August amid concerns about the liability of having producers follow the sheriff’s office and that the contract allowed Big Fish Entertainment, which produced the show, to destroy unaired footage within 30 days.

Sheriff Chody renewed the contract anyway, prompting commissioners to sue Chody and Big Fish Entertainment in May.

Chody declined to respond to questions for this story.

Did cameras affect police officers' behavior?
Deputy “JJ” Johnson was attempting to pull over Ambler for failing to dim his headlights, a minor traffic violation that in many departments would not warrant the 22-minute chase that ended in Ambler’s death.

Ambler’s fatal encounter as the TV cameras rolled, though, is not the first incident to provoke questions about how the show affects officers’ behavior.

Williamson County officials have said that deputies with crews riding along patrol major arteries, where there’s a better chance of pulling someone over. Deputies featured on the show are given a specially named patrol unit, so dispatchers won’t send them to nearby incidents if those calls aren’t likely to produce fodder for the show, according to Boles and the commissioners’ lawsuit.

Boles and Williamson County District Attorney Shawn Dick said the behavior of deputies changed when they were being filmed.

County commissioners received a complaint in July that accused deputies of using excessive force on an episode of "Live PD." A deputy wrapped his arms around the neck of 36-year-old Ramsey Mitchell until he passed out, according to the arrest affidavit. Mitchell was charged with assault against a public servant and possession of a controlled substance.

'Live PD' incidents around the nation
Police Chief Darin Powers in Streetsboro, Ohio — whose department worked with the show in 2017 — said his agency conducted more traffic stops when "Live PD" crews were in the car. Otherwise, he said, the camera crews might end up watching officers do paperwork.

In October 2017, he said, officers made more traffic stops than they had in the same month of the previous three years. That month, the department stopped 656 vehicles, compared with 517 in October 2016, 558 in October 2015 and 622 in October 2014.

The Tulsa Police Department pulled out of its contract with “Live PD” in 2017 amid concerns the show exploited people of color.

But Tulsa Mayor G.T. Bynum signed another season-long contract with "Live PD" in September. He told the Tulsa World newspaper that the program would show Tulsans the work of police officers and the footage could be used in training academies.

Marq Lewis, a Tulsa activist, followed "Live PD" crews to document what he saw as the exploitation of vulnerable people. In October, he recorded a scene in which an officer appeared to speak to a "Live PD" camera while, yards away, first responders attempted to resuscitate a woman who had overdosed. After the "Live PD" cameraman panned off him, the officer stepped aside and the cameraman continued to film.

Moments later, officers presented the contents of the woman’s purse for the "Live PD" crew to film.

“These officers wanted to seize the moment for the live TV cameras,” Lewis said.

In the wake of recent protests, Bynum promised he would not renew the contract.

Tulsa Council Member Lori Decter Wright said the show capitalized on people’s worst moments.

“We're a community like any other. We have crime. We have drugs. We have broken families that have domestic violence issues. We don’t need to take advantage of these folks on their worst day,” she said.

Bynum and the police department did not respond to requests for comment.

But Undersheriff Brad Smith, with the Bradford County sheriff’s office, said he saw no noticeable behavior changes while the television cameras accompanied his officers in late 2019 and early 2020. The deputies all wear body cameras and have dash cameras, Smith said, so they are used to being observed.

Streetsboro and Bradford County bowed out of the show because of the added workload and expense of accommodating camera crews.

Behind the destroyed footage of Javier Ambler II
Perhaps the final public blow for "Live PD" — already struggling with its public perception amid protests nationwide expressing anger over police brutality against people of color — was the producers’ admission this week that they had destroyed footage of Ambler’s death.

"Live PD" has a history of withholding and deleting its footage, according to prosecutors and defense attorneys.

Attorney Larry Wilder’s clients were featured on the show a few years ago when they were arrested for minor crimes in Jeffersonville, Ind. Wilder subpoenaed the television show to produce footage from the stops.

Big Fish Entertainment refused to comply. The company sent a letter contending that the subpoena should have been filed in New York and that the video was covered by the New York Shield Law, which protects professional reporters or newscasters from disclosing materials obtained in the course of their work.

Furthermore, the letter concluded, they no longer had any unaired footage. They provided a link to the show on which one of Wilder’s clients had appeared.

Dick, the Williamson County prosecutor, has tried to obtain unaired footage from "Live PD" in at least nine criminal cases, including Mitchell’s, according to copies of letters he sent to Big Fish Entertainment.

He received the same response Wilder did.

Dick warned Chody that he couldn’t prosecute cases in which he did not have all of the evidence.

“I believe "Live PD" footage would help us more than hurt us 99% of the time, but that's if we're not doing anything wrong. Obviously, if you're doing something wrong, you don't want that footage out there, at least the sheriff wouldn't,” Dick said.

Sheriff Chody doesn’t require all his officers to wear body cameras, and Dick said the "Live PD" footage could have provided missing pieces to the investigation.

“Ambler is the perfect example of why we need "Live PD" footage. They would have filmed the entire chase. They would have filmed deputies getting out, running up on Ambler, the whole thing beginning to end,” he said.

"Live PD" has denied that any law enforcement agency asked for its footage, which never aired. A spokesperson said the production company retained the video for three months after the sheriff’s department asked them to preserve it. When Chody’s agency finished its internal investigation, which cleared the involved officers of wrongdoing, and no one else requested the video, the show deleted the footage, per policy.

Additionally, the company points to other footage from officers on the scene —dash camera and body camera video — that is available to investigators.

Dan Abrams responds
On his website, though, Abrams, the host, said that in retrospect, the footage shouldn’t have been deleted.

