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Business Notes
Comcast reaches peace accord with CBS, ABC and Fox stations

By Joe Flint, Los Angeles Times' 'Company Town' Blog


Comcast Corp. told the Federal Communications Commission it has reached an agreement with television stations owned by Fox, CBS and ABC that it hopes will ease concerns about the cable company's proposed marriage with NBC Universal.


Local stations, particularly those owned by rivals of NBC and its affiliates have expressed concern about being at a disadvantage if Comcast, the nation's biggest cable operator owns NBC.


The big concern is what a Comcast-NBC merger would mean when it comes to negotiating deals to carry stations of rival networks on Comcast cable systems. Comcast pledged it would engage in good-faith negotiations and "not discriminate in its retransmission consent negotiations with the non-NBCU Stations on the basis of affiliation (or lack thereof) with Comcast or the NBC or Telemundo Television Networks."


Interestingly, at the same time television station owners want Comcast to agree to conditions on so-called retransmission consent negotiations; the broadcast industry is telling the FCC that it does not need to regulate this area of the industry. In other words, TV stations want the FCC to put conditions about retransmission consent into any approval of the Comcast-NBC deal while at the same time does not want the FCC to exercise any regulatory muscle over retransmission consent.


There have been several big fights between broadcasters and cable operators over the last year over retransmission consent including one between Time Warner Cable and Fox and another between Cablevision and Walt Disney Co.'s ABC. Later this summer, Time Warner Cable is expected to face off in a testy battle with ABC as well.


Just how much teeth any of these agreements Comcast has reached with television station owners and others concerned about the effect the merger will have on the rest of the media industry remains to be seen. One television industry publication, TV NewsCheck, argues it is a lot of lip service that won't hold up once the deal closes.

http://latimesblogs.latimes.com/ente...-stations.html
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Riverside_Guy /forum/post/18859639


...


I also wonder, do they rotate those [Nielsen] folks (and how frequently)?

Well, if you know your sample group is a good representation of your demographics model then it doesn't really matter, but I can't see how Neilsen can back up any of their predictions, because (to the best of my knowledge) they don't have any kind of feedback as to how good or bad their demographic models are.


By contrast, in political polling, there's eventually an actual election with exiting polling and you get all kinds of feedback about the accuracy of your demo and turnout and crossovers models and all that other junk. And yet they still have instances where the real result is well outside of their theoretical error range.


OTOH, it doesn't really matter, right? The only reason Neilsen exists is because the broadcasters and the advertisers needed some kind of mutually agreeable method to place a monetary value on different time slots. It doesn't really matter if the method is completely phony as long as both sides find it acceptable.


However, what does surprise me is that the advertisers put up with the sweeps week BS. I would have thought that they'd refuse to accept numbers that obviously came from an attempt to game the system, but they seem to be perfectly happy with being gamed.
 

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Critic's Notes
Reality show hosts are the real survivors
'The Bachelorette's' Chris Harrison, 'Survivor's' Jeff Probst, 'American Idol's' Ryan Seacrest and Cat Deeley of 'So You Think You Can Dance' steer their shows to success with wisdom and humor

By Joe Caraminca, Los Angeles Times - July 4th, 2010


"Can I play armchair psychiatrist for a second?" Chris Harrison asked the current Bachelorette, Ali Fedotowsky, on an episode of the ABC show last month.


Please do, Chris.


He's been doing a quietly fantastic job at just that for years now, slowly evolving his role from the show's majordomo to its emotional calibrator. Once, he grinned awkwardly in cheapish suits and made sure the roses found homes. Now he's the show's conscience, its authority figure, and with his steady mien, one of the most consistently trustworthy presences on television in the last decade.


And he's not the only one: With little fanfare, the reality show host has become modern television's central figure. Often overlooked in favor of the shows' participants, and just as often maligned for performing what can appear to be an empty task, the host is actually a surefooted guide to the genre.


The rise of reality has become the medium's dominant narrative, but the genre remains unloved, the poorer cousin of scripted programming. As a result, it's still pleasantly enigmatic, its charms only sometimes appreciated by outsiders.


Great hosts are an entryway and a bridge. Over the last decade, four in particular have grown into compelling figures in their own right Harrison since 2002 on "The Bachelor" (and later, of course, "The Bachelorette"); Jeff Probst since 2000 on "Survivor"; Ryan Seacrest since 2002 on "American Idol"; and Cat Deeley since 2005 on "So You Think You Can Dance."


