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Media/Business Notes
WarnerMedia To Sell CNN Atlanta Headquarters As Parent AT&T Seeks To Slash Debt
By Jill Goldsmith, Deadline.com - Jun. 29, 2020

WarnerMedia plans to sell the historic CNN Center in downtown Atlanta — the building attacked last month during a wave of protests — as parent AT&T looks to shed assets to help pare down its massive debt.

Plans to unload the property following the AT&T-Time Warner merger had been put on hold but resurfaced Monday in memo to CNN staffers. It’s a time of new ownerships and real estate shifts in the media world, with ViacomCBS also in the market to sell off the fabled CBS Black Rock building in New York City.

“We are consolidating our WarnerMedia Atlanta operations in our recently renovated and redesigned Techwood campus. This will increase collaboration and optimize use of Techwood, which was created to be a state-of-the-art hub for our diverse business portfolio. As part of these changes we are selling the CNN Center, which is a retail center, well positioned in the downtown entertainment area of the city. Once sold, we will lease back the property for a minimum of five years. There will be no immediate impact to employees working at the CNN Center,” WarnerMedia said in a statement.

“Now that we’ve had time to further evaluate, we’ve concluded that the best course of action is to sell the CNN Center,” the company said in a memo to employees. It will centralize most employees at its location in Techwood complex, also in Atlanta. It said the transition process would be “lengthy.”

It acknowledged the gravitas of such a sale, saying, “We recognize the historical relevance of the CNN Center. Ted Turner was a true pioneer who reinvented media when he launched the 24-hour news channel in 1980.”

“WarnerMedia was proud to play a part in solidifying Ted’s legacy last December with the dedication of our Techwood campus to him, the unveiling of a commissioned mural portrait on our campus and a donation to the University of Georgia, in partnership with the Turner Family and Turner Enterprises, that established the Ted Turner Exhibition Hall & Gallery at UGA’s library, the Ted Turner Scholarship Fund and the Ted Turner Maverick internship.”

The CNN Center was attacked by demonstrators who broke windows and threw firecrackers on May 29 in the midst of heated protests after the killing of George Floyd.

AT&T had planned to sell $10 billion in assets this year, a move that was in part stymied so far by the coronavirus pandemic. It has over $150 billion debt, inflated by the Time Warner acquisition. It sold Central European Media last year for $2.1 billion, as well as its stakes in Hulu, Hudson Yards offices and other real estate and cell towers. It was also reported to be looking to unload Warner Bros. Interactive Entertainment video game division.

“A part of efficiently running a business is constantly examining the operations to make sure we’re making the best use of our assets, including real estate,” the memo said.

https://deadline.com/2020/06/warnermedia-cnn-atlanta-headquarters-att-debt-1202973194/
 

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TV Sports/Critic's Notes (Baseball)
As Ryan Zimmerman and others opt out of 2020 MLB season, sport's new reality begins to settle in
By Gabe Lacques, TVLine.com - Jun. 28, 2020

For almost every athlete, there was no such thing as a cost-benefit analysis.

After all, if you are skilled enough and worked hard enough and were paid well enough to compete at sports for a living, what was there to analyze?

Yet in this time of COVID-19, everything requires reexamination – including whether to play at all, and whether to walk away for good.

Ryan Zimmerman opting out of the 2020 season was, on its own, not terribly surprising. He forecast his intentions in an ongoing diary for The Associated Press. He’s grossed $138 million in salary for his career, claimed a World Series championship months ago, has a mother who has long suffered from multiple sclerosis and a newborn child.

Yet now that the first draft pick and original face of the Washington Nationals franchise is out, likely ending an excellent career, it begs the question.

How many more Zimmermans will we never see again?

Certainly, there are far weightier issues to ponder globally – with the novel coronavirus killing more than 500,000 – and even within the fairly meaningless world of sport, where leagues are putting their athletes at some risk merely to try and rake in as much cash from their television partners.

But perhaps nothing speaks better to the scope and seriousness of this pandemic than someone electively terminating their livelihood.

Oh, Zimmerman made a point to say he was not retiring. But he knows how limited the market will be in 2021 for a 36-year-old part-time first baseman. Same for Mike Leake, who will not pitch in 2020 for reasons he did not divulge but possibly is family-related.

And though their teams went to great lengths to respect their decisions, we all know how sports culture works. Grinding through is just #PartOfIt , and while there will be public proclamations of support, these athletes undoubtedly weighed how they’d be received going forward into their decision.

And still they walked away.

This concept is just getting started. We’ve already seen two prominent WNBA players, Chiney Ogwumike and Kristi Toliver, opt out. The NBA will bubble up next month without Avery Bradley, Trevor Ariza and others, and for the time being await the recoveries of COVID-19-positive players Nikola Jokic and Malcolm Brogdon.

