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Hello all,


I am considering downloading and trying out a rental on the Playstation Store.

I have rented 2D on this in the past and thought it looked pretty good.


What is the output on the 3D files (1080P/720P) and is it frame packed or SBS?


Thanks in advance,
 

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I'm pretty sure it's half-res 1080p, set to auto-detect 3D. I believe Vudu is the same resolution.


But Vudu in my experience has been compression. The few 3D movies I've paid for on PSN have had double images due to a lousily configured 3D codec:
Quote:
Originally Posted by cakefoo  /t/1309724/psn-rentals-a-christmas-...ting-breaks-3d-psn-vs-vudu-pics#post_19884051


This is hard to explain without pictures, so here is one example from timestamp 31m 10s, where the ghost of Christmas Past floats near a chair.



2D screenshot:




Here is an A/B comparison of what the left and right images see:




And here is the same shot, but taken from the Vudu trailer!




Notice how in the PSN version, all the geometry is static, but the textures are shifting or doubling up. I can't really understand it. What this results in is a shimmering effect. And it can appear as if the textures are floating on a slightly different plane than the objects they're modeled on. It's difficult if not impossible to converge on things when they're covered in this mess, and it happens a large amount of the movie, mostly in backgrounds. It's hard to ignore.



This is my first 3D movie off PSN, so I don't know if the rest of the PSN encodes are botched like this. I was not impressed with the PSN encode, but I did like the 3D and the movie.
 

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I rented "The Mad Magician", a 1950's B&W 3D production. I thought it looked pretty solid on my 55" Samsung. Not blu-ray quality but not VHS either. The 3D was done well with more imaging staged ouside the screen plane, more like an IMAX 3D shooting style. I think it was SBS. It was enjoyable and I thought worth the small rental fee.

 

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The quality is less than a 3D Blu-ray!..Last week i rented MiB3 from the PS store,Picture was 720p so the image wasn't sharp and the picture didn't really look right,i'm guessing because of the data compression.
 

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Based on the pictures that Cakefoo posted, it looks like they're adding some ridiculous compression, which can absolutely ruin the 3D effect, because the two frames have to match exactly. When you add a lot of compression, you lose that, and it looks really really poor.


There really isn't a decent substitute for a straight up 3D Blu-ray. I just watched MiB3 on BD, and PQ was perfect.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jedi2016  /t/1417910/how-are-3d-rentals-on-the-playstation-store#post_22748104


Based on the pictures that Cakefoo posted, it looks like they're adding some ridiculous compression, which can absolutely ruin the 3D effect, because the two frames have to match exactly. When you add a lot of compression, you lose that, and it looks really really poor.

There really isn't a decent substitute for a straight up 3D Blu-ray. I just watched MiB3 on BD, and PQ was perfect.
I haven't rented a 3D movie from PSN for this reason. Well, also the selection reminds me of an abandoned Redbox.


edit: haven't rented one from PSN recently. I rented Monster house shortly after Christmas Carol and that was it.
 

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Current video compression schemes are based on what's acceptable in single frame 2D... it usually works by trying to carry as much data from one frame to the next as possible. So for instance in a panning shot the exact image data for a lamp may be used for the next frame just moved over slighlty despite the fact that the actual image data would be slightly different. Not until the change becomes significant does a the image data get updated. This effectilvely allows a lot of saved space.


Even on zooming this technique is used. If you watch carefully you can see that different objects sort of jump through sizes as the zoom occurs... so say you are zooming in on an airplane, if you watch you will see many compression schemes result in the plane remainig the same size through many frames despite the fact it should be getting a big bitter every frame.


This often manifests itself as a moving texture as the compression is able to identify the brigher and darker splotches of a texture as individual items and moves/shifts them independently of each other based on what it deems acceptable.


This is always at a scale that is generally hard to detect so doesn't detract from the experience in 2D...


Another thing that happens is macro blocking where sections of pixels are averaged and in low contrast areas can result in large visible squares. Because this process is based on averaging pixel data and each eyes pixel data will be different obviously the blocking doesn't match in both eyes... in fact even on zero parallax objects there is the high likelyhood that film grain or other image artifacts play a roll in creating two different sets of compression artifiacts... thus creating unresolvable different images for each eye, which is of course about the most distracting thing in 3D image viewing.