Each has been key to the success of his or her show, largely by shaking the role of the host free of its game-show heritage. They're not passive question-askers and plastic grinners, but increasingly the dungeon masters controlling the action. Furthermore, they've become advocates, not necessarily in supporting specific contestants the appearance of impartiality still matters but in nudging participants closer to speaking the truth.


Probst, especially, has this gift. Twenty seasons in on "Survivor," and he's only gotten tougher. His tribal council interrogations are devastating without being leading, and his disdain for lazy competitors is barely masked. Even the way he lowers his hand to signal the start of a challenge has become loaded with meaning, its casualness not an indictment of the process so much as an acknowledgment that the beginning of a competition is really the least relevant moment on the show. The conversations, the strategy: that's where he shines.


In recent years, that's become Harrison's strength as well, particularly as "The Bachelor" has grown into a meta-reality phenomenon, operating on many levels simultaneously: on screen, in real life, in the tabloids. When these modes overlap such as when a producer was found to have gotten intimate with a contestant last season Harrison has been firm about rebuilding the walls.


Probst and Harrison have taken to writing long, searching, insidery blog posts after each episode, helping them establish a moral authority above and beyond their shows. Thanks to them, the episode that airs on television is no longer the final word: they've taken it back for themselves.


With narratives as complex as those on "Survivor" and "The Bachelor," some sort of human filter can be helpful, but on more conventional competition shows, it would seem superfluous. Still, the development of Seacrest from a harmless nub of an announcer to the linchpin of "American Idol" has proven instructive. Over the last three seasons especially, he's emerged as one of the feistiest voices on television, possibly in anticipation of the day, now arrived, when Simon Cowell would depart the show and Seacrest would be left as its most famous personality.


He's chatty and tart, and sometimes outright dismissive, adding much needed seasoning to "Idol," which has been suffering under the weight of its importance of late. Seacrest, alone among this group, also has numerous other high-profile business ventures. That's nice, but none of those things would be possible without the confidence he's earned over nine years of "Idol," and, as a result, Seacrest will stay relevant long after "The X Factor" swallows "Idol" whole.


In 2008, the Emmys introduced the category Outstanding Host for a Reality or Reality Competition Program, then promptly fumbled it by having the five nominees Probst, Seacrest, Tom Bergeron of " Dancing With the Stars," Howie Mandel of "Deal or No Deal" and Heidi Klum of "Project Runway" co-host the show, with miserable results.


Probst has won the Emmy both times it's been handed out fair enough. (Certainly more fair than the inexplicable seven-year stranglehold "The Amazing Race" has on the Outstanding Reality Competition Program.) But any of these four could rightly snatch the title from him.


Even less-evolved hosts are finding wiggle room in their jobs. Julie Chen of "Big Brother" has shown flashes of feistiness in recent seasons. Even bone-dry T.J. Lavin, now on what feels like his 100th season hosting the "Real World/Road Rules Challenge," has grown a bit testy with age, arching his eyebrows and chastising competitors who don't live up to the show's code of implied decency.


In her first couple of seasons on "So You Think You Can Dance," Deeley figured to remain one of these minor hosts, unlikely to be much more than a model with a microphone. Like the show's executive producer, Nigel Lythgoe, she was a British import, but Cowell had paved the way for a tough Brit to stand in judgment of American talent. Until Deeley, there was no strong precedent for a Brit to be the one to gently guide and nurture.


Of the four Seacrest, Probst, Harrison and Deeley her job requires the least, but she's invested even that with a dignity and flair that dozens of others on lesser shows can't muster. And over the last three years, she's grown exponentially. Now, she's an encourager, a ham, an approachable sex symbol, a shoulder to cry on. And most importantly: an anchor.

http://www.latimes.com/entertainment...,4991126.story
 

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On The Air Tonight
Sunday Network Prime-Time Programming Options
(All shows are in HD unless noted as being in Standard Definition: SD)


(Reminder: If you are recording these programs, check your network listings for precise start/end times. For PBS, please double check your local listings.)