The NFL’s great reckoning over money, work conditions and fans in the stands is still a month or so away, but the sport with perhaps the greatest potential for spread and already with the direst work conditions will certainly see its share of opt-outs.

But baseball has been particularly unkind to older players as franchises scrimp for every last nickel even as record revenues float their values into the multi-billions. The Nationals may have sentimental reasons to let Zimmerman return for a deferred victory lap, with fans hopefully in the stands, in 2021. Otherwise, he’s likely done.

Leake, even at 33, may find a job because it’s increasingly harder to find anyone to throw 190 or so competent innings. But dozens of others may quietly disappear once dispatched from MLB’s 30 “summer camps.”

Felix Hernandez, Rich Hill, Jon Jay, Ubaldo Jimenez, Hunter Pence, Josh Harrison and Pablo Sandoval are among the familiar names that may have the uniform quietly peeled off them during an abbreviated “spring training,” or perhaps during what the league hopes is a 60-game season, or maybe when their phone doesn’t ring over what is expected to be a winter of much discontent within the game.

And then there are those who, for the moment, are willfully turning theirs in. It is an admirable, if startling act during a period in sports history we are only now beginning to comprehend.

https://www.usatoday.com/story/sports/mlb/columnist/gabe-lacques/2020/06/29/ryan-zimmerman-mlb-opt-out-baseball-2020-season/3282124001/
 

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TV Notes
On The Air
TUESDAY JUN. 30, 2020 Network Primetime/Late Night Options
(All shows are in HD unless noted; start times are ET. Network late night shows are preceded by late local news)
From Zap2it.com's TV Grid

ABC:
8PM - Modern Family
(R)
8:30PM - Modern Family
(R)
9PM - Black-ish
(R)
9:30PM - Mixed-ish
(R)
10PM - The Genetic Detective (Season Finale)
* * * *
11:35PM - Jimmy Kimmel Live! (Howie Mandel)
(R)
12:06AM - Nightline
12:37AM - Jimmy Kimmel Live! (Wanda Sykes)
(R)

CBS:
8PM - NCIS
(R)
9PM - FBI
(R)
10PM - FBI: Most Wanted
(R)
* * *
11:35PM - The Late Show With Stephen Colbert (Journalist Jake Tapper; Tame Impala performs)
(R)
12:37AM - The Late Late Show With James Corden (Journalist Gayle King; Adam Lambert performs)
(R)

NBC:
8PM - America's Got Talent (120 min.)
10:01PM - World of Dance
* * * *
11:34PM - The Tonight Show Starring Jimmy Fallon (Jennifer Lopez; Henry Winkler; Twenty One Pilots perform)
(R)
12:37AM - Late Night With Seth Meyers (Comic John Mulaney)
(R)
1:38AM - A Little Late With Lilly Singh (Comic Fortune Feimster)
(R)

FOX:
8PM - Gordon Ramsay's 24 Hours to Hell and Back (120 min.)

THE CW:
8PM - DC's Stargirl
9PM - Barry Brewer - Chicago, I'm Home (Stand-Up Special)
(R)

PBS:
8PM - Finding Your Roots With Henry Louis Gates, Jr.: Secrets & Lies
(R)
8PM - POV - And She Could Be Next: Claiming Power (90 min.)
10:30PM - Firing Line With Margaret Hoover (30 min.)

UNIVISION:
8PM - Te Doy La Vida
9PM - Amor Eterno
10PM - Como Tú No Hay Dos

TELEMUNDO:
8PM - Cennet
9PM - 100 Días Para Enamorarnos
10PM - Enemigo Intimo

ESPN 2:
7PM - NBA2K League: Week 8, Day 2 (4 hrs., LIVE)

ESPN:
8PM - Boxing: Alex Saucedo vs. Sonny Fredrickson (3 hrs., LIVE)

ESPN U:
8PM - ESPN's Greatest All-Time College Baseball Team (Special, 60 min.)

MTV:
8PM - Siesta Key (60 min.)

OWN:
8PM - If Loving You Is Wrong
9PM - Greenleaf
10PM - OWN Spotlight: Oprah and 100 Black Fathers (Special, 60 min.)

VH1:
8PM - Nick Cannon Presents: Wild 'n Out (Montell Jordan; Montel Williams)

NAT GEO:
9PM - Lost on Everest (Special)
10PM - Expedition Everest (Series Premiere)

TLC:
9PM - Outdaughtered (Season Finale)
10PM - Sweet Home Sextuplets

CNBC:
10PM - Supermarket Shock: Crisis in America's Food Supply

HBO:
10PM - Welcome to Chechnya (2020 Documentary Premiere, 110 min.)