“I wish the tape had been preserved and the policy should have had an exception for this sort of situation,” he wrote. “Many of us were advocating for a change in the policy before the show was canceled.”

Abrams also said he wishes "Live PD" would have aired its coverage of Ambler's deadly arrest. The company has said it could not due to A&E standards, which is not to air fatalities.

“It would have been very difficult to watch,” he wrote, “but in an ongoing effort to show all sides of policing, I wish this had been aired just as we had shown many other controversial moments that led to criticism of, and appreciation for, police.”

https://www.usatoday.com/story/entertainment/tv/2020/06/12/will-demise-of-police-reality-tv-usher-in-era-of-change/111952698/
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
63,353 Posts
Discussion Starter #36,464
TV/Production Notes (Cable)
‘City On A Hill’ Creator Chuck MacLean Had Reduced Role On Showtime Series After Misconduct Inquiry
By Nellie Andreeva, Deadline.com - Jun. 12, 2020

EXCLUSIVE: Showtime’s Boston crime drama City On a Hill is the brainchild of Ben Affleck and Chuck MacLean. But MacLean, who created the series based on an original idea by Affleck, had his responsibilities on the show scaled back after last year becoming the subject of an internal investigation over alleged misconduct, Deadline has learned.

Following the inquiry, which corroborated one of the claims concerning inappropriate comments, MacLean remained on the series as a writer only for Season 2. He currently has no deal with Showtime, and his future on the show is unclear if it is renewed for a third season.

“During City on a Hill, I focused specifically on supporting anyone who was underrepresented or felt marginalized on set and in the writers’ room. As a result, I was shocked and saddened when I heard that an anonymous individual had made these allegations,” MacLean said in a statement to Deadline. “I cooperated fully with CBS’s investigation and I was pleased when it found that the overwhelming majority of this individual’s claims were unfounded and that I was cleared to continue working on the show. I have always believed in treating all people equally and with respect, and I continue to do so.”

Here is a chronology of the events. After the City On a Hill pilot, written by MacLean in his TV debut, was picked up to series, Showtime brought in seasoned writer-producer Tom Fontana as executive producer/showrunner, with MacLean as a key writer/executive producer.

When production on Season 1 wrapped, an anonymous complaint against MacLean was filed with multiple allegations. It triggered an investigation by the HR department at Showtime’s then-parent CBS Corp.

City On a Hill, starring Kevin Bacon and Aldis Hodge and produced by Showtime, premiered on June 16 2019; by early August, it was renewed for a second season. “With the inspired pairing of Kevin Bacon and Aldis Hodge and the inspired writing of Tom Fontana and Chuck MacLean, we believe there is a rich future for this compelling series,” the network’s entertainment president Gary Levine said at the time.

CBS Corp. revealed the results of its investigation to the parties involved in September. In the letter, a copy of which was obtained by Deadline, then-VP Employee Relations Michael G. Roderick outlined the allegations. According to Roderick, “the complaint was thoroughly investigated by the Company” and “we were able to corroborate that inappropriate comments were made in violation of CBS policy.”

The letter went on to assure “that appropriate action has been taken in response to (the) complaint that we believe achieves this goal and addresses the conduct… At this point, we consider this matter closed.”

According to sources, the action included MacLean getting sensitivity training. Additionally, Showtime reached a decision that MacLean could no longer be on set or in post-production. He did remain a writer on the second season.

MacLean had a two-year deal for City On a Hill, sources said. The scripts for Season 2 have been written, and with that MacLean’s work on the series under his existing contract is over, we have learned. It is unclear when production on the second season will begin as Hollywood studios and unions/guilds still are hashing out safety guidelines. Because of the delay, it is also too early for a Season 3 renewal decision.

A self-described loudmouth, MacLean, who grew up in a blue-collar family in Boston’s Quincy neighborhood, often uses expletives during interviews as he talks about his hell-raising teenage years and brushes with police when he was young. In a story for the Boston Globe published in June 2019, he noted that he had mellowed over the years but shared stories about “trading insults and profane jokes with City producers Tom Fontana and Ben Affleck.”

City on a Hill is set in early 1990s Boston, when the city was rife with violent criminals emboldened by local law enforcement agencies and corruption and racism was the norm, until it suddenly all changed. The drama is a fictional account of what was called the “Boston Miracle,” the campaign that led to a dramatic reduction of the city’s number of youth homicides, told through the eyes of a cynical, corrupt FBI agent (Bacon), and an idealistic Assistant District Attorney (Hodge).

https://deadline.com/2020/06/city-on-a-hill-chuck-maclean-misconduct-investigation-showtime-1202954994/
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
63,353 Posts
Discussion Starter #36,465
TV Notes
On The Air
SATURDAY JUN. 13, 2020 Network Primetime/Late Night Options
(All shows are in HD unless noted; start times are ET. Network late night shows are preceded by late local news)
From Zap2it.com's TV Grid

ABC:
8PM - The Last Dance: Episode 8
(R)
9:01PM - The Last Dance: Episode 9
(R)
10:02PM - The Rookie (58 min.)
(R)

CBS:
8PM - NCIS: New Orleans
(R)
9PM - 48 Hours: Defending DJ
(R)
10PM - 48 Hours: Who Wanted Howard Pilmar Dead?
(R)

NBC:
8PM - Dateline NBC: The Playbook
9PM - Dateline NBC: Facing the Music
(R)
10PM - Saturday Night Live: Madeline Kahn hosts; Carly Simon performs
(R - May 8, 1976)
* * * *
11:29PM - Saturday Night Live: David Harbour hosts; Camila Cabello performs (94 min.)
(R)

FOX:
8PM - Gordon Ramsay's 24 Hours to Hell and Back
(R)
9PM - LEGO Masters
(R)
* * * *
11PM - Ultimate Tag
(R)

PBS:
8PM - Austin City Limits: Vampire Weekend
(R)

UNIVISION:
7PM - Pequeños Gigantes (120 min.)
9PM - Vecinos
9:30PM - Vecinos
10PM - Vecinos
(R)
10:30PM - Vecinos
(R)

TELEMUNDO:
7PM - Movie: Strange Magic (2015)
9PM - Movie: Jack Reacher (2012)

ESPN:
7PM - UFC Fight Night 39: Eye vs. Calvillo - Prelims (120 min., LIVE)
9PM - UFC Fight Night 39: Eye vs. Calvillo (3 hrs., LIVE)

ESPN 2:
7PM - World's Fastest Gamer: The Pressure Mounts (3 hrs.)