ABC:
7 America’s Funniest Home Videos (R, January 17)
8 Extreme Makeover: Home Ed ition (R, March 21)
9 Jimmy Kimmel Live: Jimmy Kimmel Live's Twilight Saga: Total Eclipse of the Heart. Actors Robert Pattinson, Kristen Stewart, Taylor Lautner, Dakota Fanning, Bryce Howard and Xavier Samuel (``The Twilight Saga: Eclipse''). (R, June 23)
10 The Gates (R, pilot, June 20)

CBS:
7 60 Minutes Presents: Into the Wild. Threats to the great wildebeest migration in Kenya; researchers try to decode the language of elephants; famed dinosaur hunter Jack Horner shakes up the world of paleontology.
8 I Get That A Lot (R, May 19)
9 Cold Case (R, December 13)
10 The Boston Pops Fireworks Spectacular. Craig Ferguson hosts the annual ceremony that presents fireworks accompanied by the music of the Boston Pops Esplanade Orchestra; Toby Keith performs.

Fox:

7
Sons of Tuscon
7:30 American Dad (R, October 11)
8 The Simpsons (R, April 11)
8:30 The Cleveland Show (R, November 22)
9 Family Guy (R, November 8) SD
9:30 Family Guy (R, January 3) SD

NBC:
7 Dateline NBC (two hours)
9 The Macy's 4th of July Fireworks Spectacular. Fireworks explode over New York; Justin Bieber, Enrique Iglesias and LeAnn Rimes perform; appearances by cast members of ``The Twilight Saga: Eclipse''; Nick Cannon and Alison Sweeney host.
10 Law & Order: Criminal Intent (R, from USA Network, April 27)

PBS:

8 A Capitol Fourth. The 2010 concert celebrating America marks its 30th anniversary; performers include Reba McEntire, Darius Rucker, John Schneider, and pianist Lang Lang; host Jimmy Smits. (90 minutes repeated at 9:30)
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mac The Knife /forum/post/18859992


By contrast, in political polling, there's eventually an actual election with exiting polling and you get all kinds of feedback about the accuracy of your demo and turnout and crossovers models and all that other junk. And yet they still have instances where the real result is well outside of their theoretical error range.

Not really. The problem with political polling is that you're sampling everyone but you don't know who's actually going to end up voting. Thus, most of the variation between polling data and voting results stems from efforts by pollsters to exclude individuals who are unlikely to vote. If everyone was compelled to vote, then polling would be an extremely accurate predictor of election results, unless the sample was for some reason screwed up (e.g. by landline phone bias).


Nielson doesn't have to deal with any of the problems that plague political polling. All it has to do is build a genuine random sample sufficiently stratified to cull the data that advertisers want to know. In a country of 300 million people, where 90-some percent watch television on a daily basis, this should be incredibly easy to do.
 

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ABC Channel 13 in Houston Texas will air "Freedom Over Texas", a concert and fireworks display show, on Sunday at 7:00 PM CT and delay network programming until later at night.
 

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Critic's Notes
On The Air Tonight
By Kathryn Shattuck, The New York Times, July 4, 2010

10 A.M. (ABC) THIS WEEK Senator John McCain, Republican of Arizona, discusses the transition of American military leadership in Afghanistan to Gen. David H. Petraeus. Senator Joseph I. Lieberman, Independent of Connecticut, continues the discussion on Fox News Sunday at 10; and Senator Lindsey Graham, Republican of South Carolina, is interviewed from Afghanistan on Face the Nation, at 10:30 on CBS.

8 P.M. (TCM) THE ESSENTIALS JR. In this screening for the younger set, John Lithgow explains the pop-culture significance the Birdie Dance, anyone? of Bye Bye Birdie (1963), the George Sidney frolic. The movie was adapted from the Broadway musical inspired by the 1958 induction of Elvis Presley into the Army, about a rock 'n' roll idol (Jesse Pearson) who is drafted and bestows a farewell kiss on a small town girl (Ann-Margret) from Ohio. Bobby Rydell plays her jealous boyfriend; Dick Van **** and Janet Leigh are New York songwriters trying to get their own romance off the ground; Ed Sullivan appears as himself.