TBS:
10PM - Celebrity Show-Off
* * * *
11PM - Conan (Hank Azaria)
(R)

TRUTV:
10PM - Tirdy Works

USA:
10PM - Dirty John (63 min.)


http://tvlistings.zap2it.com/?aid=gapzap
 

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TV/Production Notes (Broadcast)
L.A. Complex Reboot DOA at The CW
By Michael Ausiello, TVLine.com - Jun. 29, 2020

L.A. Complex 2.0 has received a very early eviction notice. The CW’s in-the-works reboot of the showbiz-themed Canadian soap is not moving forward, series co-creator Martin Gero has confirmed.

When a fan on Instagram asked Gero if the project — which was announced back in Oct. 2018 — was dead, the EP responded, “Sadly, yes.”

The original show — which premiered on The CW in the summer of 2012 and ran for two seasons — centered on a group of up-and-coming actors and musicians living in the same Hollywood apartment complex. It starred Cassie Steele (Degrassi: The Next Generation), Jewel Staite (Firefly), Joe Dinicol (Arrow, Blindspot), Jonathan Patrick Moore (Blindspot) and Andra Fuller (The Game), among others. (The Season 2 ensemble went through something of a shake-up, as characters moved in and out of the complex.)

The ill-fated reboot, which was to be penned by Gero and co-creator Brendan Gall, would’ve followed a new group of twentysomething tenants/artists living in Hollywood’s Luxe hotel.

https://tvline.com/2020/06/29/colin-kaepernick-limited-series-netflix-ordered-ava-duvernay/

* * * *

TV/Production Notes (Broadcast)
Revenge Reboot Dead: ABC Passes on Sequel Series Starring Fan Favorite

Revenge is apparently a dish best served only once.

ABC is passing on its in-the-works follow-up to the 2011-15 Emily VanCamp drama, TVLine has learned. The potential “sequel” series was set to follow a young Latina immigrant who arrives in Malibu to exact revenge on a pharmaceutical dynasty that caused “the murder of her biochemist mother, the destruction of her family and a global epidemic.”

Interestingly, the protagonist was going to be guided by one of the original show’s “favorite characters,” rumored to be Gabriel Mann’s Nolan.

Original series creator Mike Kelley was to serve as executive producer on the sequel. Joe Fazzio, who wrote and produced multiple episodes during the show’s initial run, was also on board as a EP.

Revenge, which ran for four seasons on ABC, starred VanCamp as Amanda Clarke, a young woman who came to the Hamptons to exact revenge on the Graysons, a wealthy family that betrayed her and her father. Madeleine Stowe, Nick Wechsler and the aforementioned Mann rounded out the main cast.

https://tvline.com/2020/06/29/revenge-reboot-cancelled-abc-sequel-series-nolan/
 

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Joey Joey Joey....

Obviously wont be in the same location & with less eaters but at least still happening.

ESPN to Televise Nathan’s Famous Hot Dog-Eating Contest on July 4
by Laughing Place Disney Newsdesk | Jun 29, 2020

Nathan’s Famous Hot Dog-Eating Contest will air live on Saturday, July 4, at noon ET on ESPN.
The one-hour telecast marks the 17th consecutive year ESPN has televised the event.
Coverage kicks off at 12pm ET, with the women’s championship, followed by the men’s championship.
Nathan’s Famous will conduct the 2020 Fourth of July International Hot Dog-Eating Contest in Coney Island on Saturday, July 4, 2020.
The annual contest, an American holiday tradition that traditionally has been held on the corner of Surf and Stillwell Avenues for generations, will take place in a private location with COVID-19 safety measures in place.

The special event will feature commentary and analysis by:
ESPN Mike Golic Jr. with the play-by-play
ESPN’s Jason Fitz
Major League Eating’s Richard Shea with an in-depth analysis

Joey Chestnut is competing for a record 13th title in the men’s contest against 5 other competitors
Miki Sudo will be competing in the women’s contest for her 7th title.

https://www.laughingplace.com/w/news/2020/06/29/espn-televise-nathans-famous-hot-dog-eating-contest-july-4-2020/
 

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Obituary
Carl Reiner, Multifaceted Master of Comedy, Is Dead at 98
By Robert Berkvist and Peter Keepnews, The New York Times - Jun. 30, 2020

Carl Reiner, who as performer, writer and director earned a place in comedy history several times over, died on Monday night at his home in Beverly Hills, Calif. He was 98.

His death was confirmed by his daughter, Annie Reiner.

Mr. Reiner first attracted national attention in 1950 as Sid Caesar’s multitalented second banana on the television variety show “Your Show of Shows,” for which he was also a writer. A decade later he created “The Dick Van Dyke Show,” one of the most celebrated situation comedies in television history, and teamed with Mel Brooks on the hugely successful “2000 Year Old Man” records. His novel “Enter Laughing” became both a hit Broadway play and the first of many movies he would direct; among the others were four of Steve Martin’s early starring vehicles.