This is why bitrate and compression artifacts play such a huge roll in 3D video.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Devedander  /t/1417910/how-are-3d-rentals-on-the-playstation-store#post_22752319


Current video compression schemes are based on what's acceptable in single frame 2D... it usually works by trying to carry as much data from one frame to the next as possible. So for instance in a panning shot the exact image data for a lamp may be used for the next frame just moved over slighlty despite the fact that the actual image data would be slightly different. Not until the change becomes significant does a the image data get updated. This effectilvely allows a lot of saved space.

Even on zooming this technique is used. If you watch carefully you can see that different objects sort of jump through sizes as the zoom occurs... so say you are zooming in on an airplane, if you watch you will see many compression schemes result in the plane remainig the same size through many frames despite the fact it should be getting a big bitter every frame.

This often manifests itself as a moving texture as the compression is able to identify the brigher and darker splotches of a texture as individual items and moves/shifts them independently of each other based on what it deems acceptable.

This is always at a scale that is generally hard to detect so doesn't detract from the experience in 2D...

Another thing that happens is macro blocking where sections of pixels are averaged and in low contrast areas can result in large visible squares. Because this process is based on averaging pixel data and each eyes pixel data will be different obviously the blocking doesn't match in both eyes... in fact even on zero parallax objects there is the high likelyhood that film grain or other image artifacts play a roll in creating two different sets of compression artifiacts... thus creating unresolvable different images for each eye, which is of course about the most distracting thing in 3D image viewing.

This is why bitrate and compression artifacts play such a huge roll in 3D video.

Macro blocking is what i saw in MiB3..Very informative post,thank you!
 

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That's sad, because I thought the 3D in MiB3 was pretty good.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Devedander  /t/1417910/how-are-3d-rentals-on-the-playstation-store#post_22752319


Current video compression schemes are based on what's acceptable in single frame 2D... it usually works by trying to carry as much data from one frame to the next as possible. So for instance in a panning shot the exact image data for a lamp may be used for the next frame just moved over slighlty despite the fact that the actual image data would be slightly different. Not until the change becomes significant does a the image data get updated. This effectilvely allows a lot of saved space.

Even on zooming this technique is used. If you watch carefully you can see that different objects sort of jump through sizes as the zoom occurs... so say you are zooming in on an airplane, if you watch you will see many compression schemes result in the plane remainig the same size through many frames despite the fact it should be getting a big bitter every frame.

This often manifests itself as a moving texture as the compression is able to identify the brigher and darker splotches of a texture as individual items and moves/shifts them independently of each other based on what it deems acceptable.

This is always at a scale that is generally hard to detect so doesn't detract from the experience in 2D...

Another thing that happens is macro blocking where sections of pixels are averaged and in low contrast areas can result in large visible squares. Because this process is based on averaging pixel data and each eyes pixel data will be different obviously the blocking doesn't match in both eyes... in fact even on zero parallax objects there is the high likelyhood that film grain or other image artifacts play a roll in creating two different sets of compression artifiacts... thus creating unresolvable different images for each eye, which is of course about the most distracting thing in 3D image viewing.

This is why bitrate and compression artifacts play such a huge roll in 3D video.


Great post. Sensio is (finally) announcing that their 3DGO video-on-demand store is going live at CES next week. 3DGO uses a proprietary compression format that was developed specifically for 3D, so hopefully it will solve some of the issues being discussed in this thread. Unfortunately, for now, only Vizio and Hisense 3DTVs support the Sensio format.
 

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Vudu's fine, it's just PSN that's noticeably crap. But I haven't rented a movie on PSN in a long-ass time, so maybe they've improved since then.
 

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Video quality definitely below bluray quality.

I have only been able to get 2 channel audio from the 3 rentals of 3d movies I have had over the PSN. Doubt I will rent any more from them.


Have you guys that have rented 3D movies from the PSN gotten 5.1 audio?
 
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