NICKELODEON:
8PM - Tyler Perry's Young Dylan
8:30PM - Group Chat With Annie and Jayden

BET:
9PM - BET Her Presents: Queen Collective 2020: Gloves Off (Series Premiere)
9:30PM - BET Her Presents: Queen Collective 2020: Tangled Roots
10PM - BET Her Presents: Queen Collective 2020: Ballet After Dark
10:30PM - BET Her Presents: Queen Collective 2020: If There Is Light

CBSSN:
9PM - PBR Bull Riding, Monster Energy Team Challenge: Las Vegas, NV (2.5 hrs., LIVE)

HALLMARK:
9PM - Movie: Love in the Forecast (2020)

OWN:
9PM - Fear Not With Iyanla Vanzant
10PM - Girlfriends Check In

CNN:
10PM - 1968: A Nation on Edge (Special, 60 min.)

ADULT SWIM:
Midnight - My Hero Academia
(R)
12:30AM - Paranoia Angel
(R)
1AM - Mob Psycho 101
(R)
1:30AM - Black Clover


https://tvlistings.zap2it.com/?aid=gapzap
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
15,973 Posts
TV/Business Notes (OTT)
HBO Go Is Going Away As WarnerMedia Thins Streaming Herd, Rebrands HBO Now
By Dade Hayes, Deadline.com - Jun. 12, 2020

WarnerMedia has followed through on plans to put HBO Go, its streaming app for pay-TV subscribers, out to pasture.
I use HBO GO pretty regularly .. is there any news regarding getting HBO NOW as part of a CATV HBO subscription that would still be free with subscription .. ?? Or will consumers have to pay for HBO NOW / MAX and just cancel the CATV subscription .. ??
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,084 Posts
I use HBO GO pretty regularly .. is there any news regarding getting HBO NOW as part of a CATV HBO subscription that would still be free with subscription .. ?? Or will consumers have to pay for HBO NOW / MAX and just cancel the CATV subscription .. ??
Does CATV stand for Cable Television? Most large cable providers that already offered HBO as part of their subscription package have signed agreements with AT&T to offer HBO Max with the same cable subscription and at the same price. Those login credentials should work with the HBO Max app on a streaming device.

What device do you use to access HBO GO?

The big issue currently is no HBO Max support on either the Roku or Amazon platforms. You can still use HBO GO or HBO NOW on those platforms to view the HBO linear content, but you can not access the MAX content on HBO Max unless you have the standalone HBO Max app installed. Something that is not officially available on either platform. You can sideload the Android TV HBO Max on a Fire TV device, but that is not official. If I had to guess, I would suspect that AT&T is moving up the sun-setting of HBO GO in order to create a sense of urgency and a bit of panic among the Roku and Amazon user base in the hopes that they all pressure their respective platform providers to get a deal done with AT&T and get HBO Max on their platforms.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,129 Posts
When they announced HBO MAX Ihat gave me access to HBO GO, I immediately canceled my cable subscription to HBO and subscribed to HBO NOW on the Apple TV which upon the start of HBO MAX gave me access to the expanded platform for the same price. The same price IMO a win win.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
8,958 Posts
Does CATV stand for Cable Television?
No. It is Community Antenna TeleVision. But, it has become to basically mean cable TV.

It goes back to the days before cable exited, whereby an antenna was set up and distributed to several people. Say you were in a valley. An antenna was placed up on a hill and would feed several people.

Believe it or not, CATV still exists. My friend in southern England lives in an old development that has a single antenna that feeds all of the members of that community.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,952 Posts
When they announced HBO MAX Ihat gave me access to HBO GO, I immediately canceled my cable subscription to HBO and subscribed to HBO NOW on the Apple TV which upon the start of HBO MAX gave me access to the expanded platform for the same price. The same price IMO a win win.
What’s your cable provider that didn’t just give you free HBO Max, like most of them did for their linear HBO subscribers?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
63,353 Posts
Discussion Starter #36,472
Nielsen Notes (Broadcast)
TV Long View: The 2019-20 Season's Hidden Numbers
By Rick Porter, The Hollywood Reporter - Jun. 13, 2020

The primary portion of the strange 2019-20 TV season — which saw a host of shows end before they planned to, and some never debut, due to the coronavirus pandemic — is over. The broadcast rankings have been tallied, and the downward trend in linear ratings continues, despite a spike in viewing during the spring as millions more people than normal stayed in and turned on their televisions.

All that has been covered. The ratings figures below, however, give a fuller picture of the ups and downs of the season. Like how seemingly everyone was watching and talking about Netflix's Tiger King … until they weren't. And how a documentary series about the NBA 22 years ago became the biggest thing in sports in the absence of live competition (and bigger than a lot of the competition that did air earlier in the season). And how the season's top broadcast shows may have lost viewers, but remained on top because nearly everything else did too.

Here are some of the hidden numbers of the 2019-20 season.