He won praise as an actor as well, with memorable roles in films like “The Russians Are Coming, the Russians Are Coming” and, more recently, “Ocean’s Eleven” and its sequels. But he spent most of his career just slightly out of the spotlight, letting others get the laughs.

His contributions were recognized by his peers, by comedy aficionados and, in 2000, by the Kennedy Center, which awarded him the Mark Twain Prize for American Humor. He was the third recipient, after Richard Pryor and Jonathan Winters.

In his performances with Mr. Brooks and before that with Mr. Caesar, Mr. Reiner specialized in portraying the voice of sanity, a calm presence in a chaotic universe. But despite his claim to the contrary, he was never “just the straight man.”

“He was a comedian himself, and he truly understood and still understands comedy,” Mr. Caesar said of Mr. Reiner in his book “Caesar’s Hours” (2003), written with Eddy Friedfeld. “Most people still don’t realize the importance of a straight man in comedy, or how difficult that role is. Carl had to make his timing my timing.”

Mr. Reiner was, Mr. Caesar added, “the best straight man I’ve ever worked with.”

As part of a stellar supporting cast that also included Imogene Coca and Howard Morris, Mr. Reiner proved his versatility week after week on “Your Show of Shows,” which ran from 1950 to 1954 on NBC and established the template for sketch comedy on television. He played everything from a harried commuter to a frenzied rock ’n’ roller to an unctuous quiz-show host. But he is probably best remembered as an interviewer, solemnly posing questions to a mad professor, a spaced-out jazz musician or some other over-the-top character played by Mr. Caesar, and adding to the humor simply by being serious.

Mr. Reiner contributed behind the scenes as well. He took part in the frenzied writing sessions that shaped the show, bouncing jokes off the walls of the writers’ room with the likes of Mr. Brooks and Neil Simon.

“I became a writer because of that room,” he recalled. “I’d say something and somebody would yell: ‘What do you know? You’re not a writer.’ So I became a writer.”

He characterized his later career moves with similar self-effacing humor in an NPR interview: “I acted like a director. I acted like a producer. I sat in front of a typewriter and acted like a novelist.”

Mr. Reiner’s association with Mr. Caesar encompassed three different series: After “Your Show of Shows” the two worked together on “Caesar’s Hour,” which had a three-year run on NBC, and “Sid Caesar Invites You,” a failed attempt to recapture the “Show of Shows” spirit that lasted less than one season on ABC in 1958.

The Party Piece

The next phase of Mr. Reiner’s career found him again in the role of deadpan interviewer. This time the interviewee was Mr. Brooks.

“The 2000 Year Old Man” began as an act Mr. Reiner and Mr. Brooks performed for friends at parties. When they put it on record, it became a phenomenon. There were ultimately five “2000 Year Old Man” albums, one of which won a Grammy and all of which are treasured by comedians and comedy fans.

Mr. Brooks was the star of the largely improvised routines, reflecting on what it was like to be two millenniums old (none of his thousands of children ever visited) and reminiscing about historical figures like Sigmund Freud (“He was a good basketball player; very few people know that”) and Shakespeare (“He had the worst penmanship I ever saw in my life”). But it was Mr. Reiner who came up with the questions that lit Mr. Brooks’s comedic fuse.

Indeed, it was Mr. Reiner who spontaneously started the ball rolling one day during a quiet moment in the Caesar writers’ room. “I turned to Mel and I said, ‘Here’s a man who was actually seen at the crucifixion 2,000 years ago,’” he told The New York Times in 2009, “and his first words were ‘Oh, boy.’”

“I always knew if I threw a question to Mel he could come up with something,” Mr. Reiner said. “I learned a long time ago that if you can corner a genius comedy brain in panic, you’re going to get something extraordinary.”

As Mr. Brooks put it, “I would dig myself into a hole, and Carl would not let me climb out.”

In 1960, the same year he and Mr. Brooks made their first album, Mr. Reiner wrote and starred in a pilot for a TV series, based on his own life, about a writer who works in New York for a larger-than-life, difficult-to-please comedian.

The show, “Head of the Family,” was not picked up. It became a series only when it was recast with Dick Van Dyke as the central character.

The workplace scenes in “The Dick Van Dyke Show” — featuring Morey Amsterdam and Rose Marie as Mr. Van Dyke’s fellow writers, with Mr. Reiner making occasional appearances as their boss, Alan Brady — were inspired by Mr. Reiner’s time with Sid Caesar (although Mr. Reiner insisted that his character was only partly based on Mr. Caesar). The domestic scenes, with Mary Tyler Moore as Mr. Van Dyke’s wife, were set in New Rochelle, N.Y., where Mr. Reiner lived at the time, and Ms. Moore’s character was modeled on his wife, Estelle. Mr. Reiner later attributed the show’s success to the choice of “somebody with more talent to play me.”