8 P.M. (Ovation) THE CONVERSATION (1974) Gene Hackman plays Harry Caul, a surveillance expert and paranoid loner who has been hired to eavesdrop on a married woman (Cindy Williams) and her lover (Frederic Forrest) by a suspicious husband known as the Director (Robert Duvall). (A young Harrison Ford portrays the Director's assistant.) But three people have already died because of Harry's work. Now he's worried that two more may soon lose their lives as well. The movie earned three Oscar nominations, including best picture and best original screenplay for its director and writer, Francis Ford Coppola, who won for best director, best picture and best adapted screenplay for The Godfather: Part II that same year. Writing in The New York Times, Vincent Canby called The Conversation haunting and bothersome: Haunting because its suggestion that technology has gotten out of hand, though not exactly new, is so convincingly and fastidiously detailed. It's bothersome because Mr. Coppola, the writer as well as the director, has nearly succeeded in making a great film but has, instead, made one that is merely very good. Worth a listen: David Shire's evocative score for solo piano.

8 P.M. (PBS) A CAPITOL FOURTH (2010) Jimmy Smits returns as host of this 30th annual concert on the West Lawn of the United States Capitol, which will feature hits and patriotic classics performed by Gladys Knight, Reba McEntire, Darius Rucker, David Archuleta, John Schneider and the classical pianist Lang Lang with the National Symphony Orchestra under the baton of Jack Everly. Ms. McEntire will be presented with the National Artistic Achievement Award; the ceremony will also pay tribute to the conductor Erich Kunzel, who died in 2009, and had conducted A Capitol Fourth and the National Memorial Day Concert for two decades. The evening will end with Tchaikovsky's 1812 Overture, accompanied by cannon fire from the United States Army Presidential Salute Battery.

9 P.M. (NBC) MACY'S FOURTH OF JULY FIREWORKS SPECTACULAR Justin Bieber, Enrique Iglesias and LeAnn Rimes will perform alongside cast members of the recently opened film The Twilight Saga: Eclipse in this 34th annual spectacle, in which 40,000 shells about 1,500 a minute are scheduled to explode from six barges on the Hudson River. Nick Cannon and Alison Sweeney are hosts of the special, broadcast live from aboard the 4,100-passenger Norwegian Epic cruise ship, which was christened on Friday.

9 P.M. (VH1) BEHIND THE MUSIC: JENNIFER LOPEZ Ms. Lopez muses on her strict Bronx upbringing by a mother who urged her three daughters to be independent; her show business start as a Fly Girl on Fox's In Living Color; her star turn in the feature film Selena; her relationship with Ben Affleck, which gave rise to the term Bennifer; what happened the night guns were drawn while she and Sean Combs, her boyfriend at that time, partied at a New York City club in 1999; and her marriage to Marc Anthony, with whom she has twins. Oh and what she really thought about the controversial dress slit down to there and up to here that she wore to the 2000 Grammy Awards.

10 P.M. (CBS) THE BOSTON POPS FIREWORKS SPECTACULAR The relentlessly patriotic country crooner Toby Keith (Courtesy of the Red, White and Blue) will join the Boston Pops Orchestra, under the direction of Keith Lockhart, on the banks of the Charles River. Craig Ferguson returns as host.

http://www.nytimes.com/ref/arts/tele...ref=television
 

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On The Air Tonight:
On Tonight: Fireworks, catfights and 'Rebel Monkeys'
By Jayme Deerwester, USA TODAY
(All times are Eastern)


Even as you read this, sweaty hordes are swarming popular fireworks viewing spots to claim the patch of grass from which they will ooh and ahh. But if you're more the misanthropic sort, you might consider enjoying these TV specials and marathons in air-conditioned, solitary splendor:

Boom!

A Capitol Fourth (PBS, 8 p.m. ET/PT) Jimmy Smits hosts this year's concert on the National Mall, featuring American Idolalumnus David Archuleta, Blowfish-turned-country star Darius Rucker, Gladys Knight and Reba McEntire. Dukes of Hazzard actor and country singer John Schneider will be there, too, but the Park Police wouldn't authorize parking for the General Lee.

DETAILS: What to expect from 'A Capitol Fourth'

Macy's 4th of July Fireworks Spectacular (NBC, 9 p.m. ET/PT) Nick Cannon and Alison Sweeney host this year's fireworks fest over the New York skyline. This one's targeted at the tweens — Justin Bieber and the Twilight cast are on the bill.

The Boston Pops Fireworks Spectacular (CBS, 10 p.m. ET/PT) The pyrotechnical party continues on up the Northeast corridor to Beantown, where the city's famed orchestra supplies the John Philip Sousa soundtrack.

Time with the (dysfunctional) family

Bethenny Getting Married; Real Housewives of New Jersey. (Bravo, 1-7 p.m ET/PT) On this day of national pride, Bravo counter-programs with a six-hour reminder of why some folks hate America.