2: Non-sports shows on the broadcast networks with a seven-day adults 18-49 rating of 2.5 or higher — The Masked Singer (3.2) and This Is Us (2.9).

7: The number of shows that met that standard in 2018-19.

16 percent, 24 percent, 20 percent: Declines in adults 18-49 for The Masked Singer and This Is Us, and the average drop for all broadcast shows this season.

5.65 million: Average same-day viewership for The Last Dance, ESPN's 10-part docuseries about Michael Jordan and his final season with the Chicago Bulls in 1997-98. All 10 episodes surpassed the previous record for an ESPN original documentary (3.6 million for You Don't Know Bo in 2012).

4.41 million: The audience for ESPN's most-watched actual NBA game of the season (Lakers-Blazers on Jan. 31, when the Lakers honored the late Kobe Bryant). Only a pair of Christmas Day games on ABC and TNT's All-Star Game coverage in February outdrew The Last Dance.

19 million: The average U.S. viewership of Netflix's Tiger King over its first 10 days, according to Nielsen (figures Netflix says are incomplete; the streamer doesn't release viewer averages of its own).

5.34 billion: The number of minutes U.S. Netflix users spent streaming Tiger King at its peak from March 23-29. That's equivalent to 10,156 years.

4: Weeks before the show fell off Nielsen's top 10 streaming minutes chart.

30: The number of first-year broadcast scripted shows to premiere since September.

14: The number that have been renewed as of publication time.

47: Percentage of first-year network shows renewed thus far (with seven shows still to be determined), in line with the past two years (49 percent) and ahead of the 10-year average (40 percent).

1.93, 5.37 million: Adults 18-49 rating and total viewers with a week of delayed viewing for The Walking Dead this season.

27 percent, 68 percent: The show's margins over the next highest-rated scripted series on cable, FX's American Horror Story.

15: Network series (excluding NFL telecasts) that averaged at least 10 million viewers per episode, including a week of delayed viewing.

7: The number of those shows that aired on CBS: NCIS (15.34 million), FBI (12.55 million), Blue Bloods (11.96 million), Young Sheldon (11.55 million), Bull (10.61 million), 60 Minutes (10.46 million) and FBI: Most Wanted (10.2 million).

23.73 million, 3.2: The audience for the post-Super Bowl episode of The Masked Singer, and the number of times larger it was than the same-day average for all other episodes (7.39 million).

4.2 million: Average three-day audience for 90 Day Fiancé: Before the 90 Days on TLC, the most ever for a series in the multi-show franchise. So strong were the show's numbers in the spring — it also hit franchise highs in TLC's target demo of women 25-54 — that the cable channel has ordered B90 Strikes Back, a remotely shot show in which Before the 90 Days cast members watch the just completed season, comment on it and respond to social media criticism and mockery.

4: Seasons it had been since a network show had averaged more than 20 million viewers before NBC's Sunday Night Football averaged 20.09 million in the fall. Three shows (SNF, The Big Bang Theory and NCIS) accomplished the feat in 2015-16.

https://www.hollywoodreporter.com/live-feed/2019-20-tv-seasons-hidden-numbers-1298265
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
63,353 Posts
Discussion Starter #36,473
Nielsen Overnights (Broadcast)
Friday Ratings: Fox’s ‘WWE Friday Night SmackDown’ Tops The Field
By Bruce Haring, Deadline.com - Jun. 13, 2020

Dutch philosopher Desiderius Erasmus Roterodamus noted in the 16th century, “In the land of the blind, the one-eyed man is king.” He wasn’t talking about Friday’s ratings, but he might as well have been.

On a night almost entirely stacked with reruns/encores/repeats, Fox’s WWE Friday Night SmackDown provided an oasis of new content. The final night of the intercontinental championship tournament saw Daniel Bryan and AJ Styles face off for the title. The night is the prelude to the WWE’s eagerly awaited Backlash.

The show had an 0.5 to lead the demo wars on the evening, although the largest audience honors went to a rerun of CBS’s Magnum P.I., which had a P2+ of 4051.

Every other show on the major networks offered a rerun, save The CW’s Masters Of Illusion, which had an 0.1 in its 8 PM half-hour slot before the segue to reruns for the rest of the night’s CW network fare.

https://www.hollywoodreporter.com/news/mel-winkler-actor-devil-a-blue-dress-doc-hollywood-dies-at-78-1298033
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
63,353 Posts
Discussion Starter #36,474
TV Sports/Business Notes (Baseball)
Players' union done negotiating, tells MLB to simply tell the players when to show up for work
By Bob Nightengale, USA Today - Jun. 13, 2020

The Major League Baseball Players Association informed MLB on Saturday night that they are done negotiating and want an answer by Monday on how many games they’ll play and when to show up for work.

“It’s now become apparent that these efforts have fallen upon dead ears,’’ Tony Clark, executive director of the MLBPA, said in a statement. “In recent days, owners have decried the supposed unprofitability of owning a baseball team and the Commissioner has repeatedly threatened to schedule a dramatically shortened season unless players agree to hundreds of millions in further concessions. Our response has been consistently that such concessions are unwarranted, would be fundamentally unfair to players, and our sport deserves the fullest 2020 season possible. These remain our positions today, particularly in light of new reports regarding MLB’s national television rights — information that we requested from the league weeks ago but were never provided.

“As a result, it unfortunately appears that further dialogue with the league would be futile. It’s time to get back to work. Tell us when and where.’’

In other words, the union now is simply waiting for Commissioner Rob Manfred to unilaterally impose a short season, perhaps as few as 50 games, which would require the players to be paid at a prorated basis.

"We have been consistent and upfront about everything from the beginning,’’ said Andrew Miller, a member of the union’s executive committee. "We want to play and have made that abundantly clear. It’s clear the negotiations were not being productive and it was time to put the ball into the hands of MLB to let us know when we should come to work."