Seen on CBS from 1961 until 1966, “The Dick Van Dyke Show” won a total of 15 Primetime Emmy Awards for its cast and crew, five of them for Mr. Reiner as writer and producer. (He won nine Emmys in his career, including two for his on-camera work on “Caesar’s Hour,” one as a writer on a 1967 special that reunited the “Show of Shows” cast and one for a guest appearance, as Alan Brady, on an episode of the sitcom “Mad About You” in 1995.) It is widely regarded as one of the greatest sitcoms of all time.

Someone else once again played Mr. Reiner, or a character very much like him, on Broadway and in the movies. “Enter Laughing,” his autobiographical novel about a stage-struck delivery boy from the Bronx who decides to become an actor, was published in 1958 and adapted for the stage by Joseph Stein, another former member of the Caesar writing staff. With Alan Arkin in the lead role, it opened in 1963 and ran for more than 400 performances.

When “Enter Laughing” was sold to Hollywood, Mr. Reiner shared screenwriting credit with Mr. Stein for the 1967 film adaptation, starring Reni Santoni. It was Mr. Reiner’s third produced screenplay, after “The Thrill of It All” (1963) and “The Art of Love” (1965). More important, it was the first film he directed.

That same year he made his Broadway debut as a writer and director with “Something Different,” the story of a playwright suffering from writer’s block. It received generally good reviews (Walter Kerr of The New York Times praised Mr. Reiner’s “nifty habit of approaching a gag at high speed, passing it on the outside, and then noticing where it went in the rearview mirror”) and had a respectable three-month run. By that time, however, Mr. Reiner’s focus had shifted westward.

He had already appeared in a number of Hollywood movies by the time he and his family moved to Beverly Hills in the late 1960s, and he would continue to show up onscreen occasionally. But for the next three decades, most of his work in Hollywood was done behind the scenes.

From Actor to Director and Back

Carl Reiner was born in the Bronx on March 20, 1922, to Irving Reiner, a watchmaker, and Bessie (Mathias) Reiner. After graduating from Evander Childs High School in the Bronx, he went to work as a machinist’s helper and seemed headed for a career repairing sewing machines.

Then one day his older brother, Charlie, mentioned seeing a newspaper article about a free acting class being given by the Works Progress Administration, the New Deal jobs agency. Carl tried his hand at acting, found he was good at it, hung up his machinist’s apron and joined a theater troupe. He also acted in summer stock.

During World War II, Mr. Reiner served in an Army entertainment unit that toured American bases in the South Pacific. After his discharge he joined the road company of the musical revue “Call Me Mister” as the comic lead, and within a year he was in the Broadway production.

In the 1949-50 television season he was a regular on “The Fifty-Fourth Street Revue,” a variety series, and in 1950 he was back on Broadway in “Alive and Kicking,” where he caught the eye of Max Liebman, the mastermind of “Your Show of Shows.”

Mr. Reiner married Estelle Lebost in 1943. She died in 2008.

In addition to his daughter, an author and psychoanalyst, he is survived by his sons, Rob, known for directing “When Harry Met Sally,” “A Few Good Men,” “This Is Spinal Tap” and numerous other films and for his role as Archie Bunker’s son-in-law on the groundbreaking sitcom “All in the Family,” and Lucas, a painter and filmmaker; and five grandchildren.

Mr. Reiner’s first major box-office success as a director was “Oh, God!” (1977), starring George Burns as a very down-to-earth deity and John Denver as the man he chooses to spread his message. Two years later he teamed with Steve Martin, then at the height of his fame as a comedian, for what proved to be a mutually rewarding collaboration.

Mr. Reiner first directed Mr. Martin in “The Jerk” (1979), a film largely inspired by Mr. Martin’s manic stand-up act. The critical response was lukewarm, but the movie was a box-office smash and now often shows up on lists of the best American comedies.

“The Jerk,” “Dead Men Don’t Wear Plaid” (1982), “The Man With Two Brains” (1983) and “All of Me” (1984) defined Mr. Martin’s onscreen persona as a lovable goofball and made him a movie star. They also established Mr. Reiner as an imaginative director — especially “Dead Men Don’t Wear Plaid,” a black-and-white spoof of film noir set in the 1940s, in which he integrated vintage clips featuring actors like Humphrey Bogart and Barbara Stanwyck into the action.

