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Hi all.


I need some electric advice & guidance - I just bought my first house after being an apartment dweller for years. As a result I know next to nothing about electric, sorry in advance for many basic questions to come.


I think my CATV is grounded correctly, I just want to be sure. Here is the (all outside) connection path: from pole in street to my house, down side of house to a triple splitter. Attached to this splitter is a green wire.


This green wire goes to a copper-colored bolt/connector that connects a total of three green wires. The three wires are (1) from CATV coax splitter, (2) the phone box, and (3) the electric meter.


More info: The main electric box/circuit breaker is located inside the house directly behind/below the location of the outdoor meter. There is a copper-colored wire that goes from the main box inside to the outside and terminates in 2 ground rods (about 5 feet apart). My town has a code regarding the 2 ground rods.


Also, there does not appear to be a clamp or direct connection between the three outside green wires and a ground rod.



My questions:


* I assume the green wire from the meter is connected to my house's ground? If so, my CATV is grounded properly?


* Where is this "grounding block" that I keep reading about everywhere? Is it necessary for me to take the cover off of the circuit breaker box to see this "grounding block"?


* As far as the cable ground goes, I have read of a "CATV ground block". Where is it and how is it different than the regular "ground block"?


* If a satellite was to be installed it would need to be grounded. The ground connection would be to the same copper bolt that connects the other green wires?


Thanks.


Rich B.
 

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It would appear all is correctly grounded...ending up at the two rods in the ground. If you add Sat, your dish would have to be grounded to the same ground as the rest of the house (ie, likely at the point your cable is attached to the other 'green' wires.


A ground block is that connector your cable attaches to that has the green ground wire running out of it.


A "grounding block" for cable is a separate issue. That basically disrupts the cable from going to ground as a result of 'hum' bars in your TV. This will occur when your cable is grounded at two different locations (the distribution box and at your house, for example). It would appear you don't need a "grounding block" in your situation. The reason a grounding block is sometimes needed is that the two different grounds are at different "potentials" causing the hum bars.
 

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First off, I am not an electrican...


I was under the impression that more than 1 grounding rod is a 'bad thing'; if there was a lighting strike a potential could be built up between the grounding rods and could cause serious damage to the house.


any one have any comments on this?
 

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There is a difference between "two grounds" and "two grounding rods". Two grounds is where you have two entirely separate paths to ground; ie, from the electrical panel and say from the equipment in the theater. What was discribed above was one path to ground but two rods on that path.
 
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