Just like that, unless MLB comes back with a proposal that would pay the players full-prorated salaries without fans in the stands, 10 weeks of negotiations are over.

No expanded postseason.

No broadcast enhancements.

No cooperation.

And perhaps plenty of players who may simply decide to sit out the season and rejoin their teams for spring training next season.

“Ugly,’’ one MLB owner said. “And it’s going to get worse.’’

In the letter lead attorney Bruce Meyer sent to deputy commissioner Dan Halem, he reiterated that the players will not take any pay cut from their prorated salaries, particularly in light of a news report that MLB has agreed to a lucrative contract extension with Turner Sports. The deal has yet to be finalized and will not be in effect until 2022, two high-ranking officials with direct knowledge of the negotiations said, and will have no impact on this year’s economic losses.

“We have made clear numerous times that players are not willing to accept less than their full prorated salaries for playing games,’’ Meyer said in a letter obtained by USA TODAY Sports. “Your recitation of the March Agreement and negotiations leading up to it is both inaccurate and largely irrelevant. …

“Your failure to produce numerous categories of documents that would allow us to validate your claims provided further confirmation of our position. For example, we still have never received unredacted RSN and national TV contracts or sponsorship agreements, the details of ongoing discussions with TV networks and sponsors, or projections of the value of any expanded playoffs. …

“As far as how you have conducted negotiations and without getting into all of your underhanded tactics to circumvent the union, your approach has been one delay tactic after another: You wasted most of April and May on lobbying politicians regarding player concessions and leaking a so-called revenue sharing proposal to the media. …Your response has been wholly inadequate, and the league has continued to obstruct the Association’s efforts to obtain even a modicum of financial transparency from the league and its clubs.’’

The union also believes that baseball should be played into November, despite MLB’s insistence that doctors and medical experts have warned them of a second wave of the virus, which potentially would cancel the postseason, and a loss of about $900 million.

“Your refusal to play games in October is purportedly based primarily on concern for player health,’’ the letter continues. “We believe this is a pretext. We note that we requested information at our May 31 meeting on any basis for not playing games in October. You agreed to provide such information but we have yet to receive it. Other leagues are planning on playing in October and November, and we have proposed having the flexibility to play games at neutral sites if necessary to address any safety concerns. We believe your position is part and parcel of your general bad faith determination to play as few games as possible to punish players for refusing to capitulate to MLB’s demands for massive pay cuts.

“Players remain united in their stance that a day’s work is worth a day’s pay, particularly in a situation where players and their families are being asked to take on additional burdens and risks. Given your continued insistence on hundreds of millions of dollars of additional pay reductions, we assume these negotiations are at an end. If it is your intention to unilaterally impose a season, we again request that you inform us and our members of how many games you intend to play and when and where players should report. It is unfair to leave players and the fans hanging at this point, and further delay risks compromising health and safety.

“We demand that you inform us of your plans by close of business on Monday, June 15.’’

Major League Baseball responded Saturday night with a statement that read in part, "We are disappointed that the MLBPA has chosen not to negotiate in good faith over resumption of play after MLB has made three successive proposals that would provide players, Clubs and our fans with an amicable resolution to a very difficult situation caused by the COVID-19 pandemic. ...

"‘We will evaluate the Union’s refusal to adhere to the terms of the March Agreement, and after consulting with ownership, determine the best course to bring baseball back to our fans.”

It’s possible that MLB could submit a counter-proposal, after their last proposal guaranteeing 70% pay during a 76-game regular season and 80% if there’s a postseason, but why bother?

MLB could turn around and propose a shortened season between 60 and 70 games with full pro-rated pay, guaranteeing a 16-team postseason, but it’s unlikely.

Simply, it’s clear these two sides have reached an impasse.

It’s now in Manfred’s hands.

There will be a season, perhaps starting as early as July 14, but the joy of a 2020 season has vanished in a sea of emails and zoom calls during these tumultuous negotiations.

Play ball, like it or not.

https://www.usatoday.com/story/sports/mlb/2020/06/13/mlb-players-association-reject-league-offer-expect-short-season/3185398001/
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
63,353 Posts
Discussion Starter #36,475
Obituary
Batman’s most influential writer, Denny O’Neil, dies at 81
By Susana Polo, Polygon.com - Jun. 12, 2020

Denny O’Neil, co-creator of Ra’s al Ghul and editor of DC Comics’ Batman titles for over 15 years, died Thursday at the age of 81. His legacy as a writer and editor of superhero comics is wide-ranging and difficult to overstate — he may have been the most influential Batman writer since the character’s creation.

News of O’Neil’s death was originally reported by Newsarama.

Entering the comics workforce in at the age of 27 in 1966, O’Neil was a part of the second generation of superhero creators, the first to grow up reading superhero stories — but he was also of the hippie generation. And while perhaps not 100% hippie-identified himself, he once explained that he took his first comics writing job in New York City after agitating the police so much that he had to leave town.

“I was a journalist who had managed to alienate virtually everybody who was an authority figure in the small town where I was working,” O’Neil said during a panel about comics in the year 1968 at New York Comic Con 2018. He continued:

This is a very ultra conservative town. I wrote a phony Associated Press release about how Martin Luther King was coming to Cape Girardeau and gonna do some demonstrating and I slipped that onto the clipboard that all the cops had to read before going on duty. Then I went around about my beat — hospitals, firehouses — got back to the office and the guy across the street who worked for one of the two radio stations said “I don’t know if you had anything to do with that Martin Luther King business, and I don’t want to know, but if you did, don’t admit it, whatever you do, do not admit it.”