Mr. Reiner returned to Broadway twice after moving west, but neither visit was triumphant. In 1972 he directed “Tough to Get Help,” a comedy by Steve Gordon about a black couple working in an ostensibly liberal white household, which was savaged by the critics and closed after one performance. In 1980 he staged “The Roast,” by Jerry Belson and Garry Marshall, two writers he had worked with on “The Dick Van Dyke Show.” That play, about a group of comedians who expose their darker instincts when they gather to roast a colleague, ran for less than a week

The movies he directed after he stopped working with Mr. Martin — among them “Summer Rental” (1985), with John Candy, and “Sibling Rivalry” (1990), with Kirstie Alley and Bill Pullman — did only somewhat better. In his 70s, he decided that filmmaking demanded “just too much energy.” He gave it up after making “That Old Feeling” (1997), with Bette Midler and Dennis Farina.

But he remained active in front of the camera, notably as a crook lured out of retirement by the prospect of sharing in the loot from a Las Vegas casino robbery in Steven Soderbergh’s 2001 remake of the Frank Sinatra caper film “Ocean’s Eleven.” He reprised the role in “Ocean’s Twelve” (2004) and “Ocean’s Thirteen” (2007).

On television he had recurring roles on the sitcoms “Hot in Cleveland” and “Two and a Half Men” and guest-starred on “Parks and Recreation,” “House” and other series. He also did voice-over work for several cartoon shows.

Mr. Reiner wrote a number of books in addition to “Enter Laughing,” including novels, children’s books and several memoirs, among them “My Anecdotal Life” (2003), “I Remember Me” (2013) and “Too Busy to Die” (2017). His daughter said another book would be published soon.

In 2017 he was prominently featured in “If You’re Not in the Obit, Eat Breakfast,” a documentary about people who remained active into their 90s. And in his last years he maintained an active Twitter account, which he used primarily for political commentary.

A photo showing Mr. Reiner, Mr. Brooks and Annie Reiner wearing “Black Lives Matter” T-shirts, taken on Mr. Brooks’s birthday, was posted on Twitter this week.

Toward the end of “I Remember Me,” Mr. Reiner said a friend of his had recently asked if he had thought about retiring. Noting that his role on “Hot in Cleveland” gave him “the opportunity to kiss Betty White — thrice — and on the lips,” he offered a succinct response:

“Retire? I may be old, but I am not crazy!”

https://www.nytimes.com/2020/06/30/arts/television/carl-reiner-dead.html
 

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Nielsen Overnights (Broadcast)
‘The Wall’ Viewership Hits Season High, ‘Cannonball’ Preview Stays Afloat
By Dino-Ray Ramos, Deadline.com - Jun. 30, 2020

NBC won Monday night with The Wall delivering a 0.7 rating in the adults 18-49 demographic and 3.99 million viewers, marking a season-high audience for the game show. The Titan Games ticked down in the demo with a 0.7 and 3.91 million viewers, but the reality sports competition and The Wall still managed to top the night. Meanwhile, the network gave audiences a splashy special preview of the wild game show Cannonball which delivered a 0.6 in the demo and 2.75 million viewers. The show official debuts on the USA Network on July 9.

ABC’s The Bachelor: The Greatest Seasons Ever (0.4, 2.10M) held steady with its episode that spotlighted JoJo Fletcher’s season of The Bachelorette.

The CW was steady across the board with new episodes of Whose Line Is It Anyway? (0.2, 1.07M) and Penn & Teller: Fool Us (0.2, 991,000).

Elsewhere, CBS populated its Monday night with reruns of The Neighborhood, Bob Hearts Abishola, All Rise and Bull and Fox served repeats of 9-1-1 and 9-1-1: Lone Star.

https://deadline.com/2020/06/the-wall-nbc-cannonball-monday-tv-ratings-1202973782/
 

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TV/Critic's Notes
Bianculli's Best Bets
By David Bianculli, TVWorthWatching.com - Jun. 30, 2020

POV: “AND SHE COULD BE NEXT: BUILDING THE MOVEMENT”
PBS, 9:00 p.m. ET
DOCUMENTARY MINISERIES PREMIERE:
This two-night nonfiction miniseries concludes tonight, profiling six women of color who rose from the grassroots to seek election in recent years. Subjects range from Stacey Abrams and Rashida Tlaib to Lucy McBath. Check local listings.

WELCOME TO CHECHNYA
HBO, 10:00 p.m. ET
DOCUMENTARY PREMIERE:
Filmmaker David France takes his camera into some unnervingly dangerous spots and conditions in this new documentary, which dares to document an ongoing pogrom in the repressive Russian republic. Chechnya’s ruler, Ramzan Kadyrov, has launched an anti-LGBTQ offensive since 2016, overseeing a government-backed campaign to identify, detain, torture and kill those “others.” The Kremlin hasn’t acted to protect them, but a sort of underground railroad of supporters has, and Welcome to Chechnya details efforts to escort them to safety ahead of the murderous forces seeking them out. France – the person, not the country – is there, with his often hidden cameras, at every harrowing step.


http://www.tvworthwatching.com/

* * * *

TV Review (Cable)
Climbing Everest and Tackling Climate Science — National Geographic Takes Viewers to the Top of the World
By Alex Strachan, TVWorthWatching.com's 'TV That Matters' - Jun. 30, 2020

Little more than a year ago, American mountain climber Don Cash died on Mt. Everest just hours after he had reached the summit.

