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Quote:
Originally Posted by Raymond Leggs /forum/post/17010486


How close togeather should the 2 fronts be?

I want them just to the sides of the monitor. Movie soundtracks are mixed with the intention that the sound from the three front speakers comes from the screen. In a theater, the front speakers are typically behind the screen, which is acoustically transparent.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Raymond Leggs /forum/post/17010486


How close togeather should the 2 fronts be?
Quote:
Originally Posted by Peter White /forum/post/17010556


I want them just to the sides of the monitor. Movie soundtracks are mixed with the intention that the sound from the three front speakers comes from the screen. In a theater, the front speakers are typically behind the screen, which is acoustically transparent.

I don't see anything in the OP's question about a tv being in between the two front speakers. In any case, you can find the best answer here:

http://www.dolby.com/consumer/home_e...ide/index.html
 

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Raymond, just position them so it sounds good to you. There really is no right or wrong, only guidelines and starting points. All sorts of things come into play. Such as room dimensions, how close are the side walls, what is the shape of the room?
 

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Well, there is a correct recommendation, and you can definitely go wrong...


Your preferred listening position, the left speaker, and the right speaker should form a triangle with equal sides. That means that the distance between the speakers should be equal to the distance from your listening position to either speaker. Ideally, this should also end up with the left and right speakers close to the edges of the TV screen.


Funny things happen when the speakers are too far apart, and putting the speakers too close together reduces the stereo effect.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Easyaspie /forum/post/17014149


Raymond, just position them so it sounds good to you. There really is no right or wrong, only guidelines and starting points. All sorts of things come into play. Such as room dimensions, how close are the side walls, what is the shape of the room?

The only thing I agree with is positioning until they sound good to you. And then change it!


I've heard countless systems (including my own) that sound good. And I've heard a few (mine currently) that sound fantastic. It can be involved, but here are some basics that I've learned:


1) measure the distance from the speakers to where you sit.


2) Place a piece of tape on the floor directly in front of you, and between the speakers.


3)Place speakers the exact space apart from eachother that equals how far away they are (equilateral triangle), with the piece of tape directly in the middle.


4) listen to a MONO recording of a female voice (no subwoofer, as little accompanying music as possible)


5) slightly adjust toe-in/tow out until you get a solid 'image' of the voice right in the middle.


There are a lot of other things involved, including space from the rear wall, side wall, floor covering or the lack thereof. But these 5 steps should get you on the right path.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by swspiers /forum/post/17027247


The only thing I agree with is positioning until they sound good to you. And then change it!


I've heard countless systems (including my own) that sound good. And I've heard a few (mine currently) that sound fantastic. It can be involved, but here are some basics that I've learned:


1) measure the distance from the speakers to where you sit.


2) Place a piece of tape on the floor directly in front of you, and between the speakers.


3)Place speakers the exact space apart from eachother that equals how far away they are (equilateral triangle), with the piece of tape directly in the middle.


4) listen to a MONO recording of a female voice (no subwoofer, as little accompanying music as possible)


5) slightly adjust toe-in/tow out until you get a solid 'image' of the voice right in the middle.


There are a lot of other things involved, including space from the rear wall, side wall, floor covering or the lack thereof. But these 5 steps should get you on the right path.

Or if you have a modern AVR or pre/pro.......use your auto set-up/room correction.



Sorry to simplfiy, but I think most people will get the idea of this stuff. however there is one guy who posts in the Paradigm owners thread who has his floor standing speakers only 4' apart!
 

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Good point, Easy!


My Ohm's are about 5' apart, which just seems wrong visually, but I can't argue with the imaging.


Call me old fashioned, but I'm more into setting up the stuff correctly than using processing to compensate for the room/set-up. And please, don't interpret me as being snobby. I'v learned more in the past 3 months than I have the last 20 years. But there really is something magical about having things set-up for best imaging and soundstage.


-S
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by hphase /forum/post/17020542


Well, there is a correct recommendation, and you can definitely go wrong...


Your preferred listening position, the left speaker, and the right speaker should form a triangle with equal sides. That means that the distance between the speakers should be equal to the distance from your listening position to either speaker.

That's one philosophy. There ARE others.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by sivadselim /forum/post/17027669


That's one philosophy. There ARE others.

Those other 'philosophies' are wrong.


It's best to stick with the ITU recommendations. If possible.

Studio where the soundtracks are mixed and mastered use this setup.


Difficult room sizes and shapes might require a compromise to get the best possible setup considering the circumstances. But such a setup will always be less optimal.
 

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To be honest, i also find that there is a difference depending if you watch movies vs listening to music. The sweetspot for enveloping music for me, is abit in front of the sweet spot that i have for movies. But then, i much more often watch movies, and the current setup is just perfect. For music, they should be just a tiny bit more separated to get the imaging to be abit more enveloping. It still sounds fantastic, so its just nitpick. That said, getting them abit more far apart also gives more problems with the sidewalls, which are really already too close to the speakers.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Frank Derks /forum/post/17027983


Those other 'philosophies' are wrong.


It's best to stick with the ITU recommendations. If possible.

Studio where the soundtracks are mixed and mastered use this setup.


Difficult room sizes and shapes might require a compromise to get the best possible setup considering the circumstances. But such a setup will always be less optimal.

Yeah, and if we had a room the exact same size as the studio and the exact same speakers each studio used for each movie...............


Raymond, just set them up so it sounds good to you. Like I said before.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Frank Derks /forum/post/17027983


Those other 'philosophies' are wrong.

Frank, the biggest problem I see with the advice you gave is it says nothing of the length of the triangle sides. These are critical to obtaining maximum performance.


Since some speakers are designed to be listened to near field and some are long throw speakers, and there is everything in between this length is extremely important and different among different speaker designs.


While this equilateral triangle or whatever may be best for adhering to a given set of reproduction standards it isn't the end of the story.
 
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