So I went about my day and I was walking back to the little shack I rented and there was the chief of detectives coming out. Thank god none of my hippie friends left any drugs there. And I was taken off the beat the next day, but at that point a week earlier, I had taken the famous Stan Lee writer’s exam, contest, thing. And so just as I had alienated everybody in Cape Girardeau and was about to lose my job, along came Stan and [Marvel Comics editor in chief Roy Thomas] riding over the hilltop with the job for me. It was mine if I wanted to take it.


O’Neil was at the forefront of a wave of young liberal comics readers-turned creators, who dragged superheroes kicking and screaming from post-war shenanigans into the massive social upheavals of the 1960s.

When his career is summed up for those not deeply invested in comics, it’s usually in the language of characters and moments. The enigmatic Batman villain Ra’s al Ghul is his biggest co-creation, the revitalization of the Joker and Two-Face from obscurity a close second. O’Neil also made the friendship between Green Lantern and Green Arrow indelible, and penned several famous moments in comics that, while a little hokey by today’s standards, exemplified the rapidly changing tides of superheroic tone.

There’s the sequence of a black man asking Hal Jordan why he fights for downtrodden aliens of all colors, but will not fight for downtrodden humans; Green Arrow’s sidekick getting hooked on heroin; Superman fighting Muhammad Ali. But what we can also see in those moments is a young writer grappling with what it could mean for comics to be for an audience that wasn’t just grade school kids — and the kind of clear messages that grade school kids deserved to get in their comics.

“You work for the blue skins [...] on a planet someplace you once helped out the orange skins, and you don considerable for the purple skins! Only there’s some skins you never bothered with — the black skins! I want to know ... how come?! Answer me that, Mr. Green Lantern!” an elderly Black man accuses Hal Jordan in Green Lantern #76 , DC Comics (1970).

One early blunder included de-powering Wonder Woman, a move that caught the ire of no less a personality than Gloria Steinem, and for which O’Neil expressed a significant amount of embarrassed contrition ever after.

But O’Neil was always pulling superheroes down from the skies and into street level urban stories, even those who wouldn’t otherwise seem to belong there. Under his pen, Green Lantern had to face terrestrial racial politics, Green Arrow lost his fortune to fight for the common man, and then, of course, there was Batman.

After starting his career at Charlton Comics and Marvel, O’Neil began working primarily in Batman comics at the start of the 1970s, in the wake of the 1966-68 Batman television series, which had hooked America on a campy do-gooder bopping weirdo pranksters on the snoot. Batman did not leap straight from Adam West to Frank Miller’s The Dark Knight Returns; the anti-hero Batman of the 1980s was less an extreme swing than a considered step from Denny O’Neil’s caped crusader.

Under O’Neil’s pen, the smiling crimefighter morphed into someone flawed but constantly striving to be one more inch better, a man whose intellect and physical prowess were rivaled only by his empathy for all victims of violence, everywhere. And though he might need to be reminded of that on occasions when his obsession — and general emotional constipation — got the better of him, that was the tension from which fantastic stories sprang.

And when O’Neil stepped down from writing Batman stories and moved back to Marvel, he would return, six years later, to begin his tenure of editing them. For my money, that’s where his true genius lies. The first time Frank Miller drew Batman, it was for a Denny O’Neil story. After that, O’Neil gave Miller full control of Daredevil, the book that would make the young artist famous. And after that, he edited The Dark Knight Returns and tapped Miller to write Batman: Year One, a crucial redefinition of the character for a new era. He mentored Devin Grayson, still the only woman to be the lead writer on a core Batman book, and built a Batman bullpen of some of the best talent to ever grace the character’s pages.

From the pivotal post-Crisis on Infinite Earths year of 1986 through to the year 2000, O’Neil set the tone for Batman stories, editing The Killing Joke, overseeing the death of Jason Todd, the creation of new Robin Tim Drake, the rise of Bane, and the expansion of the Bat-family into a sprawling found-family soap opera.

It was O’Neil’s Batman, the character he’d written, and the stories he edited, that set the source material for every modern Batman film or TV adaptation. Without his revamp of the Joker from prankster to killer, Batman (1989) would not have had a villain. His Batman is undeniably the source for the humanist, rehabilitation-dedicated lead of Batman: The Animated Series — for which he wrote the two-part episode that introduced Ra’s al Ghul. Of the five comics that had the most influence on 2008’s The Dark Knight, O’Neil wrote, edited, or was in charge of the Batman office while they were made, for all but one.

It is safe to say that the only Batman writer more influential than O’Neil was Bill Finger, the guy who co-created him.

I was born the year Denny O’Neil began editing Batman, and while the character is as endlessly elastic as any superhero, I grew up in a world of comics, movies, and television informed by — or sometimes simply made to emulate — his specific definition of Batman. It was a definition that I have loved since the moment I was introduced to it, one that provided a foundation for my personal ethics, as well as what I believe stories can and should do for their readers.