Star Wars Marathon (Spike, 9 a.m.- 3 a.m. ET/PT) All six chapters of the Skywalker saga. Spike is being kind enough to save the original trilogy until after you've kicked your barbecue guests out.

Oh Say Can You OC Marathon (Soap, 3-7 p.m. ET/PT) Celebrate Chrismukkah in July with the Cohens and Coopers.

Run's House (Style, noon-4 p.m. ET/PT; 11 p.m.-3 a.m. ET/PT) Spend the holiday at the Run-DMC rapper's Saddle Ridge, N.J. manor.

Lock and load, boys!

Cops (G4, 2:30 p.m — 6:30 p.m. ET/PT) Police are called to deal with people taking liberties that the founding fathers most certainly did not fight for.

Top Shot (History, 8 p.m. — 4 a.m. ET/PT) The country's top marksmen and women compete for bragging rights. The holiday timing for this marathon is just begging for an an all-musket edition, don't you think?

NCIS (USA, 11 a.m. — 11 p.m. ET/PT) Jethro Gibbs, his Goth lab geek Abby and the rest of the crew support the troops by probing crimes committed by and against members of the military.

Creatures, great and small-minded (and tasty, too)

Life (Animal Planet, noon — 6 a.m. ET/PT) The BBC-Discovery nature series comes out of hibernation for an encore. It kicks off with "Challenges of Life," showcasing how various species feed, hunt, court and parent. Even though most of the stars walk on all fours, they're bound to be more civilized than The Real Housewives of New Jersey.

Anthony Bourdain: No Reservations (Travel, 2 p.m. — 12 a.m. ET/PT) Bourdain chows down around the globe. Given his adventurous palate, it's not unreasonable to expect he'll be dining on some of those critters from Life.

Bridezillas (WE, 5 p.m. — 11 p.m. ET/PT) Encountering entitled, bratty brides-to-be in their natural habitat. Can they be tamed?

Rebel Monkeys (National Geographic Wild, 4 p.m.- 4 a.m. ET/PT) It examines the lives of privileged primates who live at the Galta Temple in Jaipur, India. When worshippers can't afford to feed them anymore because of a famine, they have to forage for themselves. It's what would happen if Meerkat Manor mated with You're Cut Off.

http://www.usatoday.com/life/televis...v-sunday_N.htm
 

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Today's HD TV Sports Schedule
(All times are Eastern)

Tennis
Wimbledon, men's singles and mixed doubles finals, NBC, 9 a.m.

Golf
PGA European Tour, French Open, final round, Golf Channel, 8 a.m.
PGA Tour, AT&T National, final round, Golf Channel, noon; CBS, 2
Champions Tour, Montreal Championship, final round, same-day tape, Golf Channel, 7

Major League Baseball
All-Star Game Selection Show, in Atlanta, TBS, noon
Toronto at New York Yankees, TBS, 1
Cincinnati at Chicago Cubs, WGN, 2:10
Kansas City at Los Angeles Angels, ESPN, 8

Motor sports
MotoGP World Championship, Catalunyan Grand Prix, in Barcelona, Speed, 8 a.m.
Izod IndyCar Series, Camping World Grand Prix, in Watkins Glen, N.Y., ABC, 3:30
MotoGP Moto2, Catalunyan Grand Prix, in Barcelona, same-day tape, Speed, 5

Cycling
Tour de France, Stage 1, Rotterdam, Netherlands, to Brussels, Versus, 8:30 a.m.

Major League Soccer
Seattle at Los Angeles, ESPN2, 10:30

Australian Rules Football
Richmond at Sydney, delayed tape, ESPN2, 2 a.m.

http://www.usatoday.com/sports/tv.htm
 

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Some July Fourth TV Highlights
From the Los Angeles Times’ “Show Tracker” blog

Note: All times are generally ET/PT, but check your local listings.)

SERIES

Behind the Music: Jennifer Lopez is profiled in this new edition of the celebrity bio series (9 p.m. VH1).

SPECIALS

A Capitol Fourth (2010): Jimmy Smits hosts the festivities in Washington D.C., with musical guests Reba McEntire, Darius Rucker, John Schneider and classical pianist Lang Lang (8 and 9:30 p.m. PBS).