Cash wasn't the first to die on Everest, and he won't be the last. What made Cash's death unique was that he was one of 200 people who climbed to the top of the world that day, and he was caught in a traffic jam on his way down. As Outside magazine later reported, when Cash and his Sherpa guides reached the Hillary Step, they had to wait their turn to the summit for more than two hours. The weather at that altitude is volatile and treacherous, and storms can sweep in a matter of minutes. A photo taken at the time by climber Nirmal Purja, showing a "conga line" of climbers, waiting their turn at 28,800 feet, went viral.

Why do it? Why go halfway around the world to climb the world's highest mountain, only to stand in line for hours at a time, as if lining up for groceries at the local supermarket in the middle of a pandemic.

The astounding beauty of the landscape, for one. That's one of the first things that jumps out in two engaging, eye-filling documentaries that premiere Tuesday on National Geographic Channel, Lost on Everest (9 p.m. ET), and Expedition Everest (10 p.m. ET).

Of the two, Expedition Everest is probably the more compelling, but they both have much to recommend.

Lost on Everest focuses on the mystery of Everest pioneer Andrew "Sandy" Irvine, George Mallory's climbing partner, who disappeared in 1924.

The second, very different, Expedition Everest, is the more topical and contemporary of the two. It follows a team of present-day climate scientists as they mount an expedition to install the world's highest weather station. "What makes one good day turn into someone else's bad day within 24 hours?" lead climber Pete Athans, a survivor of the tragic 1996 Into Thin Air expedition on Everest, asks early in the program. It's not an idle question.

Eight people died on the mountain that day in 1996, and accurate weather measurement at that altitude has taken on added urgency as more and more climbers, many of them neophytes and first-timers, take on Everest each climbing season.

Whether you've spent weeks battling cabin fever during COVID lockdown, or you're dealing with the heat and humidity of an early summer outdoors, the dark blue-black skies and white snows of Everest are a welcome sight — the NatGeo documentaries are crisp and sharp as a tack. Superlatives about drones and HD 4K camera technology are old news by now, but watching these programs really is like being there.

China/Tibet and Nepal both cancelled the brief climbing season on Everest — a tight, weeks-long window in May — this year, owing to the COVID-19 pandemic.

And while it may be hard to find too much sympathy for well-to-do high-altitude climbing tourists who think nothing of a mountaineering expedition halfway around the world, the effect on the local economies in Nepal and Tibet, where local families living on the margins rely on the annual climbing season to help clothe and feed themselves and their children year-round, has been devastating.

This is where these two programs are especially meaningful. They're about real, flesh-and-blood people, past and present, who tested themselves against the elements long before climbing Everest became a fad for the well-to-do. National Geographic is not a travel channel. Its focus is news and information. There's something truly amazing and awe-inspiring about accompanying climate scientists from the safety of home as the scientists crunch their way through ice and snow to tackle one of the defining issues of our times. It's entirely conceivable that whatever happens in our home towns during the climate crisis will be first spotted and identified at high altitude, just as climate science in the polar regions has taken on an added urgency in recent years.

TV documentaries are a dime-a-dozen these days, and many weigh in on the low end of the scale — low budget and made on the fly. Leave it to National Geographic, then, when holding a lens to the world's most famous and arguably awe-inspiring mountain to create two programs of real quality.

"The definition of adventure for me is the endeavor where the outcome is totally unknown," climber and writer Mark Synnot says at the outset of Lost on Everest — and outcomes don't get much more unknown than taking on the world's highest mountain in 1924, when Gore-Tex, HD television cameras, and GPS satellite technology were the stuff of science fiction.

Climbing legend George Mallory's story became clearer when his body was found on May 1, 1999 — except for one tantalizing question. Did he perish on his way down the mountain, after reaching the summit, or did he perish while making the final push? If the former, that would make Mallory the first known person to have reached the pinnacle of Chomolungma, Goddess Mother of the World.

"We are getting our first proper view of Mt. Everest," a near speechless expeditioner says early in Lost on Everest, "and it is absolutely off-the-hook spectacular, awe-inspiring, more than a little intimidating."

Moments later, the climbers' attitudes have changed.

"I know I'm not dying," one says, deadpan. "Because I desire coffee so badly."

Lost on Everest is about wonder, mystery, the human urge to explore, and the will to survive. Expedition Everest is more about science and answering the existential questions that face humanity in the near, not-too-distant future.