The fact that that version of Batman could be traced back to one creator was something it took me years to discover. But O’Neil, who said that he preferred the role of editor to be of an invisible support to the writer and artist, would have wanted it that way. You only have to read the words of the creators who worked under him to know that support was no less strong for being virtually unseen.

https://www.polygon.com/comics/21289376/batman-denny-oneil-dies-dc-best-comics-history
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
63,353 Posts
Discussion Starter #36,476
TV Notes
On The Air
SUNDAY JUN. 14, 2020 Network Primetime/Late Night Options
(All shows are in HD unless noted; start times are ET. Network late night shows are preceded by late local news)
From Zap2it.com's TV Grid

ABC:
7PM - America's Funniest Home Videos (Season Finale)
8PM - Celebrity Family Feud: The Bold Type vs. RuPaul's Drag Race
9PM - Press Your Luck
10PM - Match Game (Joel McHale, Amy Sedaris, Kevin Smith, Raven-Symoné, Ne-Yo and Malin Akerman)

CBS:
7PM - 60 Minutes
8PM - 60 Minutes
(R)
9PM - NCIS: Los Angeles
(R)
10PM - NCIS: Los Angeles
(R)

NBC:
7PM - Hollywood Game Night
8PM - The Titan Games
(R)
9PM - America's Got Talent (120 min.)
(R)

FOX:
7PM - Last Man Standing
(R)
7:30PM - Duncanville
(R)
8PM - The Simpsons
(R)
8:30PM - Bless the Harts
(R)
9PM - Bob's Burgers
(R)
9:30PM - Family Guy
(R)

THE CW:
8PM - DC's Stargirl
(R)
9PM - Supergirl
(R)

PBS:
8PM - Prince Albert: A Victorian Hero Revealed
9PM - Grantchester on Masterpiece (Season Premiere)
10PM - Beecham House on Masterpiece (Season Premiere)

UNIVISION:
7PM - Aquí y Ahora
8PM - Movie: Penguins of Madagascar (2014)
10:30PM - Sal y Pimienta

TELEMUNDO:
7PM - Movie - Jarhead 3: The Siege (2016)
9:30PM - Movie: Takers (2010)

NBCSN:
7PM - Motorcycle Racing, Monster Energy Supercross: Salt Lake City (3 hrs., LIVE)

OXYGEN:
7PM - Deadly Cults (Season Finale)

ESPN 2:
7:30PM - EGF High School National Championship of Rocket League (90 min., LIVE)

ANIMAL PLANET:
8PM - North Woods Law: Protect and Preserve
9PM - North Woods Law
10:01PM - Lone Star Law: Texas Justice (Season Premiere)
10:31PM - Lone Star Law: Texas Justice

HISTORY:
8PM - American Pickers: 4 Wheel Gold
9PM - World War II: Race to Victory (Premiere, 125 min.)

LIFETIME:
8PM - Movie: All My Husband's Wives (2019)

NAT GEO:
8PM - Wicked Tuna (123 min.)
10:03PM - Gordon Ramsay: Uncharted

SHOWTIME:
8PM - VICE
9PM - Billions
10PM - Penny Dreadful: City of Angels

STARZ:
8PM - Hightown

TLC:
8PM - 90 Day Fiancé: Happily Ever After? (Season Premiere, 122 min.)
10:02PM - sMothered

AMC:
9PM - Quiz: Episode 3 (Finale, 75 min.)

BRAVO:
9PM - Married to Medicine
10PM - Watch What Happens Live With Andy Cohen (Guests TBA)

CNN:
9PM - Mayors Who Matter: A CNN Town Hall on Race and COVID-19 (LIVE)
10PM - CNN Special Report (LIVE)

ESPN/ESPN 2:
9PM - 30 for 30: Long Gone Summer (120 min.)

FOOD NETWORK:
9PM - Worst Cooks in America (Season Finale, 90 min.)
10:30PM - Beat Bobby Flay

HALLMARK:
9PM - Good Witch

HBO:
9PM - I Know This Much Is True: Episode 6 (Finale, 80 min.)
10:20PM - Insecure (Season Finale, 31 min.)
10:51PM - I May Destroy You (32 min.)
* * * *
11:23PM - Last Week Tonight with John Oliver

SCIENCE:
9PM - Unearthed: Egypt's Sunken Treasures (Season Finale)
10PM - Forbidden History: Secrets of the Salem Witches (Season Finale)

TNT:
9PM - Snowpiercer
10:01PM - Snowpiercer
(R)

MSNBC:
10PM - American Crisis: Poverty and the Pandemic (Special, 60 min.)

ADULT SWIM:
Midnight - The Shivering Truth
12:15AM - JJ Villard's Fairy Tales: Snow White


https://tvlistings.zap2it.com/?aid=gapzap
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,129 Posts
What’s your cable provider that didn’t just give you free HBO Max, like most of them did for their linear HBO subscribers?
xfinity which didn't sign on until the last minute
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,637 Posts
No. It is Community Antenna TeleVision. But, it has become to basically mean cable TV.

It goes back to the days before cable exited, whereby an antenna was set up and distributed to several people. Say you were in a valley. An antenna was placed up on a hill and would feed several people.

Believe it or not, CATV still exists. My friend in southern England lives in an old development that has a single antenna that feeds all of the members of that community.
And then in rural areas in the 1950s there were "reflectors" where someone (in our case a local TV repairman) would put up an antenna to receive TV stations about 120 miles away, take that signal and run it through a "signal booster" and send it out into the valley via a dipole antenna. The FCC didn't like that much so the reflector was replaced with a translator which took the signals and put them up on the high end of the UHF channels and broadcast them back out.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
63,353 Posts
Discussion Starter #36,479 (Edited)
TV/Production Notes (Cable)
Ben Whishaw to Star in 'This Is Going to Hurt' for AMC, BBC
By Rick Porter, The Hollywood Reporter - Jun. 14, 2020

Ben Whishaw is headed to the hospital.

Whishaw (A Very English Scandal, Mary Poppins Returns) will star in a dramedy called This Is Going to Hurt for the BBC and AMC. The cable net has come aboard to co-produce the series with the BBC. The show comes from production companies Sister (Chernobyl, Gangs of London) and Terrible Productions.

Lucy Forbes (The End of the F***ing World) has also joined the series as lead director.