The Macy's 4th of July Fireworks Spectacular: Nick Cannon and Alison Sweeney host, with musical guests Justin Bieber, Enrique Iglesias and LeAnn Rimes (9 p.m. NBC).

The Boston Pops Fireworks Spectacular: Craig Ferguson hosts, with musical performances by the Boston Pops Esplanade Orchestra and country music's Toby Keith (10 p.m. CBS).

MOVIES

Lord of War: Nicolas Cage portrays an international arms dealer in this darkly comic 2005 drama (7:55 p.m. IFC).

Agent Cody Banks: “Malcolm in the Middle's” Frankie Muniz stars in this kid-friendly 2003 spy tale (8 p.m. KTLA).

Jaws: Roy Scheider, Richard Dreyfus and Robert Shaw star in director Steven Spielberg's 1975 shark thriller (8 p.m. Encore).

The General: Buster Keaton stars in the thrilling 1927 silent film. (9:30 p.m. Turner Classic Movies).
http://latimesblogs.latimes.com/show...al-on-tcm.html
 

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ABC Takes Surprising A18-49 Lead in 2010 July Sweep; CBS First in P2+


Over the past five summers, FOX has led the broadcast networks in A18-49s for five consecutive July Sweep measurement periods, but that could be changing this summer, as ABC has moved into the lead and is angling for an upset. ABC sports a 1.45 A18-49 average in the first two days of the Sweep, well ahead of second place FOX with 1.20. In P2+ viewers, CBS leads with two victories to date and a 6,035,000 P2+ average, while ABC sits in second.


Also surprising development is an apparent growth in numbers year-over-year for broadcast, with the 5-net A18-49 count up +16% and the P2+ viewership up +5%.

     nightsnights
demodemodemodemo%wonwon
Rankweb20102009chg20102009
1ABC1.450.7593%1 
2FOX1.201.30-8% 1
3CBS1.101.20-8%  
3NBC1.101.055%1 
5CW0.500.3160%  
naUNI*0.000.00#### 1
 total5.354.6116%22
     nightsnights
P2+viewersviewersviewersviewerswonwon
rankweb20102009chg20102009
1CBS6.0356.420-6%22
2ABC5.2152.610100%  
3FOX3.4504.845-29%  
4NBC3.3353.545-6%  
5CW1.1820.89532%  
naUNI*0.0000.000######  
 total19.21718.3155%22
* No data available yet.


'Friday Night Lights' is sure finding its kicking leg this season, having got its fifth 1st-place finish in A18-49s last night. The season four averages after 9 episodes are 2.4HH/5%, 1.08 A18-49 (1,437,692 A18-49s), 3,669,222 P2+ viewers. These season four A18-49 time period wins are all the more remarkable in that the series didn't have a single A18-49 win in its first three seasons.
 

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Further tea leaves begging to be read that signal to me that "Law & Order: Criminal Intent" is about to be canceled. Today (July 4th) USA Network is airing an all-new episode, "Inhumane Society," at 8AM (already shown) and 11PM ET/PT. And tomorrow, July 5th, USA will be airing during its 2010 "CI" marathon at 4PM ET/PT the brand-new episode "Three-in-One" that will officially 'premiere' the next day (July 6th) in its normal 10PM time slot. Why would USA dump a new episode on the 4th of July weekend and preview its Tuesday episode on Monday in the middle of an afternoon repeat block unless it plans to get rid of it?


"CI" is dead!
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by foxeng /forum/post/18858526


WOW! The wipes and graphics were complicated, for the time. Compared to today, really elementary. And all done in analog to boot! Only the networks and major market stations could afford that kind of stuff back then. You have more horsepower than that in Master Control on air squeeze back graphics these days.


Good stuff though! Brings back great memories. Back when TV was fun and right before the bean counters got involved.

+1 on the bean counters. But the effects were digital. My guess is an Ampex ADO was used for the perspective spins as that was the popular box at the time which created quality video. They went for around $200K per channel. The Quantel DPE-5000 did some nice tricks but it kind of mutilated the video with artifacts. It was an all composite analog environment externally in those days, so decoding to component and re-encoding to composite was required internally. Amazing that inexpensive software can do more in HD now on mainstream hardware.


BTW I looked at Ampex's site and noticed on their timeline of achievements that they mention the 1988 introduction of D2, but show a picture of an English made Rank Cintel telecine. Ooops!
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by URFloorMatt /forum/post/18861149


Nielson doesn't have to deal with any of the problems that plague political polling. All it has to do is build a genuine random sample sufficiently stratified to cull the data that advertisers want to know. In a country of 300 million people, where 90-some percent watch television on a daily basis, this should be incredibly easy to do.

