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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have the Mits 46807 and have the Hughes E86 Titan HDTV receiver on the way (hopefully on Tuesday). How can I calibrate the HD input on the Mits with AVIA? Do I just hook my interlaced DVD player up to the HD input and calibrate it that way, before my receiver even gets here? Will that HD input on the Mits accept my dvd player?

Any explanation would be appreciated.

Thanks,

Neal
 

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You can't really use Avia for the HD input. You can use it for 480p coming into the HD input, and you could even use an HTPC to scale it to 720p or 1080i, but that wouldn't be the same. You will need a high def pattern generator, something like this:

www.accupel.com


which is kind of an Avia in a box, and puts out patterns at native HD formats. You could also have such patterns recorded onto a hard disk with something like the Teleman HD card, and play it back at the correct resolution, though it might be a lot less convenient because they would be linearly recorded, and calibration is definitely a non-linear adventure.


So your best bet is to find a calibrator who has a pattern generator.



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Dean Roddey

The CIDLib C++ Frameworks

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I just took a look at my manual and on the back panel it shows the dedicated DTV input. Written above the inputs it says 480i/480p/1080i does this mean calibrating it with AVIA (atleast to some level without high priced equipment) could be as easy as hooking the dvd player straight into the input? I know this input is for 1080i use, but couldn't it also be used as a third 480i or 480p input?

Thanks for your time,

Neal
 

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Perhaps that series of inputs is related to what the Misubishi site calls the DPM3 third-generation pixel multiplier for converting 480i sources to either 480p or 960i. No doubt an input circuit could handle more than just 480i. The DPM3 is for displaying "standard TV programming with dramatically improved apparent resolution." according to Mitsubishi. I assume the output of your Hughes will go into either RGB or component inputs, and these sections, as indicated, require an HDTV-type test signal or a computer simulation. -- John


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I have managed to get the avia output onto the HD input via my VCR. Take the DVD output and run it into the VCR input. Take the RF output of the VCR and input that into the STB. Tune the STB to channel 3. You can also buy a standalone RF modulator if you don't have a VCR handy.


--Rick
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Rick,

I think I saw this process on another forum..just seemed like alot of resolution might be taken this way..but if more and more people are using it, I will give that a try when my box comes in.

Thanks for the post,

Neal
 

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It's not HD, but It works fine for setting up Overscan and Geometry.


The DTV input will accept anything(480i/480p/1080i), however If you input 480i you can only tweek the NTSC grid. In order to tweek the HDTV grid, you must input a 1080i signal, hence the need to use the STB.


--Rick
 

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I should have been more specific. Avia cannot be used to set up the "HD modes", no matter what input is used for that. Many inputs can accept multiple formats, but each signal type generally has its own configuration settings. If you feed a DVD signal in, you will only be calibrating the 480i or 480p settings, not the 720p or 1080i settings.


And even if you use an HTPC to upconvert Avia to 720p or 1080i, its not the same since it does not have orignal HD resolution, so some of the patterns won't really be very useful. As mentioned, you can do centering and geometry, since at least you are feeding it the correct type of signal, so it will have switched to the correct set of configuration settings. But in many cases thing won't necessarily be correct unless the signal put out by the HTPC exactly matches the charateristics of a HD signal, which the HTPC might not.


Its always best to use real HD signals to do the calibration. If you've spent enough bucks to get a HD system, it makes sense to spend a few more and get it correctly calibrated, I think.



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Dean Roddey

The CIDLib C++ Frameworks

[email protected]
www.charmedquark.com
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
You are probably right about spending a few more bucks. But the fact is, I'm still trying to finish college while building my HT system. So, I really can't afford what I have so far..lol. So in this instace, a little more turns into a lot more, which I just can't do right now.

Thanks again,

Neal
 

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Dean is right, if you really want to calibrate your set, you need the right gear. I found my method is ok to what I use it for. If you really want it done right, go for an ISF calibration. the $300 is probably a lot less than the equipment needed to properly calibrate HDTV.


--Rick
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Where have you found an calibration for 300 bucks...seems like around 500 is more the trend.

Neal
 

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I've seen them done for as low as $300 when a group deal is done. Most of the time 4 to 5 hundred is normal.


--Rick
 

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"the $300 is probably a lot less than the equipment needed to properly calibrate HDTV."


Most definitely it would be! Actually a good calibration, as mentioned, might be more than that, it would still be true. My Accupel HDG-2000 was $1000, and it was a breakthrough in price for such things (competitive units cost twice that.) My CA-1 colorimeter, also a price breakthrough since its software based, was $1300 (again, competitive hardware based ones can be twice that.) And of couse you need a laptop computer, or at least a desktop close to the set to be calibrated.


I would though, for those who are really serious about this thing of ours, suggest that people get these types of tools. I'm on my third display device over the 3 years or so since I got into this hobby. If I'd paid $500 to have each one calibrated, I would have been halfway towards paying for my calibration toys anyway. Another couple and they'll have paid for themselves, not to mention that I get to help out friends and do periodic maintenance on my own projector.


So it can be a better deal than it looks. I also bought the base package of SpectraPLUS, a real time audio spectrum analyzer software package. It was only $220, and another $150 for a high quality condensor mic (which you could get a lot cheaper than that without significant concerns).


Those three things, plus the Avia DVD, are a quite complete home theater calibration tool suite, as good as any of the pros you are likely to pay to come over. Of course a pro can also bring a lot of non-tangible benefits, such as vast experience. But once you've seen someone do a particular projector, its pretty easy if you have a little experience to pick it up from there and get the required expertise. And of course you can practice on friend's sets, kind of like going to the hair cutting school for free hair cuts, in exchange for the possibility that they might not do it very well :)


But once you've learned one type of set from a manufacturer, its relatively straightforward to get a tech manual for the newer models and do a good job. Its only on the higher end FP systems that you have to put in some serious study time, becuase they can be very complex and flexible and non-intuitive. And of course you won't have many friends with a Vision One who are going to let you come over and have a go at it :cool:



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Dean Roddey

The CIDLib C++ Frameworks

[email protected]
www.charmedquark.com
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Rick,

Thanks for clarifying that..guess I will just have to wait a few days til my HD receiver hopefully gets shipped..hoping for these things to get shipped is worst, since so many delivery dates are constantly pushed back. I have been given a specific date, which usually means the reseller has a specific date from the manufacturer. Because if it doesn't ship that day, that could easily be construed as false advertising.

Just have to see what happens,

Neal
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
That seems like a great idea Dave. I don't really know how to go about proposing that. Anyone got any suggestions?
 

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I would love to see Dish send this type of signal.


Gary




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STOP DVI/HDCP!

DVI/HDCP! ~= HD-DIVX!!!

DO NOT SUPPORT JVC or anyone else who supports this!
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
I haven't seen HD on my set yet..but I know its gonna need some AVIA tweaking, its not gonna be perfect..I would pay 20 bucks in a heartbeat to have a full 1080i signal so I could tweak it..that would be unbelievably cheap.

Neal
 
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