Expedition Everest holds its lens against the geology of the Himalaya region and explains how the world's tallest mountain region generates river water for some of the most populated nations and regions on the planet. If the glacial ice melts on the Himalayan mountains, entire areas face drought and likely starvation. This is powerful, bracing stuff, and poses some of the most existential questions facing humankind today.

"The simplicity of life becomes much more forward," a veteran climber says, early in Expedition Everest.

Climate science at high altitude, he says, is "the new Terra incognita… We just don't know."

As National Geographic points out in this fascinating, at-times enthralling program, we may be about to find out.

http://www.tvworthwatching.com/BlogPostDetails.aspx?postId=20277
 

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TV Notes (Streaming)
Netflix announces Ozark to end with two-part final season
By Derek Lawrence, EW.com - Jun. 30, 2020

Things are about to get even darker for Ozark fans.

Netflix announced Tuesday that the hit series, which became more popular than ever with the well-timed March release of season 3, has been renewed for a fourth and final season. But the Byrde family will hang around a little longer than usual, considering the concluding run will be expanded to 14 episodes (as opposed to the usual 10) and be split in two parts (seven and seven). The streamer didn't reveal a premiere date for the new episodes.

"We're so happy Netflix recognized the importance of giving Ozark more time to end the Byrdes' saga right," showrunner Chris Mundy said in a statement. "It's been such a great adventure for all of us — both on screen and off — so we're thrilled to get the chance to bring it home in the most fulfilling way possible."

Added star-director-producer Jason Bateman: “A super sized season means super sized problems for the Byrdes. I’m excited to end with a bang(s).”

Following the growing criminal enterprise of Chicago transplants Marty (Bateman) and Wendy Byrde (Laura Linney), Ozark has garnered awards recognition in front and behind the camera, with Bateman previously taking home the Emmy for Outstanding Directing, while Julia Garner scored an Outstanding Supporting Actress trophy.

Speaking to EW about all of season 3, including the bloody final scene, Mundy teased what a then-hypothetical fourth season would look like.

"If we're lucky enough to get a season 4, I think it will be about whether or not Ruth (Garner) really can create something of her own that she wants and is sustainable, or if she wants something else," he shared. "And I think it will be about if the Byrdes can they turn the biggest mistake of their lives into this huge advantage, and how much will karma catch up with them if they do?"

https://ew.com/tv/ozark-renewed-final-season/
 

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Obituary
Carl Reiner, Multifaceted Master of Comedy, Is Dead at 98
By Robert Berkvist and Peter Keepnews, The New York Times - Jun. 30, 2020
There goes another Mad Worlder.
He was the tower controller in the "mr howell" plane scene.

Looks like only 2 left:
Nicholas Georgiade - detective with "mr roper" at the just went sailing right out there crash.
Barrie Chase - sylvesters bikini dancer.
 
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Media/Business Notes
WarnerMedia To Sell CNN Atlanta Headquarters As Parent AT&T Seeks To Slash Debt
By Jill Goldsmith, Deadline.com - Jun. 29, 2020

WarnerMedia plans to sell the historic CNN Center in downtown Atlanta
Jill's idea of what downtown is is very large. From the CNN center you can see downtown Atlanta. It is part of a big hotel and business complex and right across the street from the convention center. It most certainly is not downtown.
 

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Jill's idea of what downtown is is very large. From the CNN center you can see downtown Atlanta. It is part of a big hotel and business complex and right across the street from the convention center. It most certainly is not downtown.
Actually that area is considered Downtown. The area you are talking about you can see from the CNN center is called Midtown.
 

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Actually that area is considered Downtown. The area you are talking about you can see from the CNN center is called Midtown.
Wow, that is a very large area for a downtown. That even includes the Olympic park that I also walked to. The lighted fountains were neat, but not as neat as they should have been because so many of the lights were burnt out. I found out that bulbs were replaced at scheduled dates in order to spread to cost of doing so. Hopefully they've converted to led lighting to save all kinds of costs.

I was there many, many, years ago for work at the convention center (10 days). I never got a chance to turn CNN because it opened after had to start work and closed at 5pm, long before i was done for the day. The closest I got was while eating at the large food court.
 

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There goes another Mad Worlder.
He was the tower controller in the "mr howell" plane scene.

Looks like only 2 left:
Nicholas Georgiade - detective with "mr roper" at the just went sailing right out there crash.
Barrie Chase - sylvesters bikini dancer.
You can't imagine how proud of you I am. Thanks for keeping track.
 

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Yeah that's Atlanta in a nutshell.


You can't imagine how proud of you I am. Thanks for keeping track.
Well i mean there could be others with small parts too like that little kid that sank phil silvers car in the river.

Oh & your wife said she was proud too. :)
 

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Well i mean there could be others with small parts too like that little kid that sank phil silvers car in the river.
That was child actor Eddie Rosson, who died in 1994 of liver failure. There may still be a couple of nonspeakers left, as you say.
 
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