But do the viewing habits of Nielsen's sample mirror that of the entire viewing population? How do they know? As scientifically valid as their sample structure might be, they have no way of validating the sample. As the content of television changes year by year, so will the viewing habits of the nation's viewers. With no means of sample validation, the poll results are questionable, at best.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by dad1153 /forum/post/18862513


Further tea leaves begging to be read that signal to me that "Law & Order: Criminal Intent" is about to be canceled. Today (July 4th) USA Network is airing an all-new episode, "Inhumane Society," at 8AM (already shown) and 11PM ET/PT. And tomorrow, July 5th, USA will be airing during its 2010 "CI" marathon at 4PM ET/PT the brand-new episode "Three-in-One" that will officially 'premiere' the next day (July 6th) in its normal 10PM time slot. Why would USA dump a new episode on the 4th of July weekend and preview its Tuesday episode on Monday in the middle of an afternoon repeat block unless it plans to get rid of it?

Because fewer people are at home on a holiday 3-day weekend?


BTW, where do you get this information? I can't find any online verification of this schedule, including on USA's own schedule at either of these sites:

http://www.usanetwork.com/schedules/...sdate=7/4/2010
http://www.usanetwork.com/schedules/...sdate=7/5/2010
 

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Saturday’s fast affiliate overnight prime-time ratings (which include the total viewers and 18-49 demographic estimates in every half hour) have been posted near the top of Ratings News, the second post in this thread.

http://www.avsforum.com/avs-vb/showt...post10367387
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by domino92024 /forum/post/18862561


But do the viewing habits of Nielsen's sample mirror that of the entire viewing population? How do they know? As scientifically valid as their sample structure might be, they have no way of validating the sample. As the content of television changes year by year, so will the viewing habits of the nation's viewers. With no means of sample validation, the poll results are questionable, at best.

As long as the sample is random, of course it does. That's the very nature of random sampling.


Like I've said before, Nielson's categories are so broad (wide age brackets, wide income brackets, and gender), and the U.S. audience so large (nearly 300 million potential participants), that the kind of sampling Nielson does should be highly accurate.


The only times it might be inaccurate would be unusual subpopulations, like 18-25 year olds with income over $100,000. But that subpopulation itself is surely so small, it's influence on television viewing should be minuscule. And I don't believe that advertisers generally seek that information from subpopulations of subpopulations. They're perfectly happy to know that a certain show does well among 18-25 year olds and also among families with incomes over $100,000.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by domino92024 /forum/post/18862626


BTW, where do you get this information? I can't find any online verification of this schedule, including on USA's own schedule at either of these sites:

http://www.usanetwork.com/schedules/...sdate=7/4/2010
http://www.usanetwork.com/schedules/...sdate=7/5/2010

My TWC HD DVR's schedule guide, which updated itself overnight (I happened to be watching Segal's "Above The Law" on Blu-ray when I saw the box update itself with the new info). I really, really hope it's wrong.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by fredfa /forum/post/18862713


Saturday’s fast affiliate overnight prime-time ratings (which include the total viewers and 18-49 demographic estimates in every half hour) have been posted near the top of Ratings News, the second post in this thread: http://www.avsforum.com/avs-vb/showt...post10367387

Does Marc Berman (and/or Fred for that matter) ever sleep or take a day off? I mean, ratings data for a worthless Saturday schedule on the 4th of July in the middle of a four-day holiday weekend? Now that's service above-and-beyond the call of duty and with a smile to boot. Thanks guys!
 

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TV-on-DVD
'Law & Order - UK'
Same Kind of Crime, Different Accent

By Mike Hale, The New York Times - July 4th, 2010


Pity the “Law & Order” purist. Now that the mother ship has been canceled after 20 seasons, what are you supposed to do if “SVU” leaves you cold, “Criminal Intent” bores you, and the thought of this fall’s “Law & Order: Los Angeles” scares the hell out of you? If only the real thing will do — and if you’ve seen every rerun on TNT and USA at least twice — there is still one place to turn.


It’s a place where the people are represented by two separate yet equally important groups: the police who investigate the crime and the Crown Prosecutors who prosecute the offenders. It’s called London, and it’s the setting of “Law & Order: UK,” the “L&O” spinoff that remains most faithful to the original show.