The eight-episode This Is Going to Hurt is based on a best-selling memoir by Adam Kay, who is adapting his book for the series. Adam (Whishaw) wends his way through his hospital's hierarchy, where he's junior enough to suffer crippling hours but senior enough to face a constant barrage of terrifying responsibilities. He clings to his personal life as he is increasingly overwhelmed by the stresses at work, including 97-hour weeks to life-and-death decisions, all while knowing the hospital parking meter is earning more than he is.

"As we continue to search for unique voices and uncover authentic and rarely seen worlds, we’re proud to once again partner with the remarkable creative team at Sister on this timely series focusing a lens on the societal and cultural issues surrounding the healthcare system," said Dan McDermott, president original programming at AMC and co-president of AMC Studios. "Adam has provided insightful source material with This is Going to Hurt, laying a foundation for a topical, darkly comedic and breathtakingly poignant series, and we’re thrilled to welcome established talent both in front of and behind the camera with Ben Whishaw and Lucy Forbes on board."

Said Whishaw, "I am proud to join this exciting adaptation of Adam Kay’s terrific book This is Going to Hurt based on his experiences working in the NHS. It’s an honest, hilarious, heart-breaking look at the great institution and the army of unsung heroes who work there under the most stressful conditions. The COVID-19 crisis has now shed even more light on their great work and underlines the necessity to support the NHS and its workers. I look forward to telling this story with director Lucy Forbes and the great team at Sister to bring Adam’s words to life and I am really grateful to be a part of it."

Kay created and is writing and executive producing the series, which was commissioned by BBC Drama controller Piers Wenger. Sister's Naomi de Pear and Jane Featherstone also executive produce along with James Farrell for Terrible Productions, Mona Qureshi for BBC Two and Kristin Jones and McDermott for AMC. Holly Pullinger produces, and Forbes is set to direct the first four episodes.

Dan Isaacs, COO of Sister, and Phil Sequeira, vp scripted co-productions at BBC Studios, brokered the deal with AMC for the United States and Canada. BBC Studios will distribute the show globally.

https://www.hollywoodreporter.com/live-feed/ben-whishaw-star-is-going-hurt-amc-bbc-1298294
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
63,353 Posts
Discussion Starter #36,480
This article was originally printed on June 4, 2020.

TV/Critic's Notes
How Herman Munster can be so right about racism and still be a little bit wrong
By Hank Stuever, Washington Post

So it happens, in the America of 2020, that while the Rev. Al Sharpton was eulogizing George Floyd in Minneapolis on Thursday afternoon after 10 days of protest and unrest across the country over police killings of black people, many others were online exalting the wisdom of Herman Munster, sharing and re-sharing a clip from an episode of the original “Munsters” TV sitcom that aired 55 years ago.

In the clip, Herman (a Frankenstein’s monster who happens to be a husband and father) is trying to teach his little werewolfish son, Eddie Munster, a vital lesson in self-worth and acceptance of others.

“The lesson I want you to learn,” Herman says, “is that it doesn’t matter what you look like. You could be tall or short, or fat or thin, or ugly — or handsome, like your father — or you can be black or yellow or white, it doesn’t matter. But what does matter is the size of your heart and the strength of your character.”

There’s nothing wrong, per se, with what Herman (played by the late actor Fred Gwynne) says or how he says it — except that it doesn’t quite get us where we need to be right now. In fact, it’s another way for people (white people, let’s say) to let themselves off the hook, by once more declaring that race “doesn’t matter” and equating it with appearance (ugly or handsome; fat or thin). Celebrating Herman’s simple wisdom is an entirely too facile way of glossing over a moment in which America may at last be at a breakthrough with its own history. His speech to Eddie is flavored, subtextually, with the same logic that strays in the direction of “All lives matter.”

Black, or yellow, or white. (Or cadaverous green — it doesn’t matter!) I can almost hear some big, booming voices from decades ago, who always felt compelled to add to this sentiment a list of races that didn’t even exist: “Doesn’t matter to me if you’re purple and polka-dotted,” my middle-school basketball coach once said to my all-white teammates and me, 40 years ago, as we prepared for a scrimmage game at an Indian reservation.

But I get it. For decades, TV viewers have been brought up to believe in the sort of equality that often exists only in the abstract, or in speeches from authority figures. It was drilled into us to see people’s character before anything else — the size of one’s heart, as Herman says — and forget our other differences.

He was about as woke as a sitcom character could be in 1965, speaking from the viewpoint of one of many old-school sitcom characters (Martians, hillbillies, housewife-witches) who metaphorically represented the ostracized Americans that Hollywood was too timid to directly portray. But looking past race didn’t bring us to the peace that Herman and other 20th-century idealists might have hoped it would.

The only unsettling part of this is the prevailing sentiment (seen mainly on Twitter, where Herman went viral) that the character was somehow way ahead of his time; in fact, his words are right in line with the language of those who stood up for civil rights in the mid-1960s.

“It doesn’t matter” is a clunky note to play in the era of Black Lives Matter. “It doesn’t matter” is too close to “I don’t care what you are,” the operative words being “I don’t care.”

What’s still good about Herman’s lecture was always good (try to be a big-hearted person of strong character), and yet, if we’ve learned anything in recent days, it’s that race completely matters — always has, always will, and not always negatively. The idea that someone’s race doesn’t matter conveys a notion that we don’t really care to explore one another’s identities, cultures and histories.

Yet that is the very thing we are being implored by this movement to do: listen, care and treat the entire experience of race like it matters. Herman was wise, but his words are too tidy for anyone who is sincere about living in the now and facing the real monster.

https://www.washingtonpost.com/entertainment/tv/how-herman-munster-can-be-so-right-about-racism-and-still-be-a-little-bit-wrong/2020/06/04/fc17fe6e-a6aa-11ea-b473-04905b1af82b_story.html
 
36461 - 36480 of 37363 Posts
Top