Perhaps “faithful” is an understatement. To some extent “Law & Order: UK” is the original show, with British accents and detective superintendents rather than captains or lieutenants. Through its first 13 episodes on the British network ITV, the series has based each of its stories on an episode drawn from the first seven seasons of the American “Law & Order,” changing details but staying true to the outlines of the case and its resolution, and keeping the famous sound cue between scenes. (Other European spinoffs use a similar strategy but with different models: the French version draws on “Law & Order: Criminal Intent” and the Russian on “Law & Order: SVU.”)


The British series has not been broadcast in the United States, but a DVD of the first season (shown in two chunks in Britain, in 2009 and 2010) is available through Target; it’s currently on sale at target.com for $29.99 ( http://www.target.com/s/191-5281679-...1&searchPage=1 ). Some Americans who live close enough to the Canadian border can also see it on the Canadian network Citytv. The show has been a hit in Britain, averaging more than six million viewers, and a large part of that can be attributed to good bones. It’s hard to go wrong when hand-picking scripts from the early seasons of “Law & Order.”


For an American fan, watching those scripts relocated to the Old Bailey and the banks of the Thames is an experience both familiar and disorienting. The British team, led by the writer and producer Chris Chibnall (“Torchwood,” “Life on Mars”), has done a frighteningly thorough job of replicating the pace, rhythm and look of the original. Inveterate rerun watchers familiar with the American episodes in question will notice, however, that the ambience the British show captures is that of the latter-day “Law & Order,” more brightly colored and theatrical than the relatively somber, low-key early seasons.


A head-to-head comparison of American and British episodes reveals additional differences that probably have less to do with a cultural gap than with the gap between 2010 and the early 1990s, when the American episodes were made.


The British pilot, “Care,” was based on “Cradle to Grave” from the second American season.
Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show) Spoiler  
Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show) A 9-month-old boy is abandoned at a hospital, dead of carbon monoxide poisoning in the British version and hypothermia in the American; the investigation eventually leads to the owner of the apartment building where the child died.


In “Care” the roles of the boy’s mother and the apartment owner are both expanded, with the mother becoming more sympathetic and the landlord less so. The effect is to make the issues more black and white and the tone more moralistic, a shift captured in the closing arguments of the prosecutors. Michael Moriarty’s Ben Stone, in New York, shrugs and says, “Putting them in jail is the only remedy we have.” Ben Daniels’s James Steel, in London, squares his shoulders and declares, “We all have a duty of care to one another, and no breach shall go unpunished.”



A similar dramatic inflation takes place in “Buried,” based on the American second-season episode “... In Memory Of.”
Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show) Spoiler  
Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show) The same character is revealed as the killer in both versions, but the American case is resolved with a plea agreement, almost in passing, while the British case requires a dramatic courtroom confession. The British episode also ends with charged encounters outside the courthouse, a scene entirely absent from the original.



Normally a British adaptation of an American show could be expected to have an advantage in terms of acting, but again, the bar set by “Law & Order,” particularly in its first five seasons, was so high that the best the new series can do is a close second. Mr. Daniels, Jamie Bamber (“Battlestar Galactica”) and the much-honored stage actress Harriet Walter are fine but no match for their models, Mr. Moriarty, Chris Noth and Dann Florek. The fine Scottish actor Bill Paterson seems uncomfortable as the chief prosecutor, the role Steven Hill filled effortlessly for 10 seasons.


The standouts so far are Bradley Walsh (“Coronation Street”), who gets the right blend of humor and resignation in the Paul Sorvino-Jerry Orbach veteran detective slot, and Freema Agyeman (Martha Jones of “Dr. Who”), who covers several bases as the junior prosecutor. She’s both the minority idealist, played for three seasons by Richard Brooks, and the hot babe who often solves the case, played by a succession of actresses (none hotter than Ms. Agyeman).


The format adopted for “Law & Order: UK” makes these sorts of comparisons to “Law & Order” unavoidable, if not entirely fair. If you haven’t seen the originals, the new series will certainly stand on its own as a superior crime drama. If you have seen them, you’ll probably still enjoy their British adaptations, even if their primary effect is to remind you that “Law & Order,” in its heyday, was a superlative crime drama.

http://www.nytimes.com/2010/07/04/ar...ref=television
 
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